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laughton

I checking on the sole UNKNOWN Canadian soldier in this cemetery (Plot 8 Row D Grave 1) who must be an Airman, as there were no ground troops in that area (Sailly-Saillisell 57c.U.7.b.1.8). I downloaded and prepared the ZIP files with all the GRRF and COG-BR documents, which I posted to the CEFSG:

 

Quote

I have added the ZIP files for the GRRF and COG-BR files for the Asservillers New British Cemetery in the Somme.

Download Link

There is one UCS in Plot 13 Row D Grave 10, but I have not had a look at the details as of yet - back shortly.

UPDATE:

The text in Norm Christie's book is incorrect on page 56 of Sacred Places Volume 3:
 

  • James Watterson PPCLI #54 is in Plot 1 Row G Grave 3 and not in Plot 8 Row D Grave 10. See GRRF 1966626 and COG-BR 1966678.
     
  • The UNKNOWN CANADIAN is not in Plot 13 Row D Grave 10, in fact there is no Plot 13 in this cemetery. That initial error is probably a typo using an "X" instead of a "V" for the plot number. However, he is not in Grave 10 anywhere. The UCS is actually in Plot 8 Row D Grave 1. This error occurred because many of the sheets had the grave numbers reversed in the transfer from the COG-BR to the GRRF. See GRRF 1966658 and COG-BR 1966834. Here the error carried on further because reliance was made on the basis of the COG-BR but the GRRF was not checked to see if that was changed. The UNKNOWN CANADIAN must be an Airforce Unknown as he was located at 57c.U.7.b.1.8, which is near Sailly-Saillisell, some distance to the south east of Courcelette. To the best of my knowledge there were no Canadian Infantry units in that area during the war.


In the last case, I have to admit that I have made that mistake myself, most significantly where the COG-BR says the man is UNKNOWN but on the GRRF he is identified.

There are a number of interesting British, Australian and South African cases in this cemetery. I will post those to the GWF.

 

The cases that may be of interest to GWF members are as follows:

 

  • Plot 1 Row B Grave 2 - an Unknown Manchester Corporal at 62c.O.3.b.8.9 - there are many men of the Regiment in this cemetery, many classed as "Known to Be Buried".
     
  • For Trevor, there are two British Airmen, probably a crew, found at 62c.O.2.b.8.1 that had a German Cross. They are buried beside each other in Plot 1 Row B Graves 3 and 4:
    GRRF 1966622
    COG-BR 1966773
     
  • Also for Trevor, there are two (2) Airmen that both have the reference R.47. One of them is in Plot 2 Row A Grave 2 found at 62c.N.32.d.1.2:
    GRRF 1966626
    COG-BR 1966679
    and the other is in Plot 4 Row A Grave 3 found at 62c.N.31.d.2: (so missing a number on grid reference)
    GRRF 1966634 (says "3.Air.Sqdn.R.47")
    COG-BR 1966791
     
  • Lastly for Trevor is the RFC 2nd Lieutenant in Plot 3 Row D Grave 3 found at 62c.M.14.c.8.4:
    GRRF 1966633
    COG-BR 1966789 (says he is R1 Royal Flying Corps)
     
  • I had never heard of the "Civil Service Rifles" but there is an Unknown 2nd Lieutenant in Plot 9 Row D Grave 6 who was found at 57c.V.6.b.3.6.  I thought I could link him to the known CCR man in Plot D Row D Grave 1, however his name and number are not on the CWGC database and he was changed to a UBS between the COG-BR and the GRRF. They are both on the same COG-BR page:
    COG-BR 1966848
    GRRF 1966665 & GRRF 1966670
     
  • For the South African War Graves Project (Ralph) there are a few boys in 7.F.9 and 7.F.10 and then a group in Plot 12 Row F Graves 4 through 9:
    COG-BR 1966843
    COG-BR 1966847
     

There are others that you can see if you download the ZIP files from the link provided in the initial quote of my CEFSG posting.

Edited by laughton

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thetrenchrat22

The Civil Service Rifles were the 15th (County of London) Battalion, London Regiment (Prince of Wales Own Civil Service Rifles).  A pre war Territorial Force unit made up of Civil Servants from government departments across London.  Looking at cemetery in question,  there are a number of civil service rifles graves in there and looking at there dates of death.  I would say the grave is that of 2nd/Lt Alick Guyer Aylmer Aylmore who was killed in action on 23rd March 1918. 

 

Alan

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laughton

Looks good for those dates. I went back into February and forward into April, so he is the only one not accounted for in FRANCE for that period.

 

Do you have information that they were never in that area at any other time? If we are going to report this then we need to be able to state that to be fact.

 

We would also need the War Diary for that period.

 

03w7dx8qo7qffa76g.jpg

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laughton

Found them on Chris's web site - search engine worked perfectly! 

Quote

1/15th (County of London) Battalion (Prince of Wales’s Own Civil Service Rifles)
August 1914 : at Somerset House. Part of 4th London Brigade, 2nd London Division. Moved on mobilisation to Bedmond, and then in November to billets at Watford.
18 March 1915 : landed at Le Havre.
11 May 1915 : formation became 140th Brigade in 47th (2nd London) Division.

 

It would appear, but we would need facts, that the Brigade and Division were not in the Bapaume area other than in 1918:

Quote

1918
The Battle of St Quentin**
The First Battle of Bapaume**
The Battle of the Ancre**
** the battles marked ** are phases of the First Battles of the Somme 1918
The Battle of Albert***
The Second Battle of Bapaume*** 
*** the battles marked *** are phases of the Second Battles of the Somme 1918
The operations in Artois^ including the official entry into Lille
^ the battle marked ^ is a phase of the Final Advance in Artois

The forward units of the Division reached Franses-lez-Buissenal / Moustier, north of Leuze, on 10 November 1918. Next day the Division marched back to Tournai and on 26 November moved on to the Bethune area. Not selected to join the Army of Occupation, the demobilisation of the Division began and the first parties moved to England 1-10 January 1919. By 28 March it was down to cadre level. The Division reformed as part of the Territorial Army in April 1920.

The order of battle of the 47th (2nd London) Division

140th (4th London) Brigade  
1/13th Bn, the London Regiment left November 1914
1/14th Bn, the London Regiment left September 1914

1/15th Bn, the London Regiment

(laughton: the remainder of the ORBAT is not included in this post)

 

Does anyone have a copy of:

 

The History Of The 47Th (London) Division 1914-1919: 47Th (London) Division 1914-1919 Paperback – 13 Feb 2009

by Alan H. Maude (Editor)

 

Following the long, long trail then I presume it was the "First Battle of Bapaume" where he would have been killed (remember this is a Canadian treading into British Operations without adequate training!) That puts them in the Third Army under Bing and in the heart of the action on 24-25 March 1918. Chris notes "Those men who died in this battle and have no known grave are commemorated on the Arras and Pozières Memorials, for Third and Fifth Armies respectively."

 

The unit landed in France in May of 1915, so is it possible that they were also in the Bapaume area (albeit it would have to be some distance to the southeast) in the Battle of the Somme 1916? The CWGC site tells us that there were four (4) Second Lieutenants killed in the area in mid-September 1916. Only one of those Bertram Knight War is on the Thiepval Memorial, so that does mean they were in the area. From where the known 2nd Lieutenants were buried, it appears they were in the area southeast of Albert and/or due south of Bapaume in the 1916 battles. It would appear that they were never as far east as Etricourt and it was past there that the remains were found. By the Second Battles of the Somme 1918 the 47th Division was in the Fourth Army under Rawlinson. In that period of August-September 1918, there are two (2) UNKNOWN Civil Service 2nd Lieutenants on the Vis-en-Artois Memorial. That only tells us that they fell after 8 August 1918 and not where they fell, so those will need to be checked (Hughes and Garrett).

 

The fact that all the others fell in the same area (i.e. Pte. E. W. Smith #535206) makes it obvious that it was March 1918, but the CWGC insists on confirmation of all the options. This is the COG-BR sheet with the 2nd Lieutenant and the others that were all recovered from the same area:

 

doc1966848.JPG

 

If you have not seen our format for the CWGC reports, for which they have given their blessing, you can link to all of them from here:

 

http://laughton.ca/publications/unknown-project/

 

The Canadians are linked to the CEFRESEARCH site and the OTHERS stayed on my site, as the CEFSG only deals with those in the Canadian Expeditionary Force or Airmen and Naval that were Canadian serving under the British authorities. Lieutenant Eaves report is a good example of what we need to do:

  1. Lieutenant Eaves Warlencourt British Cemetery Plot 5 Row K Grave 20 (19 January 2017 – CWGC Case No. 365)

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thetrenchrat22

The regimental history states that Bertram Ware was killed in Drop Alley in the High Wood Area.  Robert Hughes would have been killed in the area of Bois des Tailles, just north of the village of Bray.  Maurice Garrett was killed somewhere in the area around Rancourt, St. Pierre Vaast Wood, Moislams 

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thetrenchrat22

If there bodies were recovered but as unknowns Ware could be in London Cemetery & Extension, High Wood.  Hughes could be in either Bray Hill British Cemetery or Bray Military Cemetery or Bray Vale Cemetery.  Garrett could be in a Cemetery around the Rancourt area 

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laughton
1 hour ago, thetrenchrat22 said:

The regimental history states that Bertram Ware was killed in Drop Alley in the High Wood Area.  Robert Hughes would have been killed in the area of Bois des Tailles, just north of the village of Bray.  Maurice Garrett was killed somewhere in the area around Rancourt, St. Pierre Vaast Wood, Moislams 

 

We are looking for action in 57c.V.6 sector, here is what the ones above reveal:

 

Drop Alley: 57c.M.29.d.05.90 more or less, between Martinpuich and Flers, so that eliminates that as an option for the area of the Unknowns. That is 4,000 yards to the west.

 

Bois des Tailles. Bray: not on my DVD set and the McMaster site is down. If as it appears that it is in the area of 51c.F.20 then it is also excluded. (Site back up, I can see the Village of Bray but not the woods at 51c.F.20.b.1.8 or is that the wrong place?

 

St. Pierre Vaast Wood, Rancourt: 62C.C.3.b.5.2 to the central part of the wood. Most definitely that one is excluded.

 

I will start drafting a report. I include all the researchers names and contact information in the final attachment to the report so that CWGC can make direct contact. Can you send me that by PM? I will need references for the information provided above or are they all from the history book from Maud?

Edited by laughton
I was not finished!

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thetrenchrat22

Tailles wood is west of Bray Sur Somme and East of Morlancourt.  Map Reference 62D NE. K.  12 & 18 & 23b and 24a

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laughton

To place them in the general area, see map below followed by a list of other men of the regiment KIA at the same time and buried in the Assevillers New British Cemetery. I think it is important that we have a page or two from the war diary that states that is the area where the regiment was located on 23 March 1918. There was another topic about the unit on the GWF, but there is no mention of the war diary. Does anyone have access?

 

kcd1hbme0xyxn4k6g.jpg

 

The other ten (10) in the Assevillers New British Cemetery a

 

surname initials death rank regiment # grave
BELLINGHAM, M.M. F S 22-03-18 Corporal 15th Bn. '530889' IX. D. 10.
ELLIOTT P J 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '531691' IX. D. 2.
FYFE J C 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '535123' VII. G. 6.
JEFFERY W E 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '533567' XII. G. 5.
JENVEY S H 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '536611' X. D. 2.
NEVES W H 23-03-18 Private "D" Coy. '535234' X. D. 5.
PILKINGTON O F 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '535213' IX. D. 1.
REDCLIFFE F R 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '535405' VII. G. 7.
SMITH E W 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '535206' X. D. 3.
WILLIAMS H E 23-03-18 Private 15th Bn. '532674' X. D. 4.

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laughton

I now have the war diary page for the 23 March 1918 listing the casualties. That shows that the two Officer casualties of that date were both reported missing (Lt. Walter Victor Mantach Broad and 2nd Lt. Alick Guyer Aylmer Aylmore). I guess I should check the rest of the cemetery for any sign of Lt. Broad - or is t hat him 2 lines above Aylmore as the UNKNOWN BRITISH OFFICER? Lt. Broad is one of 57 Lieutenants lost that specific day, many of who are listed as UNKNOWN. There were also 16 Majors and 41 Captains, so it would be a task to check them all BUT IT CAN BE DONE! Lt. Broad is quite possibly the only one in that precise area.

 

They were in 57c.V.6 central, exactly where the remains were found, more precisely on the LEFT of the Mens-Fins Road, which is shown below on the clip from the McMaster 57c trench map.

 

I believe that clinches this case and it can go to the CWGC.

 

36czzka9dokfvbt6g.jpg

 

0hhkn2uhkn8gane6g.jpg

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laughton

Here is the 1st draft of my report, however I must confirm that I have the correct name of my mysterious research assistant (thetrenchrat22)!  It has to be AG? This is just the text here but you can retrieve the document with all the attachments here:

 

http://www.mediafire.com/file/koxqilnmvx9hjf1/2nd_Lieutenant_Alick_Aylmore_Assevillers_New_British_Cemetery_PLot_9_Row_D_Grave_6.pdf

 

 INVESTIGATIVE REPORT:

 

This report pertains to an investigation of the identification of the burial location of a member of the Commonwealth Forces, during the Great War 1914-1921.
 

SUBMITTED TO:

 

CWGC Commemorations Section

Commonwealth War Graves Commission
2 Marlow Road

Maidenhead, Berkshire

SL6 7DX United Kingdom

Email: commemorations@cwgc.org

 

 

Report Date: 20 April 2017

 

Reason for Submission: (“X” means purpose of the report)

 

Casualty Identification:

 

Burial Information:

 

Confirmed Identity

x

Burial Location Identified

x

Most Probable Identity

 

Grave Stone Correction

 

Questionable Identity

 

Grave Records Correction

 

Incorrect Identity

 

Request for CWGC Details

 

Other

 

Other

 

 

Supporting Documents: (# refers to attachment number; “I” information provided)

 

Casualty Identification:

 

Burial Information:

 

Aylmore, Alick Guyer Aylmer

i

Assevillers New British

link

1-15th Bn. London Regiment

i

Somme, France

i

2nd Lieutenant

i

Plot 9 Row D Grave 6

i

Death: 23 March 1918

link

Burial: 12 December 1920

i

Graves Registration Report

1

War Diary Extract(s)

7

Concentration of Grave

2

Other Casualties Buried

8

Exhumation Report

 

Grave Stone Photograph

 

Headstone Register

3

Grave Stone Inscription

 

Area Map(s)

4

Memorial Inscription/Photo

 

Trench Map(s)

5

Reporting and Review

9

Possible Candidates List

6

Other

 

 

Summary of Findings:

 

The Graves Registration Report form for Plot 9 Row D Grave 6 at the Assevillers New British Cemetery lists an Unknown  2/Lt Civil Service Rifles, known formally as “1/15th (County of London) Battalion (Prince of Wale’s Own Civil Service Rifles”.

 

A review of all the evidence clearly shows that 2nd Lieutenant Alick Aylmore was the only candidate that was at this location and has no known grave. He was killed in action on 23 March 1918 on the left of the Mens-Fins Road, southwest of Bapaume in the Somme area of France.

 

 

 


Details of Findings:

 

The findings are conclusive that the remains in Plot 9 Row D Grave 6 are those of Second Lieutenant Alick Guyer Aylmer Aylmore of the London Regiment (Prince of Wales Own Civil Service Rifles). He is the ONLY Second Lieutenant of the Battalion that was in this location and has an UNKNOWN GRAVE, at any time during the Great War.

 

The findings are based on the following:

 

1.    The Grave Registration Report Form (GRRF) lists an Unknown British Officer, 2/Lt. of the Civil Service Rifles, buried in Plot 9 Row D Grave 6 (Attachment #1). We know that the Civil Service Rifles were the 1/15th (County London Battalion) (Price of Wales Own Civil Service Rifles). The cemetery holds a number of other men of the same battalion. The names and dates of the known men provide strong evidence that all these men were the result of action in the area in March 1918 during the German Advance known as “Operation Michael”.
 

2.    The Concentration of Graves (Exhumations and Reburials) Burial Return (COG-BR) shows that the remains of the Unknown Second Lieutenant were found in amongst a number of other men of the unit, plus others killed in the same location in March 1918 (Attachment #2). The trench map coordinates for the remains were given as 57c.V.6.b.3.6. That location tells us the remains were found north of Fins, France.
 

3.    The CWGC Headstone Register initially recorded “A Second Lieutenant of the Great War P.W.O. Civil Service Rifles” (Attachment #3). This was later changed to “A Soldier, Unknown Second Lieutenant, P.W.O Civil Service Rifles”. There was no change in the status of the Officer as an unknown.
 

4.    The Civil Service Rifles were in the precise area where the remains were found in March of 1918. The general area is shown on a map extract from the Lloyd Reeds Map Collection of McMaster University (Attachment #4). The area is to the southeast of Bapaume, France in the Somme sector.
 

5.    A detailed trench map of the location of the remains show that they are to the west (left) of the Mens-Fin Road, exactly where the Civil Service Rifles were in action on 23 March 1918, when Second Lieutenant Aylmore was killed in action (Attachment #5). The trench map coordinates are 57c.V.6.b.3.6.
 

6.    The casualty records of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission were searched for all Second Lieutenants of the Civil Service Rifles who were killed in the Great War of 1914-1921 and have no known grave (Attachment #6). The list shows there were ten (10) Second Lieutenants, each of which can be tied to a specific battle and location based on the date of their death. We have marked the table of candidates with that information. Second Lieutenant Alick Aylmore was the only unknown candidate that was in the area where the remains were found at any time during the war.

 

7.    The war diary of March 1918 for the Civil Service Rifles confirms that they were in the location where the remains were found on March 23, 1918 (Attachment #7). Missing at that time and later confirmed killed in action were Lieutenant Broad and Second Lieutenant Aylmore.
 

8.    The research material shows that there were ten (10) other men of the Civil Service Rifles that were killed in action at the same location, at the same time and have known graves in the Assevillers New British Cemetery. Three (3) of those men are buried in the same plot and row as the Unknown Second Lieutenant.

 

 


Action Required:

 

The “Investigative Report” has been prepared in accordance with the procedures and criteria set out by the CWGC, should they wish to make any changes to the commemoration details (Attachment #9).

 

It is our contention that the evidence is overwhelming and that this is the grave of Second Lieutenant Alick Guyer Aylmer Aylmore. Quite simply, there are no other qualified candidates.

 

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thetrenchrat22

Richard

 

PM sent with my details

 

Alan 

thetrenchrat22

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laughton

Good, now it is confirmed that the information came from Alan Gregson. Alan has also confirmed that the Civil Service Rifles were in Belgium during the Spring 1917 Arras Offensive, so I have added the following to point #6 in the report:

Quote

In May 1917 when the Arras Offensive was underway in France, the Civil Service Rifles were at Swan Chateau, in the Dickiebusch are of Belgium, to the southwest of Ypres (Map Coordinates 28.H.19.c).

This accounts for the whereabouts of 2nd Lieutenants Smith, Clarke, Coldicott, Jamieson. In November 1917 the battalion was in the area of __________, which accounts for 2nd Lieutenants Marchant and Tatum.

We have marked the table of candidates with that information. Second Lieutenant Alick Aylmore was the only unknown candidate that was in the area where the remains were found at any time during the war.

 

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thetrenchrat22

Richard

 

PM sent with further details 

 

Alan

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thetrenchrat22

Taken from the All Bloody Gentleman by Jill Knight

IMG_0184.JPG

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laughton

Alan:

 

Would it be possible for you to scan the pages from the two (2) books that you have used in this research and email them to me? I will create a new attachment for the report with that information, particularly as we do not have all the war diary pages. Please also scan the page with the book details or send me the text to put in the reference.

 

Thanks as always,

 

Richard

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laughton

I have modified the text in POINT #6 of the report, providing information on the location of the Regiment:

 

Quote

The casualty records of the Commonwealth War Graves Commission were searched for all Second Lieutenants of the Civil Service Rifles who were killed in the Great War of 1914-1921 and have no known grave (Attachment #6). The list shows there were ten (10) Second Lieutenants, each of which can be tied to a specific battle and location based on the date of their death. In May 1917 when the Arras Offensive was underway in France, the Civil Service Rifles were at Swan Chateau, in the Dickebusch are of Belgium, to the southwest of Ypres (Map Coordinates 28.H.19.c).

This accounts for the whereabouts of 2nd Lieutenants Smith, Clarke, Coldicott, and Jamieson. According to the CWGC web site information, these 2nd Lieutenants should be named on the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial, not the Arras Memorial.

 

In November 1917 the battalion was in the area of Bourlon Wood (Map Coordinates 57c.E.12 to 57c.F.14), fighting the German counter attacks, which accounts for 2nd Lieutenants Marchant and Tatum on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval. The CWGC reports that “the CAMBRAI MEMORIAL commemorates more than 7,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom and South Africa who died in the Battle of Cambrai in November and December 1917 and whose graves are not known”. 

We have marked the table of candidates with that information. Second Lieutenant Alick Aylmore was the only unknown candidate that was in the area where the remains were found at any time during the war.

 

What does not make sense to me is that the 2nd Lieutenants lost in May of 1917 are on the Arras Memorial and not the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial. The WWGC site suggests that is where they should be listed:

 

Quote

The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates those of all Commonwealth nations, except New Zealand, who died in the Salient, in the case of United Kingdom casualties before 16 August 1917 (with some exceptions). Those United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war.

 

For the Arras Memorial we have the following, and most certainly Ypres, Belgium is not in the Arras Sector!

 

Quote

The adjacent ARRAS MEMORIAL commemorates almost 35,000 servicemen from the United Kingdom, South Africa and New Zealand who died in the Arras sector between the spring of 1916 and 7 August 1918, the eve of the Advance to Victory, and have no known grave. 

 

I have added that question to Attachment #6, which is in the download version of the report:

 

Quote

ATTACHMENT #6
 

Commonwealth War Graves Commission. Casualty Record: United Kingdom Forces Served in Air Force, October 10-11 1916. http://www.cwgc.org/find-war-dead.aspx?cpage=1

Note:

1.     The list of men taken from the CWGC web site was then restricted to those that were on the memorials for the unknown.
 

2.     The location of the regiment was then determined and the general area and research notes were added.
 

3.     Note that the four (4) Second Lieutenants lost in May 1917 and named on the Arras Memorial, were not in the Arras Sector, rather in operations near
Ypres, Belgium. It is unknown why the men are listed on the Arras Memorial and not the Ypres (Menin Gate) Memorial.


cenbjl9ht5mchwn6g.jpg
 

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thetrenchrat22

Richard,

 

I have just sent details to your normal email address about the 4 named officers This accounts for the whereabouts of 2nd Lieutenants Smith, Clarke, Coldicott, and Jamieson.

 

As there were attached to the other units London Regiments when they died, 2nd/2nd London and 2nd/6th London

 

As I'm unable to attach here,

 

Alan

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laughton

So we follow the bouncing ball - normally the CWGC reports if they were attached to another battalion at the time of their death. Is this now correct?

 

Quote

The casualty records of the CWGC were searched for all 2nd Lieutenants of the 1/15th Civil Service Rifles who were killed in the Great War of 1914-1921 and have no known grave (Attachment #6). The list shows there were ten (10) 2nd Lieutenants, each of which can be tied to a specific battle and location based on the date of their death. In May 1917 when the Arras Offensive was underway in France, the 1/15th Civil Service Rifles were at Swan Chateau, in the Dickebusch are of Belgium, to the southwest of Ypres (Map Coordinates 28.H.19.c). Those men would be named on the Ypres (Menin Gate Memorial).

It is here that the case gets somewhat complicated, for as it turns out, 2nd Lieutenants Smith, Clarke, Coldicott and Jamieson were not serving with the 1/15th (County of London) Battalion (Prince of Wales’s Own Civil Service Rifles)” at that time. They had been attached to the “2/6th (City of London) Battalion (Rifles)”, who were in action near Bihucourt, to the northwest of Bapaume in the Somme Sector (Map Reference 57c.G.17). This accounts for the whereabouts of 2nd Lieutenants Smith, Clarke, Coldicott, and Jamieson. It is unknown why their names are on the Arras Memorial and not the Thiepval Memorial, as they died in the Somme Sector prior to 20 March 1918.


In November 1917 the battalion was in the area of Bourlon Wood (Map Coordinates 57c.E.12 to 57c.F.14), fighting the German counter attacks, which accounts for 2nd Lieutenants Marchant and Tatum on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval. The CWGC reports that “the CAMBRAI MEMORIAL commemorates more than 7,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom and South Africa who died in the Battle of Cambrai in November and December 1917 and whose graves are not known”. 

We have marked the table of candidates with that information. Second Lieutenant Alick Aylmore was the only unknown candidate that was in the area where the remains were found at any time during the war.

 

 

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thetrenchrat22

The CWGC report for Hubert Coldicott shows he was attached to the 2nd/6th Bn. London Regiment (City of London Rifles),  so I looked at adjutant general war diary and found them but no wording of 'attached to' in the Officers report 

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laughton

The report is now in near final format, with the adjustment for all the known locations:

 

http://www.mediafire.com/file/q0pxmq34az136rh/2nd_Lieutenant_Alick_Aylmore_Assevillers_New_British_Cemetery_Plot_9_Row_D_Grave_6.pdf

 

Section 6 was modified to this format:

Quote

1.    The casualty records of the CWGC were searched for all 2nd Lieutenants of the 1/15th Civil Service Rifles who were killed in the Great War of 1914-1921 and have no known grave (Attachment #6). The list shows there were ten (10) 2nd Lieutenants, each of which can be tied to a specific battle and location based on the date of their death. Research into the whereabouts of each of the missing 2nd Lieutenants revealed that only 2nd Lieutenant Aylmore was in the area where the remains were found at any time during the Great War. In summary:
 

a.    In September 1916, 2nd Lieutenant Ware was killed in action near Drop Alley, in the High Wood Area, to the southeast of Le Sars (Map Coordinates 57c.M.29). Although in the Somme Sector of France, this is considerable distance (18,000 yards ~ 10 miles) from where the remains were located. As such, 2nd Lt. Ware is excluded as a candidate for the remains located in Sector 57c.V.6, the area north of Fins.
 

b.    In May 1917 when the Arras Offensive was underway in France, the 1/15th Civil Service Rifles were at Swan Chateau, in the Dickebusch are of Belgium, to the southwest of Ypres (Map Coordinates 28.H.19.c). Those men would be named on the Ypres (Menin Gate Memorial). As the men were named on the Arras Memorial, it immediately appeared that they were not in Belgium at the time of their death. Further checks revealed that 2nd Lieutenants Smith, Clarke, Coldicott, and Jamieson were not serving with the 1/15th (County of London) Battalion (Prince of Wales’s Own Civil Service Rifles)” at that time. They had been attached to the “2/6th (City of London) Battalion (Rifles)”, who were in action near Bihucourt, to the northwest of Bapaume in the Somme Sector (Map Reference 57c.G.17). This accounts for the whereabouts of these four (4) 2nd Lieutenants. t is unknown why their names are on the Arras Memorial and not the Thiepval Memorial, as they died in the Somme Sector prior to 20 March 1918.
 

c.    In November 1917 the battalion was in the area of Bourlon Wood (Map Coordinates 57c.E.12 to 57c.F.14), fighting the German counter attacks, which accounts for 2nd Lieutenants Marchant and Tatum on the Cambrai Memorial, Louverval. The CWGC reports that “the CAMBRAI MEMORIAL commemorates more than 7,000 servicemen of the United Kingdom and South Africa who died in the Battle of Cambrai in November and December 1917 and whose graves are not known”.
 

d.     In August and September 1918, the battalion was considerable distance to the southwest of the area where the remains were found. 2nd Lieutenant Hughes was lost near Mametz (Map Coordinates 62d.K.12). 2nd Lieutenant Garrett, killed a few weeks later than Hughes, was further west in the area near Peronne (Map Coordinates 62.C.3).
 

 

The attachments were also modified:

 

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Edited by laughton

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laughton

Thanks to Alan for his great research on this case! All the war diary attachments have now been added (unless more are found) and the report has been updated.

 

http://www.mediafire.com/file/q0pxmq34az136rh/2nd_Lieutenant_Alick_Aylmore_Assevillers_New_British_Cemetery_Plot_9_Row_D_Grave_6.pdf

 

The new attachments have been inserted for Sections 6 and 8 of the report.

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thetrenchrat22

Richard

 

the other diaries have been sent to your normal email address 

 

alan

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laughton

Thanks Alan!

 

I have added the war diary extracts into Section 6 and the associated attachments. That left only November 1917 without a war diary. In that case I have referenced Chris Bakers web site "The Long, Long, Trail" on the Battle of Cambrai. I doubt that the CWGC will question that information. I have included the reference information that Chris has provided for users of his information and I will make sure he sees this and gives his approval prior to submission.

 

The updated report has been posted:

 

http://www.mediafire.com/file/q0pxmq34az136rh/2nd_Lieutenant_Alick_Aylmore_Assevillers_New_British_Cemetery_Plot_9_Row_D_Grave_6.pdf

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Soleil

I've just been reading this.  Excellent work.

 

I came across it because you mentioned Walter VIctor Mantach Broad.

 

I thought that you might like to know that Walter had been a Chorister at St Paul's Cathedral before the War and that he will be remembered tomorrow at a commemorative service for those Choristers who fell during the Great War.

 

https://www.stpauls.co.uk/greatsilence

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