Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Postcards


trenchtrotter
 Share

Recommended Posts

Cracking picture and on the left is I think maybe a quite rare badge of appointment.  It needs a close up really, but I think it’s a ‘Quarter-Master-Sergeant Wheeler’, marked out by a wheel superimposed on four inverted stripes.  Can someone do a close up to confirm?

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

525251880_T.F.Camp(7).jpg.235937cc932163fdff1ce68b72b6d34b.jpg

Correct. Badged on both sleeves.

Edited by GWF1967
Link to comment
Share on other sites

8 hours ago, GWF1967 said:

525251880_T.F.Camp(7).jpg.235937cc932163fdff1ce68b72b6d34b.jpg

Correct. Badged on both sleeves.

Excellent, yes it is.  Quite a rare badge to see.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 26/04/2021 at 11:06, ilkley remembers said:

@vintagebobtI have messaged the email address to you for Robert Bueschel. He is actually a forum member but do not think that he is a regular visitor. The museum apparently has a significant collection of images and Robert is able to identify some of the locations. 

 

Looking through the photographs that you have posted many photo's in your collection are very similar to mine such as this one which was a play/opera called The Rival Chaviliers(sic). The theatre is reffered to as the Cottbus Empire and it seems that men from all nationalities took part in the performances along with an orchestra. The photographer is Paul Thurman.

1106962052_johnpower14.JPG.7d60d477d0801d08333daa3e4831ff32.JPG1885293993_johnpower12.JPG.34d90f6a19c9f6a5618d7c788126c8cf.JPG

 

John Power was captured in Oct 1914 just a few weeks after he arrived in France and remained at Cottbus until 1918 when he was transferred to an internment camp in Holland and repatriated in November 1918. He had been a pre war regular in the 2nd West Yorks and was from a family who lived on the outskirts of Bradford.

 

The chap in your collection must have been known to John and seemed to have shared an interest in the performing arts

 

Edward

thank you for the updates, I have found and submitted some more photos on here yesterday that may be of interest.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Other then a load of ex service men with lots of medals, I not to sure who they are working for. The cap badge is a crown, could they be prison officers.

IMG_20210926_213501_979.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

15 minutes ago, themonsstar said:

Post 1917 postcard, as there are a few Labour Corps cap badges in the picture. 

IMG_20210926_213739_852.jpg

Green Howard's too?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry Alan, the Labour Corps badge is very distinct, I don't believe there are any soldiers from the Green Howards represented on the postcard.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, themonsstar said:

Sorry Alan, the Labour Corps badge is very distinct, I don't believe there are any soldiers from the Green Howards represented on the postcard.

Ah, yes. I was looking for the LC to be similar to the General Service badge. I see that I confused the LC badge with the Yorkshire Regt.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think the soldiers top left on the picture, my have the General Service Corps badge on, which I believe was worn by the LC for a short time. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, themonsstar said:

A trench seen, the cap badge looks like a Flaming Grenade, so could be a Fusiliers Regt or The Grenadier Guards.

Would the goggles be early anti-gas and the caps indicate pre-steel helmet date ?

The bayonets are also early model.

Edited by charlie962
Link to comment
Share on other sites

That’s an absolutely cracking transitional photo of a Labour Corps unit circa 1918, I think, with some men wearing the old general service badge but the majority in the newly issued badge of piled rifle, pick and shovel.  One chap with a missing eye and another still wearing his erstwhile regimental badge of the Royal Fusiliers.  Some ex wounded were attached to see if they could regain fitness as infantry and did not give up their cap badge and formally transfer until they received the decision of a medical board.

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Henry Frail 21st Bn Manchester Regt & 258212 Labour Corps

 

Henry's number would have put him in the 21st Bn, this does not show on his MIC, but if you look in the Labour Corps medal rolls for his 1915 Star, it has him down for the 21st Bn. His Labour Corps number 258212 was issues between June - September 1917.

Henry landed in France with the 21st Bn, 10th November 1915. And was finished in the Army by 10th March 1919.

Although Henry survive the First World War, he was unfortunate that the Germans got him in the Second World War.

Henry was born 22nd August 1895 and was the son of Hugh & Elizabeth Frail (nee Bentley).

1901 Census the family are living at 23 Mount Street, Charlton on Medlock, Manchester. Henry was 6, his farther Hugh aged 49,  was a Labourer at Fustian Warehouse, his mother was a Cotton Mill, Machine Winder. Henry had five elder siblings.

1911 Census the family are still living at 23 Mount Street, Henry is 15, and working as a Little Piecer in a  Spinning Room. His farther is 57 and a Fustian Raiser. His mother is 53, there are 3 elder siblings at the address.

After the First World War, Henry was living back in Manchester, in 1938 Henry married Florence Binns in Stockport. Florence  resided at 27 Henshaw street, Stretford, this may have been after Henry's death.

1939 National Registration, he is living at Claremont Road, Bristol, Gloucestershire. Henry was working as a Press Tool Setter, Aero Company, Florence was a Ledger Clerk at the Post Office.

At 15:09 hrs on Sunday 29th December 1940, the Rolls Royce factory at Crewe, received a direct hit which killed 13 male & 4 female employees, there were two bombs, one clipped the end of what was known as '16 Shop' and the other fell on the electrical substation just outside, In what is now the Bentley Motors factory, there is a propeller shaped memorial to the 17 employees that died that day.

IMG_20210927_164525_430.jpg

Edited by themonsstar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, themonsstar said:

Henry Frail 21st Bn Manchester Regt & 258212 Labour Corps

 

Henry's number would have put him in the 21st Bn, this does not show on his MIC, but if you look in the Labour Corps medal rolls for his 1915 Star, it has him down for the 21st Bn. His Labour Corps number 258212 was issues between June - September 1917.

Henry landed in France with the 21st Bn, 10th November 1915. And was finished in the Army by 10th March 1919.

Although Henry survive the First World War, he was unfortunate that the Germans got him in the Second World War.

Henry was born 22nd August 1895 and was the son of Hugh & Elizabeth Frail (nee Bentley).

1901 Census the family are living at 23 Mount Street, Charlton on Medlock, Manchester. Henry was 6, his farther Hugh aged 49,  was a Labourer at Fustian Warehouse, his mother was a Cotton Mill, Machine Winder. Henry had five elder siblings.

1911 Census the family are still living at 23 Mount Street, Henry is 15, and working as a Little Piecer in a  Spinning Room. His farther is 57 and a Fustian Raiser. His mother is 53, there are 3 elder siblings at the address.

After the First World War, Henry was living back in Manchester, in 1938 Henry married Florence Binns in Stockport. Florence  resided at 27 Henshaw street, Stretford, this may have been after Henry's death.

1939 National Registration, he is living at Claremont Road, Bristol, Gloucestershire. Henry was working as a Press Tool Setter, Aero Company, Florence was a Ledger Clerk at the Post Office.

At 15:09 hrs on Sunday 29th December 1940, the Rolls Royce factory at Crewe, received a direct hit which killed 13 male & 4 female employees, there were two bombs, one clipped the end of what was known as '16 Shop' and the other fell on the electrical substation just outside, In what is now the Bentley Motors factory, there is a propeller shaped memorial to the 17 employees that died that day.

A poignant story.  It’s interesting that he is wearing khaki drill (KD) uniform.  The 21st Bn Manchester Regiment were a part of 7th Division and in November 1917 the 21st moved with the Division to Italy, remaining there until 13 September 1918, when they returned to France.  The KD suggests that the photo might have been taken in Italy, which implies that he did not transfer over to the Labour Corps until perhaps 1918. I wonder if he was wounded in the March offensive.

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 28/09/2021 at 19:26, themonsstar said:

A member of the Royal Garrison Artillery.

 

superb photo, the cloth RGA, excellent

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 28/09/2021 at 19:43, themonsstar said:

Other then a load of ex service men with lots of medals, I not to sure who they are working for. The cap badge is a crown, could they be prison officers.

Apologies for missing this one, they are indeed prison warders.  The fact that almost all are former soldiers makes me wonder if this was a prison adjacent to a garrison.  The cap badge, type of waistbelt and clasp, and whistle chain are all typical of the prison service pre WW1.  Notice the longer length tunic/coat that is more clearly seen on the men to the right.

BB1438E7-66D0-4423-B3C5-88EFB82E2DBB.jpeg

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 28/09/2021 at 19:26, themonsstar said:

A member of the Royal Garrison Artillery.

Cracking photos, not only RGA, but an Assistant Instructor in Gunnery (AIG) and so member of the RGA Gunnery Staff.  Thank you for posting.

B2DD3AA5-5AFC-4025-915F-C611B0A4251A.jpeg

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, FROGSMILE said:

Cracking photos, not only RGA, but an Assistant Instructor in Gunnery (AIG) and so member of the RGA Gunnery Staff.  Thank you for posting.

B2DD3AA5-5AFC-4025-915F-C611B0A4251A.jpeg

I just viewed his set of badges and intended to post a query re his rank/appointment, then scrolled to the bottom and found my question answered.  
 Many thanks. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thank you for the information on the postcards FS.

RoyAuthor Topic: 19850 P

Edited by themonsstar
Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 hours ago, GWF1967 said:

I just viewed his set of badges and intended to post a query re his rank/appointment, then scrolled to the bottom and found my question answered.  
 Many thanks. 

Glad to help.  It (the badge) changed later in the war.

4 hours ago, themonsstar said:

Thank you for the information on the postcards FS.

RoyAuthor Topic: 19850 P

Always glad to help, thank you for sharing and posting such interesting photographs.

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Welsh regiment territorial battalion bugler/drummer boy

welsh Territorial drummer boy f lightened wm.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Cracking photo of a Boy Drummer.  Thank you for posting it Jerry.  Some TF units retained a connection with the Rifle Volunteer origins by wearing a bugle arm badge rather than a drum, clearly but not in the case of the battalion that this boy belongs to.

Edited by FROGSMILE
Link to comment
Share on other sites

King's Royal Rifle Corps. Overseas service chevrons and wound stripes on show in the front rows; some very young faces towards the back.

King's R.R.C. .jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...