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  • keithmroberts

    How NOT to use blogs

    By keithmroberts

    This area is not for queries but for ongoing blogs. if you want to ask for help, please go to the appropriate sub-forum in the main part of the GWF. You have been asked to make your first post in a specified location. Once you have done that, your query can be raised in the various sections of the forum. If you previously posted a request for help or information in this area, it is likely to be deleted at some point in the next few weeks or months. So if you have a reply, please make a note o
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St. Pierre Cemetery, Amiens

During part of August 1914, Amiens was the British Advanced Base. It was captured by the Germans on 31 August, and retaken by the French on the following 13 September. The German offensive which began in March 1918 had Amiens for at least one of its objectives but the Battle of Amiens (8 - 11 August 1918) is the Allied name for the action by which the counter offensive, the Advance to Victory, was begun. The 7th General Hospital was at Amiens in August 1914; the 56th (South Midland) Casualty Cle

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L'Homme Mort British Cemetery

The hamlet of L'Homme Mort saw fighting in March and August 1918. Plot I, Row A, of the cemetery was made in August 1918; the rest of this Plot and the whole of Plot II were formed after the Armistice when 152 graves were brought in from the neighbouring battlefields. The cemetery now contains 166 burials of the Great War, 104 of them unidentified.

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RA Memorial Hyde Park

RA Memorial Hyde Park

Finally this year, 39 years a Gunner, I visited the Royal Artillery Memorial on Hyde Park Corner.   Commemorating those who lost their lives in the First and Second World Wars, the memorial was unveiled in October 1925 by H. R. H the Duke of Connaught. It was dedicated to the 49,076  Gunners who lost their lives during the First World War.   The memorial was designed by  Charles Sargeant Jagger MC. It features bronze figures and sculptured reliefs depicting the Gunners activ

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Categories of the UNKNOWN Cases

These are the categories that I have on my computer in bookmarks. I will update this page on a regular basis, particularly during the early phase of the "sorting into categories".   These are ONLY for the British cases here on the GWF. They do not include any of the cases on the CEFSG (here).   I was initially posting this information for the benefit of GWF PALS that wanted to investigate the case further and possibly take it to the reporting stage. I was not familiar enough

laughton

laughton

Richards Battery RGA

Richards Battery RGA

Among the Heavy Batteries of the Royal Garrison Artillery listed on the Long Long Trail is Richards Battery. An unusual designation outside the normal numbering system. Once again GWF Pals had the  the answer; Richards Battery, RGA, XVII Corps June/July 1916.   The Richards Battery was formed on 16th June 1916 with details from 105 Siege Battery and the 51st (Highland) Division Heavy Trench Mortars. On the 21st June Captain Richards and three subalterns took over 3 x 220mm French Guns.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Queant Road Cemetery, Buissy

Buissy was reached by the Third Army on 2 September 1918, after the storming of the Drocourt-Queant line, and it was evacuated by the Germans on the following day. Queant Cemetery was made by the 2nd and 57th Casualty Clearing Stations in October and November 1918. It then consisted of 71 graves (now Plot I, Rows A and B), but was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when 2200 graves were brought in from the battlefields of 1917-1918 between Arras and Bapaume, and from smaller burial grounds in

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Battery L

Battery L

The Royal Artillery Association published a poem recording the action of L Battery Royal Artillery at Nery on September 1st 1914 when 3 Victoria Crosses were won.   NERY GUN     It was written in 1915 by Gunner BS Chandler whilst recovering in an Army Hospital in Cheltenham. It was written in a scrap book collated by recovering soldiers.     The 3 Victoria Crosses were won by Captain Edward Bradbury, Battery Sergeant-Major George Dorrell and Serg

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

First Consol - Captured 12in Rail Howitzer

First Consol - Captured 12in Rail Howitzer

I was asked about some information about a Rail Howitzer captured during the German Spring Offensive in April 1918.   Source: Deutsches Hisorisches Museum   The gun was captured near Erquingehm-Lys where the British had built a rail spur to fire railway artillery.      In April 1918, the Germans launched Operation Georgette quickly pushing the British back, capturing the 12 inch Railway Howitzer, named the First Consol at Erquninhem-Lys near Arment

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Chauny Communal Cemetery British Extension

The Extension was made after the Armistice for the burial of remains brought in from the battlefields of the Aisne and from the following smaller cemeteries in the surrounding countryside. There are just over 1,000 Great War casualties commemorated in this site. The majority of them died in 1918; most of the rest died in September, 1914. Included the total figure are 6 soldiers of the United Kingdom whose identity had been established with reasonable, but not absolute certainty and who are comme

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Artillery Observation Limber Pole Ladder

Artillery Observation Limber Pole Ladder

I have spent many an hour observing artillery fire - on foot, lying in the open, in a concrete bunker, in a trench and in the air. I have never had to experience a precarious OP position such as the Artillery Observation Limber Pole Ladder. I suppose in the flat dessert of Mesopotamia with the absence of a good OP bring your own..... though being a sitting duck does have it's disadvantages. And how does one get a cup of tea sitting at the top of the pole ! The Imperial war Museum records " These

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Ancre British Cemetery

The village of Beaumont-Hamel was attacked on 1 July 1916 by the 29th Division, with the 4th on its left and the 36th (Ulster) on its right, but without success. On 3 September a further attack was delivered between Hamel and Beaumont-Hamel and on 13 and 14 November, the 51st (Highland), 63rd (Royal Naval), 39th and 19th (Western) Divisions finally succeeded in capturing Beaumont-Hamel, Beaucourt-sur-Ancre and St. Pierre-Divion. Following the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line in the sprin

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Lebucquiere Communal Cemetery Extension

Lebucquiere village was occupied by Commonwealth forces on 19 March 1917, following the German withdrawal to the Hindenburg Line. It was recaptured by the Germans on 23 March 1918, after fierce resistance by the 19th (Western) Division, and was finally reoccupied by the 5th Division on 3 September 1918. The communal cemetery extension was begun on 24 March 1917 and was used by the 1st Australian Division and other units for almost a year. After the reoccupation of the village in September 1918,

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Hangard Communal Cemetery Extension Revisited

At the end of March 1918, Hangard was at the junction of the French and Commonwealth forces defending Amiens. From 4 to 25 April, the village and Hangard Wood were the scene of incessant fighting, in which the line was held and the 18th Division were particularly heavily engaged. On 8 August, the village was cleared by the 1st and 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles. The original extension to the communal cemetery was made by the Canadian Corps in August 1918. It consisted of 51 graves in the present Pl

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Hedge Row Trench Cemetery

The commune of Zillebeke contains many Commonwealth cemeteries as the front line trenches ran through it during the greater part of the Great War. Hedge Row Trench Cemetery was begun in March 1915 and used until August 1917, sometimes under the name of Ravine Wood Cemetery. The cemetery suffered very severely from shell fire, and after the Armistice the positions of the individual graves could not be found or reconstructed. The headstones are therefore arranged symmetrically round the Cross of S

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Ramillies British Cemetery

The village of Ramillies was captured by the Canadian Corps on the night of 8-9 October 1918. The original cemetery contained 93 graves dating from 30 September to 17 October but after the Armistice, further graves were brought into the cemetery. Ramillies British Cemetery now contains 180 Great War burials. The cemetery was designed by W C Von Berg.

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Chester Farm Cemetery

Chester Farm was the name given to a farm about 1 Km South of Blauwepoort Farm, on the road from Zillebeke to Voormezeele. The cemetery was begun in March 1915 and was used by front line troops until November 1917. Plot I contains the graves of 92 officers and men of the 2nd Manchesters, who died in April-July 1915 and there are 72 London Regiment burials elsewhere in the Cemetery. There are 420 Commonwealth servicemen buried or commemorated in this cemetery. Seven of the burials are unidentifie

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Sanctuary Wood Cemetery Revisited

Sanctuary Wood is one of the larger woods in the commune of Zillebeke. It was named in November 1914, when it was used to screen troops behind the front line. It was the scene of fighting in September 1915 and was the centre of the Battle of Mount Sorrel (2-13 June 1916) involving the 1st and 3rd Canadian Divisions. There were three Commonwealth cemeteries at Sanctuary Wood before June 1916, all made in May-August 1915. The first two were on the western end of the wood, the third in a clearing f

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Ottawa (Beechwood) Cemetery, Great War Burials & Memorials

Ottawa (Beechwood) Cemetery contains 99 Commonwealth burials of the Great War and 113 from the Second World War. Many of the graves are in two veterans plots, with the Cross of Sacrifice dedicated to all service casualties buried in the cemetery, located in the newer plot. The Ottawa Cremation Memorial is in a shelter adjoining the newer of the veterans plots in the cemetery and commemorates 26 Second World War servicmen whose remains were cremated elsewhere in Canada and the U.S.A. Many Great W

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Mazingarbe Communal Cemetery Extension

Mazingarbe Communal Cemetery was used by units and field ambulances from June 1915 to February 1916. It contains 108 Commonwealth burials of the First World War and 24 French war graves. The adjoining Communal Cemetery Extension was begun by the 16th (Irish) Division in April 1916 and was used until October 1918. It contains 248 Commonwealth burials of the Great War and two German graves. The extension was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

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Knightsbridge Cemetery

The cemetery, which is named from a communication trench, was begun at the outset of the Battle of the Somme in 1916. It was used by units fighting on that front until the German withdrawal in February 1917 and was used again by fighting units from the end of March to July 1918, when the German advance brought the front line back to the Ancre. After the Armistice, some burials in Rows G, H and J were added when graves were brought in from isolated positions on the battlefields of 1916 and 1918 r

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Mesnil Ridge Cemetery, Mesnil-Martinsart

Mesnil Ridge Cemetery, Mesnil-Martinsart.  The cemetery was made by Field Ambulances and fighting units (mainly of the 29th and 36th (Ulster) Divisions) between August 1915 and August, 1916. There are now nearly 100 casualties of the Great War commemorated in this site. The cemetery covers an area of 747 square metres and is enclosed by a stone rubble wall.  Mesnil-Martinsart is a commune in the Department of the Somme, on the right bank of the Ancre, between Albert and Beaumont-Hamel. Using the

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The King's Pilgrimage, 11 - 13 May 1922

The King's Pilgrimage, 11-13 May 1922   Buckingham Palace, May 17, 1922.   Dear Sir Fabian Ware,   The King desires me to thank you again for all the admirable arrangements made by you in connection with the visit to the cemeteries in Belgium and France, and to congratulate your staff on their excellent work. His Majesty was interested to learn the details of the organization of the Commission, and is satisfied that, so long as it is superintended by you and those

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Albert Communal Cemetery Extension

Albert was held by French forces against the German advance on the Somme in September 1914. It passed into British hands in the summer of 1915; and the first fighting in July 1916, is known as the Battle of Albert, 1916. It was captured by the Germans on the 26th April 1918, and before its recapture by the 8th East Surreys on the following 22nd August (in the Battle of Albert, 1918,) it had been completely destroyed by artillery fire. The Extension was used by fighting units and Field Ambulances

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