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Remembered Today:

Unknown Captain: Royal Irish Rifles: Arras Road Cemetery 2.M.14


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This popped out while I was looking for other burial sites. It also caught my eye as my grandfather was a Captain in the Royal Irish Rifles at the time he was invited to spend some time with the Kaiser.

The exhumation location for this is 36.M.35.d.25.75 which is at Neuve Chapel. the 1st Bn. RIR was there from the 10th to 13th of March 1915 and in that precise location. You can see it on the Long, Long Trail map here in the woods just west of Armentieres Road. It is not close it is spot on!

The only Captain of the Royal Irish Rifles that is missing on that date is Captain Allan O'Halloran Wright, KIA March 13, 1915 and names on the Le Touret Memorial. He had a tobacco pouch and pipe in his pocket. He also had a silver watch.

Captain Wright was the Adjutant and a long serving military man as reported:

Quote
Son of late Frederick Wright, J.P., Consul of Adelaide, Australia, and of Frances J. Wright, of Clanfergael, Red Hill, Surrey. Served in the South African War. Served with the South Australian Mounted Rifles. Entered Sussex R.G.A. (M) in 1903, passed into Royal Irish Rifles, 1907.

Here are the documents for:

  1. Exhumation
  2. Concentration
  3. Grave Record

Here is where he was located and compare that to where the unit was on that day.

a89b87iry80i87z6g.jpg

 

UPDATE 17 December 2018: In the map below I initially had the date for the location of the 1st Bn R.I.R. on 3 March 1915. Clearly that should have said 13 March 1915 - my mistake. I have corrected the map. The details on the LLT are here: http://www.longlongtrail.co.uk/battles/battles-of-the-western-front-in-france-and-flanders/the-battle-of-neuve-chapelle/

 

locd6evmg84iy0s6g.jpg

Edited by laughton
map dated incorrectly - fixed and added note
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Laughton

I'm aware of the grave.

It is probably Captain Wright and there could be a positive outcome with the CWGC. The concern that I have is that there are two other officers from this battalion missing in the same area. It draws us back to the issues discussed in the Kipling case , the reliability of burial returns and the possibility of errors. In the end it fell short of what I would be willing to present to the CWGC.

Mick

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Mick:

I had checked that and so I assume you are talking about Lt. Hutcheson and 2nd Lieutenant Gilmore?

There is only one (1) Captain missing and that is Wright. If it just said OFFICER then I might agree but it is specific to a CAPTAIN.

Someone else might pick up the file, thanks for looking.

Richard

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Laughton

Yes the person who picks up this case will probably achieve a success.

Like you I have spent a considerable period of time in the past year working through the burial returns. What concerns me is those cases where a rank has been recorded against a unknown and then at a later stage when a name is attached to the casualty the original rank has then been corrected. For this reason I only work cases where there is only one possibility regardless of the rank.

Another separate issue is the reliability of the information recorded upon the CWGC website. While living in London a few years ago I spent my Saturdays working through the officer service records at Kew. I was consistently coming up against discrepancies particularly with issues relating to battalions. A man could be serving with one battalion and killed while attached to another and this is not always recorded on the CWGC website. This is why it's important to cross reference all the available documents. I'm not saying that any of these issues relate to this case but they do need to be checked.

All the best

Mick

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I don't have time at present to look into this but don't forget that 2nd R Irish Rifles fought over the same area in October 1914 and were wiped out.

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And he was a pipe smoker.

Wright Capt. Allan O’Halloran. Born at Mill Terrace, Rose Ward, Adelaide, 27.4.1886, the youngest son of Frederick Wright jp, Consul at Adelaide, Australia, and of Frances Jane Wright (daughter of Major Thomas Shuldham O’Halloran, 97th Regt) of Clanferzeal, Woodlands Road, Red Hill, Surrey. His father was a financial agent. His grandfather was Major, the Hon., T.S. O’Halloran. Educated at St Peter’s College, Adelaide, and at Bedford Grammar School. Although only fourteen years of age at the time, he served in the South African War with the South Australian Mounted Rifles, and received the Queen’s Medal with three clasps. In 1902 he joined the Bedford Royal Engineers (Volunteers), and was appointed to the Sussex Royal Garrison Artillery (Militia), 1903, and promoted Lt., 1905. From the Militia he was gazetted a 2/Lt. in 1st RIR, 29.5.1907, and promoted Lt., 22.1.1909. Served in India with 1st RIR and was Adjutant from 1.1.1913, being promoted T/Capt., 15.11.1914. Shot at 5.30 a.m., 13.3.1915. Mentioned in Despatches, 31.5.1915, for gallant and distinguished service in the field. He was extremely musical, composing military marches and other compositions, and went in extensively for polo and all sports. He was a qualified instructor of gunnery, musketry, signalling and scouts, being for several years Scout Officer of the battalion. Unmarried and died intestate. A WO telegram was sent to his sister, Helen, 16 March. Personal items to be returned included two pipes, one whistle, and two shrapnel pellets. A WO letter to the family, 14.6.1915, stated that he was buried at map reference Sheet 36 M.35.b3.0., which is just south of Lafone Redoubt, about 200 yards from the British front line. Peculiarly enough, the letter goes on to say that ‘this map can be obtained from any map shop’. Le Touret Memorial. File ref: WO339/6822 13486.

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Hi Everyone.

Concerning Captain Identification;

I have looked at the casualty lists on Geoffs Search Engine for "ALL" casualties belonging to the Royal Irish Rifles over a 3 day period, on the 12/03/1915 there were 28 casualties belonging to the 1st Battalion R.I.R and 3 of them were Officers, Captain Biscoe who has a grave, Lt Hutchinson on the LeTouret Memorial and Lt/Col Laurie who also has a grave.

13/03/1915 There were 10 casualties of the 1st Battalion R.I.R of which only 1 was an Officer Captain (Adjt) Wright the man at the centre of this debate.

14/03/1915 There were only 3 casualties belonging to the 1st Battalion R.I.R with no Officers becoming casualties.I think you are correct about it being Captain Wright,I look forward to your comments.

Kind Regards Andy

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Please do let me know if someone has or is going to pick up this case. In Canada, we send ours to the CWGC Agency in Ottawa for review (more or less Veterans Affairs and not the Department of Defence). My understanding of the UK situation is that you submit your reports to the Ministry of Defence. Please correct me if I am wrong.

Here are the requirements that the CWGC Maidenhead set for our cases:

  • Procedure: All new identification cases need to be assessed in the first instance by the Canadian Agency (CA) and submissions should go to their office directly. After an initial assessment, if the Agency feels that the case is compelling, they will then pass all the documentation to the Commemorations Team at the Commission's Head Office. Head Office will then review the case and inform the CA of their findings. The Canadian authorities will then decide whether or not any changes to the arrangements for commemoration are required and inform the Commission accordingly.
  • Guideline Criteria for Submission: Cases need to present clear and convincing evidence to prove the identity of a casualty and must not be based on assumption or speculation. The Commission's Commemoration Team will also consider whether the findings of a better informed contemporary investigation are being revisited and if there is any new evidence to consider. By way of example, it is unlikely that the Commission would support a revision of the arrangements for the commemoration where it is apparent that no new evidence is being presented and, a better informed previous decision is being revisited some 100 years later.

I was pleased this week that our first case in the new 2015 series was approved and a new headstone is being prepared for Corporal Martin Carroll at Villers-Bretonneaux Military Cemetery. His file is an example of the case report that we submit for our Canadian Unknowns.

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Richard

All British cases are initially submitted to the CWGC at Maidenhead.Their committee will then access the evidence which at this moment can take up to 6 months. You will then be notified of their decision and If they agree with the facts the report will then be forwarded to the British MoD. There is then a considerable period of time before this government body gives their final approval. If this is granted (which it generally is ) you will then be informed of this decision by the CWGC. There will then be an attempt to locate any next of kin before any service is organised.This entire procedure can take up to five years.

Mick

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Just so everyone is aware, the case has been picked up by a British team. I will leave it to them to post their details here. Great news!

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Here is Wright with his pipe. The photo was taken at Meerut, India, in 1907.

Jimmypost-39-0-00199300-1458679493_thumb.jpg

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  • 8 months later...

Has a submission been prepared and submitted on this case? I did not hear back.

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  • 1 year later...

Now that I have access to the UK war diaries on Ancestry, I am returning to a number of these older topics (cases) that were left "dangling". As the posts above detail, there are two options for the UNKNOWN BRITISH OFFICER (CAPTAIN - Royal Irish Rifles) in Plot 2 Row M Grave 14 of the Arras Road Cemetery, Roclincourt. In both cases the Royal Irish RIfles were in the area and there is one (1) Captain on the Le Touret Memorial for each occurence.

  1. The Captain may be from the action in October 1914 when the Germans first took the area of Aubers and Neuve Chapelle. There is evidence that the remains could be those of Captain Henry Ouseley Davis, of the 5th Battalion Royal Irish RIfles, attached to the 2nd Battalion, died 27 October 1914:
    • Although I have not found specific trench map coordinates, the War Diary of 26-27 October 1914 (page 84 of 177) tells us the 2nd Battalion was in the trenches at Neuve Chapelle (36.M.35.c), having been ordered to move up to them from Richebourg-St. Vaast (36 .S.2.c). From the details provided for 22 October (page 80 of 177), we know that the Bn HQ and reserve company were in the Chateau, near the road fork at the north end of the village of Neuve Chapelle (there is a Chateau redoubt marked at 36.M.35.c.85.40). We know the trenches were in front of the village to the east, as during the attack at 7 am on 27 October 1914 the men were obliged to retire into the village of Neuve Chapelle, 250 yards in the rear (page 84 of 177). I believe the front line trench references was the SMITH DORIEN TRENCH, between Bois du Biez and the village.
    • Captain Davis was reported being killed at 11 am on the morning of 27 October 1914 (page 85 of 177). He was not one of the men that got back to the village. It was noted he was a "Special Reserve Officer" (i.e. attached from the 5th Battalion).
    • The "History of the Royal Irish Rifles" tells us that the 2nd Royal Irish Rifles were to hold the village of New Chapelle on 22 October 1914 (page 30 of 245). It is noted that three of companies dug trenches on the eastern skirts of the village, the fourth held in reserve in the school. The enemy first attacked Neuve Chapelle at about 5 pm on 24 October 1914, which was repulsed - except for houses captured on the left flank (that would be the north side). On the morning of 26 October it is reported that the enemy swept into the village from the northeast corner (page 31 of 245). The next morning, Captain Davis was killed, after the battalion had withdrawn to the western outskirts of the village. I estimate that this would place them in the vicinity of 36.S.5.a2.8, about 700 yards southwest of where the remains were recovered at 36.M.d.25.75.
    • I have no information on Captain Davis that would tell me whether or not he was a pipe smoker, or if there were any additional details on his location when he fell or his battlefield burial site. This might be something that can be extracted from has Officer's Records? The records have not been digitized and therefore I can not download them.
       
  2. The Captain may be from the British attack to recover the area in March 1915. There is strong evidence for this being Captain Allan O'Halloran Wright, Adjutant of the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, died 13 March 1915:
    • COG-BR 2229655 indicates the remains were exhumed from 36.M.35.d.25.75 which compares very closely to where the reported battlefield burial site of Captain Wright was noted at 36.M.35.b.3.0 (see post #6 above telling of the burial location in a letter from the War Office). That is a separation distance of only 125 yards over a period from the burial in March 1916 to the recovery in November 1928. I am not exactly certain how they determined the location in either case, I assume on the basis of landmarks relative to what is on the trench map. An interesting question to resolve.
    • As initially stated in post#1 above, "the exhumation location for this is  which is at Neuve Chapelle. the 1st Bn. RIR was there from the 10th to 13th of March 1915 and in that precise location. You can see it on the Long, Long Trail map here in the woods just west of Armentieres Road".
    • SP-EXH 2229643 tells us "tobacco pouch and pipe were also found on the body. This is ? that he was a pipe smoker". The same post #6 above tells us that "Personal items to be returned included two pipes, one whistle, and two shrapnel pellets". The fact that Captain Wright was confirmed in the picture provided above in post #11, showing him with his pipe in India in 1907.
    • Information on the 1st Battalion RIR at this time appears in the War Diary of the 25th Infantry Brigade. The first item discovered is that there were no Officers killed in any of the 25th Brigade Battalions on 13 March 1915 (page 200 of 751). Going back to the 12th it appears there were 24 officer casualties, including 8 in the 1st RIR (page 199 of 751).  It is reported that the 2nd Rifle Brigade and 1st Royal Irish Rifles suffered severely on that day. The bombardment of the enemy was ineffective and the attack at 4:30 pm failed completely.
    • The narrative of the 1st Battalion Royal Irish Rifles is contained within the 25th Infantry Brigade war diary (page 211 of 751). At 9 am on 12 March 1915 the battalion took up its position in orchards in the triangle of Neuve Chapelle, which was under bombardment by "Jack Johnsons". Four (4) Officers were killed that day but it was not until 13 March 1915 that Captain Wright "was shot going round the trenches with the C.O.", which I believe was Major V. H. Baker (page 214 of 751).
    • The detailed section of the Brigade War Diary tells us that the 1st Battalion RIR was in areas marked as 5, 91, 13 and 15  (page 231 of 751), which coincide with the sketch provided (page 250 of 751). That sketch shows the 1st RIR forming up trenches as points 1, 2, 3 and 4, in the area marked "A" depicted later (page 259 of 751 and page 333 of 751). Details of the Village of Neuve Chapelle are provided (page 312 of 751), to which the numbers "#" apply. A detailed map (north and south run left to right) is provided with all the numbers (page 344 of 751) - now to link them all togehter!

 

See also this topic on the GWF from April 2010: Neuve Chapelle, 26-29th October 1914. Unfortunately this member last visited in October 2012 so it is unlikely I can get additional details on his/her research.

 

Two items appear critical to me to continue with this case:

  1. Getting a more exact location where Captain Davis was when he was killed, if he was 700 yards southwest of where the remains were recovered.
  2. Determining if there is any evidence that Captain Davis was also a pipe smoker.

 

Not to be forgotten, as it has happened already in the past 2 years, finding the burial location of the "other RIR Captain".  In March 2015 we were sure we had the remains identified of Lieutenant Donald Wallace McDonald (St. Mary's ADS Cemetery) of the 15th Battalion CEF, lost at Hill 70 in August 1917, but two Lieutenants were missing so we needed more proof. Almost a year later we discovered what we believed were the remains of the other missing 15th Battalion Officer, Lieutenant James Archibald Wylie, (Loos British Cemetery). The trench map coordinates proved the point and the reports were submitted to the CWGC. We were not looking for Lieutenant Wylie, rather we were trying to find where 2nd Lieutenant Parkenham-Law might be buried if it really was Lieutenant Kipling in St. Mary's with Lieutenant McDonald (see story details). Sometimes you just get lucky!

 

Edited by laughton
found and added information for 1st Bn RIR war diary
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  • 11 months later...

Here is what I have for Davis

 

Davis Capt. Henry Ouseley. Born 15.9.1884 at Church Road, Holywood, Co. Down, the eldest son of Henry Davis, merchant and manufacturer of ladies wearing apparel, and Mary née Ouseley. His father was from King’s County and his mother from Dublin. Educated at Portora Royal School, Enniskillen, September 1896 to July 1900; Belfast Mercantile College, September–December 1900; Campbell College, January 1901 to November 1903. Applied for admission to Sandhurst 31.8.1903. Address Abingdon, Holywood. The 1911 census shows him living with his widowed mother who was manager of the family business, his brother Frederick José (24) was Secretary, and Henry (26) was assistant manager. Other siblings were Mary Louise (20) and Harold Newell (17). He was a member of the HQ Staff of the UVF at Craigavon and approached Campbell College in that capacity, 26.3.1914, to ask if it might be used as a hospital if civil war broke out. By July 1914 medical supplies were moved in and UVF nurses practised in the school’s sanatorium. Davis was asked to guard the school over the summer against attacks – not from military incursions, but from suffragettes. Joined 2nd RIR from 3rd RIR 10.10.1914.

   Bond of Sacrifice: ‘ … a great-grandson of the late Major-General Sir Ralph Ouseley … He was gazetted to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers in August, 1905, and posted to the 2nd Battalion, becoming Lieutenant in June, 1908. His recreations were cricket and golf. He resigned his commission in 1910, and on the outbreak of the war was gazetted Captain in the 5th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles at the end of August, 1914, being attached to the 2nd Battalion for service in September. He was killed in action by shrapnel on the 27th October, 1914.’

   Letter from José, 11.4.1921, advised that he had received a letter from the Imperial War Graves Commission asking for details of Henry’s height, build, colour of hair and any physical peculiarities that may assist in establishing his identity. He enquired as to where he could get this information. He issued a reminder, 30.4.1921, then wrote to the Secretary of State for War, 9.5.1921, enclosing copies of the two letters to the WO and asked him to resolve the matter. A letter from IWGC, 25.5.1921, said that papers only show Henry’s height; if José had any further particulars regarding physical description he should forward them. An IWGC letter to Sir Edward Carson explained that their intention had been to open a grave to try to get an identification, which was why they had asked for the information. Memorial plaque in Holywood Parish Church. Le Touret Memorial. File ref: 339/6278.

 

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This does appear on my list as a POSSIBLE CWGC REPORT: https://www.greatwarforum.org/blogs/entry/1750-categories-of-the-unknown-cases/

 

 

I don't have any information about the "British Team" that was going to handle this case. There is no mention of a report on David Avery's list. The only case for Arras Road Cemetery is for Lieutenant Wilfred Ashton Piercy in 2.D.13. If anyone has knowledge about a report being prepared, please let me know.

 

The exhumation that was completed was in 1928 so I doubt it was the same one as in the letters mentioned above. They would not have been able to open the grave of this UNKNOWN in 1921 as he had not been found yet. That means there is a grave somewhere in the system with a Unknown RIR Captain!

 

It sure would be useful to knew what was the case the CWGC was investigation in 1921! It does not appear that they asked if he was a pipe smoker.

 

Time has taught me to also search for the man with the regimental association as a "Secondary Regiment", which brings up two more (CWGC Link). Captains Miles and MacIlwaine would need to be checked out.

 

 

 
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16 hours ago, laughton said:

Time has taught me to also search for the man with the regimental association as a "Secondary Regiment", which brings up two more (CWGC Link). Captains Miles and MacIlwaine would need to be checked out.

 

Turns out that there is a candidate from that check. Captain Arthur Grove Colles from the Royal Dublin Fusiliers was attached to the 1st Bn Royal Irish Rifles when he was KIA on 12 March 1915. This brings us back to that age old questions as to whether the attached officer would be bearing any insignia suggesting that he was an Officer in the Royal Irish Rifles or would he only be wearing the insignia of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers? My understanding is the latter, he would be wearing his original uniform and numerals. His death is recorded (war diary page 213 of 751), as it states (when typos corrected) "Capt. Colles who volunteered to cut the wire was killed".

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On 08/03/2016 at 10:37, Jimmy Taylor said:

I don't have time at present to look into this but don't forget that 2nd R Irish Rifles fought over the same area in October 1914 and were wiped out.

 

Back looking at the COG-BR documents and you are most certainly correct! I noticed this document for Corporal J. Altman #9756, KIA 24 October 1914 in the near exact location 36.M.35.d.40.05. He was also concentrated to the Arras Road Cemetery, Roclincourt in 1928.

 

doc2229662.JPG

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Here are the details, including burial, for Capt A.G.Colles

Colles Capt. Arthur Grove. Born 12.2.1891 at 3 Elgin Road, Dublin, the only son of Alexander and Georgina Caroline Colles (daughter of Robert George Cullin). His father was Registrar of the Petty Sessions Office, Dublin Castle. Educated at Cheadle Hulme School and St Andrew’s College, Dublin. Joined 4th RDF as a 2/Lt., 11.11.1910, being promoted to Lt., April 1912, and Capt., December 1914. He had been attached for a year to the Connaught Rangers at the Curragh. Went to the front with 1st RIR and was gazetted to that battalion, 2.3.1915. Killed by machine gun fire, 12.3.1915, while cutting barbed wire. Bond of Sacrifice: ‘In March 1915, he was gazetted to the 1st (Regular) Battalion of the Royal Irish Rifles as 2nd Lieutenant. 2nd Lieutenant Colles had been four months in the trenches.’ Irish Life 14.5.1915: ‘In November last he was sent to the front with 1st Battalion, Royal Irish Rifles, to which regiment he was subsequently gazetted. Since he went out he had been continuously in the trenches until his last action.’ Irish Times 20.3.1915: ‘No details are so far to hand but a fellow officer writes to say that the last he saw of him was “charging for all he was worth at the head of his men, taking Neuve Chapelle”.’ Mother notified by telegram 17 March. The list of personal effects submitted by Capt. G.W. Edwards, 22 March, included a silver cigarette case and a leather purse containing a locket. Unmarried. A WO letter, 14.6.1915, stated his place of burial as Sheet 36 Belgium, Square M.35.D. – the orchard of the chateau at Neuve Chapelle. Le Touret Memorial, Pas de Calais. Named on the Cheadle Hulme School War Memorial, Manchester, as [Arthur] Grove Colles. Commemorated in St Bartholomew’s Church of Ireland, Ballsbridge, Dublin. File ref: 44764.

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Thanks for that information. A cigarette smoker and no mention of any pipe accessories.

 

I was not aware that the ORCHARD at the CHATEAU was a burial ground, so it was not necessarily where they fell but rather where they were buried. It may have only been officers that were buried there, in which case if they exhumed one they probably exhumed them all. I will check all the COG-BR documents for those concentrations.

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Here is another one from the same location in 2.N.14. That was the last one in the re-check of the Arras Road Cemetery, Roclincourt.

 

This was an interesting review that acknowledged that the IWGC used "currently open cemeteries" for concentrations from a wide area at specified times. Clearly in the period around 1928, this cemetery was receiving concentrations from all over France - dates ranging from 1914 through to the final months of 1918. There are Canadians here from the initial indoctrinations at Bois-Grenier in February-March 1915, right through to the final days in the Battle of Arras in September 1918.

 

doc1966373.JPG

 

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  • 1 year later...
On 17/12/2018 at 19:32, Jimmy Taylor said:

Here are the details, including burial, for Capt A.G.Colles

 

@Jimmy Taylor I am trying to figure out what happened to Colles, following along with the information that you provided in post #18. I went back to the London Gazette and that only made it more confusing!

This makes it appear that he was made a Captain in the RDF in December 1914 and then demoted to a Second Lieutenant and transferred (not attached) at that lower rank to the Royal Irish Rifles. I suspect those details must be in his Officer File if it exists? Did the CWGC, as they so often have recorded, put him back in the database at the higher rank?

 

This may turn out to be a moot point, as far as this case goes, as I also did some follow-up on the other Captains. The one that caught me by surprise was Captain Thomas James Reynolds, 2nd Bn RIR. He was killed in action 2 days prior to Captain Davis, also 2nd Bn RIR, and has a known burial in Guards Cemetery, Windy Corner, Cuinchy. He is the only other one I found with a COG-BR 2007644 and it revealed he was recovered very close to the remains of the Unknown Captain at 36.M.35.d.4.7. That clearly places the Officers of 1914 in close proximity to those from 1915, as you first reported in post #5.

 

This is the first time Volume 2 of the UKNA DVD series has come in handy, as it had a much better trench map of that area. I have marked the locations.

 

I would say that Captain Wright is still the prime candidate because of the pipe smoker evidence, but there is a residual question as to why they returned "two pipes, one whistle, and two shrapnel pellets" (your post #6) and left one pipe and the pouch of tobacco with the remains? Perhaps it was a courtesy, to leave him with what he treasured? He is also reported buried north of where the remains were recovered, so which is the more accurate set of coordinates? In the case of Captain Davis, the war diary suggests he was to the west-southwest of Neuve Chapelle on 27 October 1914, some distance away from where Captain Reynolds' remains were recovered. There is no proof of where Captain Davis was buried, at least not from the research to date. There is no evidence either way concerning Captain Davis as a pipe smoker.

 

854660247_UKNADVD2locationsmarked.jpg.1a01540359e31e2aede15567f9af3566.jpg

 

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