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  • keithmroberts

    How NOT to use blogs

    By keithmroberts

    This area is not for queries but for ongoing blogs. if you want to ask for help, please go to the appropriate sub-forum in the main part of the GWF. You have been asked to make your first post in a specified location. Once you have done that, your query can be raised in the various sections of the forum. If you previously posted a request for help or information in this area, it is likely to be deleted at some point in the next few weeks or months. So if you have a reply, please make a note o
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"Only With Honour"

Sunday 22nd August. Went to bed  in afternoon but received message to go to Lys Farm at the extreme right of our trenches, so got up feeling rotten. Found man doubled with colic, had to stretcher him back along trenches full of traverses. It necessitated lifting stretcher and I carried stretcher for a time. Retired early to bed with aspirin and high temperature and good sweat, woke at 1:00am  feeling quite well. Wonderful thing aspirin! Slept well and no casualties.   Monday 23rd

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

"Only With Honour"

Saturday 7th August. The prospects of continuing to live amicably with Jack are not very bright. The novelty of renewing our acquaintance after a break of eight years has gradually worn off and we must rely on intellect and an interchange of sympathies to keep us together. I fear we have very little in common now. I have never touched on topics of religion with him, nor have I opened up theosophical subjects. Yesterday however, some question of the deeper truth was allowed to and he sh

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

"Only With Honour"

Monday 26th July. Logan turned up from St Omer. They seemed anxious for him to join a committee or board which is going into the question of "gas"In the event of him leaving I hope to be able to take his place as MO to the 6th Royal West Kent Regiment. So I returned home about lunch time to find our CO Colonel Dunn was gone!! Great consternation! I think everyone is considerably relieved to be rid of this dear old hen, always fussing and never satisfied with anyone. Major Turner has taken h

RegHannay

RegHannay

Hartley Railway Gun

Hartley Railway Gun

An account from The North Eastern Railway In the First World War (Rob Langham / ISBN-978-1-78155-081-6)  outlines the presence of a rail gun at Hartley on the Northumberland Coast , 10 km (8 miles) north of Tynemouth.     The gun was deployed on the Collywell Bay Branch line which was in the process of completion as war broke out in August 1914, and the project was halted.       Source: http://www.disused-stations.org.uk/b

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

"Only With Honour"

Thursday 15th July. The officer died at 9:45am, some of his brother officers were just in time to see him before he lost consciousness. Today is the French presidents birthday and the people celebrated by having a holiday, the Huns by throwing nearly 200 shells into town. Comparatively little damage was done but people are very scared and moving out in great numbers.   Saturday 17th July. The Germans successfully shelled the church a Neuve Eglise until it took fire and burnt

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

"Only With Honour"

Saturday 3rd July. Made a journey in car to Gunners Farm for wounded, shell burst on our right otherwise things are quiet. Had some games of tennis in afternoon with jack. Still very out of practice especially on forehand strokes, serve not so bad considering. Chaps look amusing playing in khaki and funnier still playing in kilts!   Tues 6th July. All officers including Colonel Dunn turned out for riding lesson. I had Sergeant Major Down. We all careered around the field. The

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

"Only With Honour"

Tuesday 15th June. We brought back some bread rolls to our rooms on Monday. Reveille at 5:00 am today.  I made tea and with rolls we had breakfast in  bed instead of at the mess. I am billeting officer, started away in front of the field ambulance in a motor ambulance with my billeting party consisting of interpreter, Sergeant Butcher and six men. I had no name of a place as to help me for a destination, I simply had a point given me on a map being about eight miles away. How

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

"Only With Honour"

Monday 7th June. *Ralph Montgomery Vaughan. M.C. 1890-1976. Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers.  In 1912 he began his flight training at the Bristol school, Salisbury Plain. He subsequently joined No3 squadron Netheravon, from there to No5 squadron on its formation. Appointed to R.F.C reserve and in December seconded to the R.F.C as flying officer.  On the 15th August 1914 on flight to France Vaughan made a forced landing near Boulogne and was arrested by the French and kept for almost

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

"Only With Honour"

Tuesday 1st June. Perfect weather and cloudless sky, the brilliant green of the fields and hedges is almost bewildering in the sunshine. We had a free day and the men are well occupied with washing their clothes and bodies after the long journey from England. Jack is mess president and so far he has managed to spread excellent meals on the table in the old chateau. They have also very fine wine in the chateau 1.25 franc blanc and 1.50 franc for rouge per bottle. In the afternoon Jack B

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

only with honour

Monday 31st May. De-trained St Omer at 4:00 pm, marched field ambulance for five miles to Cormette through beautiful cultivated fields. Cormette, a little hamlet nestling among trees with one large farmhouse, the chateau which was occupied by the C.O. Large rooms riddled in rat holes and nearly all the furniture removed in case of Germans. Lovely garden. roses, vines and lilac. We are now in sound of the guns, which are continually rumbling in the distance perhaps 15 - 20 miles away. I

RegHannay

RegHannay

 

"Only with Honour"

"Only with honour"...The W.W.1 diaries of Reginald Hannay Fothergill Medical officer R.A.M.C (mentioned in despatches) May 1915 - August 1916. Being the receiver of a white feather Reggie felt obliged to do his duty and volunteer to serve his country entering the war in late May 1915.   At the beginning of his journey you feel his excitement of adventure even at 35 years of age. then the disillusionment with the leadership and the futility of it all becomes clear. He writes w

RegHannay

RegHannay

Gunners shoot down Zeppelin L15 - Well Hit

Gunners shoot down Zeppelin L15 - Well Hit

A query from a friend about anti-aircraft artillery in WW1 lead to a realisation that the first Zeppelin successfully shot down was actually the result of anti-aircraft fire from the Gunners. Zeppelin L15 was brought down on the night of 31st March / 1st April 1916, ahead of the action of William Leefe Robinson on the 2nd September 1916, for which he was awarded the Victoria Cross.   At the start of the First World War there was no Anti-Aircraft organisation beyond a few guns and an a

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

No 1 Camel Battery RGA

No 1 Camel Battery RGA

More camel artillery - this time in Aden. No 1 Camel Battery Royal Garrison Artillery     Aden, located near the entrance to the Red Sea, was vital for the security of the route through the Suez Canal. The port came under British control in 1838 as a base on the route to India. In gained increased prominence with the opening of the  Suez Canal in 1869. The Ottoman Empire seized control of Yemen to the north, whilst Britain established protectorates with local rulers in the Ad

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Chapel Corner Cemetery, Sauchy-Lestrée

Sauchy-Lestrée was captured by the 56th (London) Division on 27 September 1918, and the cemetery was made and used by fighting units during the following five weeks. It contained 50 burials at the Armistice, and others were then added from the surrounding battlefields and from the following cemeteries:- EPINOY ROAD CEMETERY, EPINOY, was on the road from Sauchy-Lestrée to Epinoy, just West of the point where it crosses the road from Sauchy-Cauchy to Haynecourt. It was made by fighting units, and

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Foncquevillers Military Cemetery

In 1915 and 1916 the Allied front line ran between Foncquevillers and Gommecourt. The cemetery was begun by French troops, and taken over by Commonweatlh forces. It remained in use by units and field ambulances until March 1917, the burials in July 1916 (particularly in Plot I, Row L) being especially numerous. The cemetery was used again from March to August 1918, when the German offensive brought the front line back to nearly the old position. Seventy-four graves were brought in after the Armi

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Schaffen Communal Cemetery

The British Expeditionary Force was involved in the later stages of the defence of Belgium following the German invasion in May 1940, and suffered many casualties in covering the withdrawal to Dunkirk. Commonwealth forces did not return until September 1944, but in the intervening years, many airmen were shot down or crashed in raids on strategic objectives in Belgium, or while returning from missions over Germany. Schaffen Communal Cemetery contains the graves of 20 Commonwealth airmen of the S

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

A. I. F. Burial Ground, Flers

Flers was captured on 15 September 1916, in the Battle of Flers-Courcelette, when it was entered by the New Zealand and 41st Divisions behind tanks, the innovative new weapons that were used here for the first time. The village was lost during the German advance of March 1918 and retaken at the end of the following August by the 10th West Yorks and the 6th Dorsets of the 17th Division. The cemetery was begun by Australian medical units, posted in the neighbouring caves, in November 1916-February

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

New Irish Farm Cemetery

New Irish Farm Cemetery was first used from August to November 1917 and was named after a nearby farm, known to the troops as 'Irish Farm' (originally there was an Irish Farm Cemetery immediately South of the Farm. New Irish Farm Cemetery is about 300 metres North of the Farm at a crossing once known as Hammond's Corner). It was used again in April and May 1918 and at the Armistice it contained just 73 burials - the three irregular rows of Plot I - but was then greatly enlarged when more than 4,

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

Ubique - Our Gunners in the Great War

Ubique - Our Gunners in the Great War

Many thanks to fellow GWF Blogger Edward Walshe for a film on his YouTube Channel - Ubique 1916 1917.   © IWM (IWM 430) UBIQUE - OUR GUNNERS IN THE GREAT WAR [MAIN TITLE] The work of the Royal Field Artillery and Royal Garrison Artillery, mainly on the Western Front, 1916-1917. Drivers water their horses at a trough. A brigade of RFA 18-pounders moves off from their camp ground. Other 18-pounders move past dead Highlanders (from IWM 191 BATTLE OF THE SOMME). A battery of 18-pound

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Albert Communal Cemetery - 41st (Durham) Siege Battery RGA

Albert Communal Cemetery - 41st (Durham) Siege Battery RGA

Recent research into camel artillery and the mountain battery of the Hong Kong and Singapore Royal Garrison Artillery recalled a connection to Northumbrian Gunners.   In the Albert Communal Cemetery extension there is a communal grave of 12 soldiers, 11 Gunners from the 41st Siege Battery RGA, and 1 attached from the Army Service Corps.     The 41st Siege Battery was formed under Major H.C. Hall at Lydd 6th July 1915. It was composed of regular gunners from the Hong Kong

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

RGA - Singapore Mutiny 1915

RGA - Singapore Mutiny 1915

Whilst researching Royal Garrison Artillery units I came across a commemoration to Gunners who had been killed during a Mutiny in Singapore in February 1915.    The Royal Garrison Artillery (RGA) operated the coastal guns that protected Singapore. They were manned by the 78th and 80th Companies RGA and Indian Army Gunners from the Hong Kong and Singapore Royal Garrison Artillery (HKS-RGA).  A British  infantry battalion, and the Singapore  Volunteers Batt

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

La Laiterie Military Cemetery

The cemetery, named from a dairy farm, was begun in November 1914 and used until October 1918 by units holding this sector of the front. The different plots were, to a great extent, treated as regimental burial grounds; the majority of the graves in Plots II, III and X, for instance, were those of the 26th, 25th and 24th Canadian Infantry Battalions, respectively, and all but one of the graves in Plot VIII are those of the 5th Northumberland Fusiliers. On 25 April 1918, the cemetery fell into Ge

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

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