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trenchtrotter
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Band of the 4th Northamptonshire Regiment. T.F.2103782316_4thNorthants.jpg.ebe2aef50edba6285094585e8b3f0c81.jpg      On the back of the card is written  - "Cambridge. Royal Welsh Fusiliers, April 1915.  In band Gordon Bayes"

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19 hours ago, GWF1967 said:

Band of the 4th Northamptonshire Regiment. T.F.2103782316_4thNorthants.jpg.ebe2aef50edba6285094585e8b3f0c81.jpg      On the back of the card is written  - "Cambridge. Royal Welsh Fusiliers, April 1915.  In band Gordon Bayes"

What a great photo, it really evokes the period when bands playing in public drew great attention at a time when few homes had yet acquired wireless sets and people had to make their own entertainment on a banjo, or a piano in the parlour.  It’s difficult to see what the connection was with the Royal Welsh though.  Thank you for posting.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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11 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

 It’s difficult to see what the connection was with the Royal Welsh though.

The LLT lists at least two Battalions of the RWF in Cambridge in April 1915.  The 2/4th left Cambridge on 22 April for Northampton given the units involved coincidence or design?  I agree though it's a terrific image - looks like the spectators were in their 'Sunday Best'

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12 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

 It’s difficult to see what the connection was with the Royal Welsh though.  Thank you for posting.

 

1 hour ago, kenf48 said:

The LLT lists at least two Battalions of the RWF in Cambridge in April 1915.  The 2/4th left Cambridge on 22 April for Northampton given the units involved coincidence or design?  I agree though it's a terrific image - looks like the spectators were in their 'Sunday Best'

Although purchased separately, both cards appeared for sale online at the same time. The building to the left of the Northamptonshire band card appears to match the style of building in this photograph of Royal Welsh Fusiliers in the street. 

 If it is indeed another Cambridge card, they'd be 5th or 7th Battalion, T.F. 

R.W.F. Cambridge.jpg

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1 hour ago, kenf48 said:

The LLT lists at least two Battalions of the RWF in Cambridge in April 1915.  The 2/4th left Cambridge on 22 April for Northampton given the units involved coincidence or design?  I agree though it's a terrific image - looks like the spectators were in their 'Sunday Best'

Thanks Ken, I wondered if it was something like that.

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7 minutes ago, GWF1967 said:

 

Although purchased separately, both cards appeared for sale online at the same time. The building to the left of the Northamptonshire band card appears to match the style of building in this photograph of Royal Welsh Fusiliers in the street. 

 If it is indeed another Cambridge card, they'd be 5th or 7th Battalion, T.F. 

R.W.F. Cambridge.jpg

Thank you GWF1967, it’s fascinating to see them still wearing Slade-Wallace equipment, obsolete for field service by that time, so they must have been a low readiness unit pre-war, as 1903 bandolier equipment seemed to be more common for the TF immediately pre war.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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two welsh regiment officers with some dignitaries?  c.1910 I think and following some research it seems that the white tached officer is probably Colonel A.P James V.D. of 5th TF Bn

 

welsh reg officers in chairs f crop wm.jpg

welsh reg officers in chairs col james comparison.jpg

colonel james 5th tf welsh scan crop.jpg

welsh reg officers in chairs wm.jpg

Edited by Jerry B
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Typical camp style images Jerry, thank you for posting them.  The fellow with the trilby hat can be seen in the gathering of officers photo as the unit Padre, and it’s interesting that Col James only wears collar badges in one of the photos.  I’m not sure if their patrol jackets are the more common blue type, or the final pattern of identically styled scarlet before it was abolished.  If I recall correctly the white cap covers were introduced in the dress regulations of 1911. 

Edited by FROGSMILE
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6 hours ago, FROGSMILE said:

Typical camp style images Jerry, thank you for posting them.  The fellow with the trilby hat can be seen in the gathering of officers photo as the unit Padre, and it’s interesting that Col James only wears collar badges in one of the photos.  I’m not sure if their patrol jackets are the more common blue type, or the final pattern of identically styled scarlet before it was abolished.  If I recall correctly the white cap covers were introduced in the dress regulations of 1911. 

well spotted on the padre mate.

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51 minutes ago, Jerry B said:

well spotted on the padre mate.

Presumably a Welsh Methodist, but that’s just my conjecture.

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The Chaplain seems to have been a bit of a character - an account of a farewell tea and smoking concert in the Fifeshire Advertiser 1 May 1915, noting the departure of the 5th from the town.  Another account says he was from Pontypridd.

Screenshot 2021-09-11 at 20.08.23.png

 

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1 hour ago, kenf48 said:

The Chaplain seems to have been a bit of a character - an account of a farewell tea and smoking concert in the Fifeshire Advertiser 1 May 1915, noting the departure of the 5th from the town.  Another account says he was from Pontypridd.

 

 

Thank you, great to add some history and a second name to this pc

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Due to a large generational gap I had an uncle who served, and survived the First World War, albeit being captured in March 1918 and spending the rest of the war at Stendal camp, Altmark.

He was Private18682  Henry Watson of 11th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, the family has a very comprehensive  history of his service from his volunteering on 12 September 1914 to his eventual repatriation.

The photos attached show 11DLI shortly after arriving at Larkhill Camp, Salisbury Plain on March 26 1915. The formal group photo shows No 15 Platoon, D Company, 11DLI Pioneers, the second working party photo shows my uncle prominently front centre leaning on his shovel in true northern pitman fashion......

IMG_20210912_0001.jpg

IMG_20210912_0004.jpg

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1 hour ago, TDH50 said:

Due to a large generational gap I had an uncle who served, and survived the First World War, albeit being captured in March 1918 and spending the rest of the war at Stendal camp, Altmark.

He was Private18682  Henry Watson of 11th Battalion, Durham Light Infantry, the family has a very comprehensive  history of his service from his volunteering on 12 September 1914 to his eventual repatriation.

The photos attached show 11DLI shortly after arriving at Larkhill Camp, Salisbury Plain on March 26 1915. The formal group photo shows No 15 Platoon, D Company, 11DLI Pioneers, the second working party photo shows my uncle prominently front centre leaning on his shovel in true northern pitman fashion......

IMG_20210912_0001.jpg

IMG_20210912_0004.jpg

The work party photo is a cracker and shows the typical huts that were erected at various camps over Salisbury Plain, including Larkhill and nearby Durrington.  I think that they’re either, digging a drainage ditch between the huts, or perhaps making the necessary hardcore bed for the small gauge railway that was constructed to connect all the camps and ease the transportation of supplies and building materials.  Forum member @Moonrakerwill have a particular interest in your photographs.  Thank you for posting.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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"Button Camp. Potato Picking"

Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Potato planting perhaps.

RWF. Spud Picking (2).jpg

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18 minutes ago, GWF1967 said:

"Button Camp. Potato Picking"

Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Potato planting perhaps.

RWF. Spud Picking (2).jpg

Great photo.  Is it my imagination, or are we seeing a non-white soldier on the left of the image (and a LCpl to boot), holding a box with both hands?  If so, it makes this image even more fascinating.  

Edited by Buffnut453
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26 minutes ago, Buffnut453 said:

Great photo.  Is it my imagination, or are we seeing a non-white soldier on the left of the image (and a LCpl to boot), holding a box with both hands?  If so, it makes this image even more fascinating.  

Yes I agree, and that’s a brilliant spot.  Definitely a black soldier, I wonder what his back story was.  Like you I think the fact that he’s a lance corporal also rather refutes some perceptions of the current historical justice lobby too.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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That is a superb photo GWF, thanks for posting.

 Appears to be their officer standing on the duck boards just behind the soldier with his lefthand leaning on shovel.

The officer appears to have a grenade cap badge, possibly Guards or Fusiliers?

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7 minutes ago, RNCVR said:

That is a superb photo GWF, thanks for posting.

 Appears to be their officer standing on the duck boards just behind the soldier with his lefthand leaning on shovel.

The officer appears to have a grenade cap badge, possibly Guards or Fusiliers?

None but the finest, Royal Welsh Fusiliers, sir!

42 minutes ago, Moonraker said:

Yes I did think of Cardiff too.  Although it was very much a city associated with the Welsh Regiment, whose regimental depot was there, I’m sure that some joined RWF too.

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Every time I see a photo with RWF soldiers, I wonder if my Great-Great Uncle, William Pountney, is in the image.  He joined up on 1 Sep 1914, at age 34 years and 6 months, and was posted to the 9th RWF 4 days later following a medical inspection at Wrexham.  He took a bullet to the chest on the second day of the Somme, was evacuated to Blighty and spent the next 3 weeks recovering before joining the 12th RWF and then 3rd RWF before heading back to France on 25 Oct.  A posting to 2nd RWF was cancelled and he eventually rejoined the 9th RWF on 12 Nov 1916.  He was appointed LCpl on 9 Dec and lost it on 31 Dec for drunkenness (too much New Year spirits?).  On 9 Mar 1917 he joined the 354th Electrical and Mechanical Company, Royal Engineers, and stayed with them thru the end of the War.  As of 15 Apr 1918 he had the following qualifications:

·        Firing and Driving Steam Engines, and Making Repairs to Same:  Very Superior

·        Driving Gas or Oil Engines, and Making Repairs to Same:  Skilled

·        Driving Petrol Internal Combustion Engines Including Procedure in Case of Breakdown:  Skilled

·        Working a Pumping Station:  Skilled

·        Engine Erecting:  Proficient

·        Qualifications in an Iron Trade:  Rough Fitter

·        Working an E.L. Blast Including Repairs to Lining etc:  Proficient

·        General Qualification:  Skilled 

 

Sadly, I never met him and I don't have any photos of him.  One day, I hope to find a pic so I can put a face to this tough old soldier.  

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1 hour ago, Buffnut453 said:

Every time I see a photo with RWF soldiers, I wonder if my Great-Great Uncle, William Pountney, is in the image.  He joined up on 1 Sep 1914, at age 34 years and 6 months, and was posted to the 9th RWF 4 days later following a medical inspection at Wrexham.  He took a bullet to the chest on the second day of the Somme, was evacuated to Blighty and spent the next 3 weeks recovering before joining the 12th RWF and then 3rd RWF before heading back to France on 25 Oct.  A posting to 2nd RWF was cancelled and he eventually rejoined the 9th RWF on 12 Nov 1916.  He was appointed LCpl on 9 Dec and lost it on 31 Dec for drunkenness (too much New Year spirits?).  On 9 Mar 1917 he joined the 354th Electrical and Mechanical Company, Royal Engineers, and stayed with them thru the end of the War.  As of 15 Apr 1918 he had the following qualifications:

·        Firing and Driving Steam Engines, and Making Repairs to Same:  Very Superior

·        Driving Gas or Oil Engines, and Making Repairs to Same:  Skilled

·        Driving Petrol Internal Combustion Engines Including Procedure in Case of Breakdown:  Skilled

·        Working a Pumping Station:  Skilled

·        Engine Erecting:  Proficient

·        Qualifications in an Iron Trade:  Rough Fitter

·        Working an E.L. Blast Including Repairs to Lining etc:  Proficient

·        General Qualification:  Skilled 

 

Sadly, I never met him and I don't have any photos of him.  One day, I hope to find a pic so I can put a face to this tough old soldier.  

That’s a super anecdote Buffnut453 and ostensibly epitomises how the Army had to learn to make better use of the skills already possessed by men when they were enlisted, rather than simply feeding them into the maw of the infantry’s attritional battle.  As an older man when he joined, if I read between the lines of your story, then he perhaps already had some prior experience of electrical and/or mechanical machinery from before the war.  It seems very likely that it saved his life.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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9 minutes ago, FROGSMILE said:

That’s a super anecdote Buffnut453 and ostensibly epitomises how the Army had to learn to make better use of the skills already possessed by men when they were enlisted, rather than simply feeding them into the maw of the infantry’s attritional battle.  As an older man when he joined, if I read between the lines of your story, then he perhaps already had some prior experience of electrical and/or mechanical machinery from before the war.  It seems very likely that it saved his life.

Yes, he was an engine driver in civilian life.  And, agree, it probably saved his life (although the Elec and Mech Coys weren't exactly rear-echelon troops).  He died in 1943, way before I came along.  I can't help wondering if his wound contributed to his demise.  Really wish I could find a photo of him.  It seems his 2 sons didn't have children of their own so I suspect any photos, medals etc were thrown in the bin when my Great-Great Aunt died in 1971.  Alas, nobody from the family kept in touch with her so my quest is probably akin to searching for a living Dodo.  

Edited by Buffnut453
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9 hours ago, Buffnut453 said:

Yes, he was an engine driver in civilian life.  And, agree, it probably saved his life (although the Elec and Mech Coys weren't exactly rear-echelon troops).  He died in 1943, way before I came along.  I can't help wondering if his wound contributed to his demise.  Really wish I could find a photo of him.  It seems his 2 sons didn't have children of their own so I suspect any photos, medals etc were thrown in the bin when my Great-Great Aunt died in 1971.  Alas, nobody from the family kept in touch with her so my quest is probably akin to searching for a living Dodo.  

No I wasn’t suggesting that the RE were a soft option, they were and still are a Combat Service Support corps.  It’s just that the infantry had the highest casualty rates, which surged significantly in 1918, so his odds for survival greatly increased when he left the RWF.

I wish you well with eventually finding an image of your forebear.

Edited by FROGSMILE
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On 12/09/2021 at 18:59, GWF1967 said:

"Button Camp. Potato Picking"

Royal Welsh Fusiliers. Potato planting perhaps.

RWF. Spud Picking (2).jpg

Where was Button Camp, by the way?  I can’t find any reference to it so it’s piqued my curiosity.  

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