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  • keithmroberts

    How NOT to use blogs

    By keithmroberts

    This area is not for queries but for ongoing blogs. if you want to ask for help, please go to the appropriate sub-forum in the main part of the GWF. You have been asked to make your first post in a specified location. Once you have done that, your query can be raised in the various sections of the forum. If you previously posted a request for help or information in this area, it is likely to be deleted at some point in the next few weeks or months. So if you have a reply, please make a note o
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In action in the Upper Kurram

On 26th May 1919 the Afghans attacked the Kurram Militia outposts protecting the Peiwar Villages in the Upper Kurram Valley. Afghan regulars and tribesmen,  supported by artillery fire, advanced across the border near Peiwar Kotal. Captain R W Wilson of the Kurram Militia  counterattacked with 200 men. The Afghans were driven back with considerable loss. The militia were reinforced by number 2 section of 22 MMG, who were relieved on 27 May by number 3 section, commanded by A/Sjt Bill Macro.

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Brussels Town Cemetery

Brussels Town Cemetery.  Brussels was in German hands from 20 August 1914 to the date of the Armistice. Plot X of the cemetery contains the graves of 54 Commonwealth casualties, 50 of which were prisoners of war whose bodies were brought back from Germany by the Canadian Corps in April 1919. The British Expeditionary Force was involved in the later stages of the defence of Belgium following the German invasion in May 1940, and suffered many casualties in covering the withdrawal to Dunkirk. Commo

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery Extension

Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery Extension.  Divisional Collecting Post Cemetery was begun by field ambulances of the 48th (South Midland) and 58th (London) Divisions in August 1917. It continued in use until January 1918 and at the Armistice contained 86 graves. Between 1924 and 1926, the original cemetery was considerably enlarged when graves were brought in from the surrounding battlefields and some small burial grounds in the area. The cemetery and extension essentially form a single site

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

Lt-Col Gerard Evelyn Leachman

Lt-Col Gerard Evelyn Leachman

Written for the Petersfield Post April 2019. Not easy to précis his life in 450 words! "In St Peters Church is a stained glass window depicting St Michael in armour.  It is dedicated to Lt-Colonel Gerard Leachman, one of the most colourful and courageous figures to have come out of Petersfield.He has been described as Petersfield’s Lawrence of Arabia, but while the self-promoting Lawrence became a legend, Leachman wrote little and is now largely forgotten.Born in 1880, he was the youngest child

pudsey63

pudsey63

 

22nd Battery Mobilises

On the Khyber, having pushed back the initial Afghan invasion, on 13th and 14th May 1919 the British advanced into Afghanistan to Loe Dakka. Meanwhile 22nd Battery, having recovered  from policing operations in the Punjab to Rawalpindi, was warned for further operations. On 14th May, the battery left Rawalpindi by train at 0200 hours, arriving in Kohat at 1300 hours the same day. The following day, 15th May, all the baggage cars, with the guns of Number 1 Section, formed a road convoy to move fo

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Policing in the Punjab (3) and the start of the Third Afghan War.

On 5th May 1919, Capt Ewing's mobile column marched in two parties to Harpoki on the Chenab Canal. The cavalry party moved across country. The other party, 22nd Battery Motor Machine Guns, "went along banks of canal, visiting village of Chiohoki Mallian. Camped at Harpoki the night." Although those involved in policing operations in the Punjab were almost certainly unaware,  the Afghans had already invaded India - on 3rd May they had crossed the frontier on the Khyber and captured the village of

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Patrolling the North West Frontier (5)

103 years ago in 1916, 22nd Battery Motor Machine Gun Service's thousand mile familiarisation patrol of the North West Frontier concluded.  In his letter to The Motor Cycle magazine Sgt Fielder concludes with masterly understatement; "On the 29th [April] we returned to Peshawar, the hardest climb in the whole journey. On May 1st we left Peshawar for Pindi, a distance of 117 miles, in the pouring rain, and so ended a month's hard travelling. Being the sergeant mechanic,  in charge, I had a fairly

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Policing in the Punjab (2)

Capt Ewing's evidence to the Disorders Enquiry Committee noted that on 29 April 1919 the "Motor Machine Gun Battery went to a village 57 miles away to make two arrests, returning same evening, distance 114 miles." On 1 May "Mobile column went to Sukeke where it picked up one troop of 18th Lancers having left one troop 19th Lancers, at Lyallpur. Motor Machine Gun Battery had to go on to Hafizabad to detain and come back by road. Camped Sukeke for the night."

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Patrolling the North West Frontier (4)

103 years ago in April 1916, 22nd Battery Motor Machine Gun Service continued their familiarisation patrol of the North West Frontier. Sgt Fielder's letter to "The Motor Cycle" continues: "On the 17th we left Kohat for Thal, a nice journey; distance sixty-one miles. On the 18th we left for Parachinar, right up on the hills, where it was very cold at night, snow being on the hills just above; distance fifty-nine miles. On the 19th we went field firing on the Afghan frontier, afterwards returning

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Policing in the Punjab

One hundred years ago, in April 1919, the Punjab was in flames.  Following the Amritsar massacre on 13 April, trouble had spread throughout Punjab. Railway lines were cut, telegraph posts destroyed, government buildings burnt and Europeans murdered. The British declared Martial Law on 15 April. When exactly 22nd Battery Motor Machine Gun Service became involved in policing operations is not clear - but they were involved by 19 April.  In evidence given to the Disorders Inquiry Committee, more wi

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Patrolling the North West Frontier (3)

Having patrolled up the Khyber Pass on 11 April 1916 to Landi Kotal Fort, 22nd Battery Motor Machine Gun Service returned to Peshawar the same day, a distance of 75 miles. Sgt Fielder commented in a letter to the Motor Cycle magazine, "The road was very dangerous, being twisty and right at the edge of the cliffs. On the 12th we were inspected by the Chief Commissioner, who was very satisfied with our work. On the 13th we went to Chubcudda [I cannot determine where this might be - can anyone help

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