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Royal Warwickshire Regiment


robwilliams
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Thank you very much Terry. That's a great help.

Regards,

Matthew

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Rob,

Would any of the Warwicks have been known as the Nanny Goat Lancers? Came up in a conversation yesterday that my Grandad used to call his regiment that. But he was in the Glos too?

Flip

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  • 2 weeks later...

terry, can you please check your data base for the following

14/424 pte bernard jefferies or jeffries r.warwicks

thanks

enoch

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Hi Enoch

I have him down as G Jeffries. Anyway he was an original volunteer to 1st Birmingham Bn (14th RWR) and the address he gave when he volunteered was at Wharfdale St, Wednesbury. He served in B Company, No.6 Platoon and that is all the info I have on him. Does not appear in newspaper casualty lists.

Regards

terry

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thankyou terry, he is supposed to be 2nd from the left!

enoch

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Nice picture Enoch

I have had to save it. Hope you do not mind. It was taken when the battalions moved into the newley erected huts in Sutton Park in April 1915. Any more piccies ??

Terry

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terry, no problem with saving it, the only other picture i have of him is him looking uncomfortable on a horse!

enoch

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terry, where did you get his address on enlistment?

enoch

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  • 4 weeks later...
Guest dannytruell

I am a new member of this great forum, exploring the military history of my family.

I wonder if Rob or others had any information on the three members of my family who served in the Warwicks.

One grandfather, Lieutenant-Colonel Edmund Gray Stuart TRUELL, joined the army in 1896 and served with the Warwicks during the Boer War. We think that he was in the 17th Mounted Infantry Battalion during this period. He was promoted to Captain in 1906 and, when the 3rd Battalion of the Warwicks was disbanded in 1908 in the Haldane Reforms, joined and subsequently commanded 1st Connaught Rangers, serving through WWI.

A great-uncle, Lieutenant-Colonel Gaulter Hugh Rodger Bellingham SOMERVILLE (known as Pat), M.C. served with the Warwicks from 1913 to 1935 and then again from 1940 to 1945 (when he was torpedoed twice running troop ships). As an 'Old Contemptible', he was captured at the Battle of Mons in Autumn 1914, escaped nine times and finally got to freedom in Holland, efforts which earned him a M.C. in 1920.

Another great-uncle, Lieutenant Reginald Malcolm John Bellingham SOMERVILLE (known as Reggie) appears to have joined the regiment in 1915. He subsequently appears to have transferred to the Machine Gun Corps and also survived the War.

Many thanks

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From: The Story Of The Royal Warwickshire Regiment, by C.L. Kingsford

Index: Somerville, Lieut. G. H. R. B. page 136 (attached)

Regards

Richard

post-1376-1119288253.jpg

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Dear Dannytruell

Unfortunately, personal files of the above-mentioned three officers do not exist at the National Archives at Kew.

I would like to add some minor information on Lt.-Col. Somerville & Lt. Somerville as below,

Lt.-Col. Somerville was born on the 01/05/1894. He was commissioned on the 05/02/13 in the Royal Warwickshire Regiment. He became Lt. on 13/05/14, then Capt. on 02/10/15. He served with the 2nd Battn. during the Great War. His M.C. was gazetted on 30/01/20.

Lt. Somerville was commissioned in the 3rd Battn., R.War.R. on the 25/09/15. He was promoted Lt. on the 01/07/17. He served with the 1/6th Battn., R.War.R. from 02/05/17 to 15/04/18. He left 1/6th Battn. to join the M.G.C.

I would recommend to check War Diaries of the 2nd & the 1/6th Battalions of the R.War.R. to collect more information on them.

All the best!

Taryong

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Guest dannytruell

Many thanks for the speedy responses.

One question: if, as seems likely, Lieutenant Pat Somerville was taken prisoner on 21st October 1914, is it not unusual that he was promoted to Captain on 2nd October 1915 when he was a POW ?

Do we know if other Warwick POWs were awarded the M.C. in January 1920 for their efforts to escape from captivity ?

Am I right in assuming that I can find Unit War Diaries in the IWM ?

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Dear Dannytruell

This is my answer to your question about promotion of officers while being Prisoner of War.

1. Article 47 of the Pay Warrant reads as follows : -

“The promotion of a Lieutenant taken a prisoner of war may take place in the same manner, as if he were effective with his regiment. In the case of a Captain who, if he had not been made a prisoner, would have been promoted to the rank of Major, the loss of promotion consequent on capture by the enemy, may subsequently in like manner be made good to him after his exchange or release, so far as may be practicable, by his being advanced to the substantive rank for which he would have been selected, had he not been taken prisoner, and by the antedating of his promotion.”

2. A conclusion of the 232nd Meeting of the Army Council held on the 11/10/17 was,

"The Council decided that an officer taken prisoner as a 2nd Lieutenant may be promoted to the rank of Lieutenant, and the loss of further promotion up the rank of Captain, consequent on capture, may be made good to him after his exchange or release, so far as may be practicable, and that any consequent antedate should carry pay.

Similarly, an officer taken prisoner as a Lieutenant may be promoted to the rank of Captain, and the loss of further promotion up to the rank of Major may be made good to him after his exchange or release, so far as may be practicable, and that any consequent antedate should carry pay."

Regards

Taryong

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Dear Dannytruell

I would recommend the National Archives at Kew than the IWM for War Diaries.

If you live in Midlands, the best way to read War Diaries of the Warwicks should be to visit the R. War. R. Museum at Warwick. Fortunately, they have War Diaries of all battalions of the R. War. R. during the Great War, though they are not original ones. Staffs of the Museum are very helpful to visitors and researchers.

All the best!

Taryong

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  • 2 weeks later...
Guest geoff501
Hope I can be of help to someone.  Over the years I have built up a database of

Rob,

Do you have anything on Sgt. George Kings 11837 Royal Warks. ?

I think he transferred to the Wiltshires.

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Guest Boer-War
Hope I can be of help to someone.  Over the years I have built up a database of members of the above Regiment.  It currently has 39000 entries.  By necessity, it is still not complete.  However, if you want me to look someone up, just ask

Hi Rob,

Will you please check your database to see if my Grandfather, Richard Tyler, Regimental No, 2995 is there. He was a Regular before the Great War and was called up as a Reservist landing in France/Belgium on the 5th October 1914. However he transferred to the Suffolk Regmt soon after and his Regmt No was given to Frank Steeley who landed in france on 22nd March 1915. My grandfather went on to win the MM and two Bars with the Suffolks which were Gazetted in 1919.

Grateful for any information you may have.

Eric Tyler

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Dear Martyn

I am not Rob, but have got some information on 2nd Lt. Weinel.

2nd Lt. George Henry Weinel was born on 24/12/1884 in Marylebone, London and died on 28/10/18.

His height was 6 ft 2 ins. His nationality by birth of father was German. His father naturalised in 1870.

He origibally enlisted to the Esat Kent Yeomanry on 30/04/08 and, then, was transferred to the 10th Buffs. on 16/12/16. He was commissioned in the 1/8th Bn., Royal Warwickishire Regiment on 26/09/17.

I have got some more information on him. Could you let me know why you take interest in him?

All the best,

Taryong

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Thank you for such a very quick response.

My interest in him is that my mother was a Weinel. There was only one family of them in the UK, and only a few hundred in Germany, so the name is very rare.

I would be very interested in anything else you have on him.

Martyn

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Dear Martyn

2nd Lt. Weinel was the only brother of Luna & Gertrude Weinel, of 63 Brailesford Road, Tulse Hill, London.

Is your mother one of these ladies?

2nd Lt. Weinel was educated at the Hampden School, Surrey. His occupation in civil life was Diamong Valuer and Engineer. His father was a Restaurant Proprietor & Caterer.

Prior to his enlistment to the East Kent Yeo. on 30/04/08, Mr. Weinel had served in the Imperial Yeomanry (Volunteer Force) from 02/09/06 to 29/04/08.

His personal file is at the National Archives at Kew. I would recommend you to visit there to see the file. The file number is WO 374/72908. Also, you can find a comment on him on the Birmingham Daily Post, dated on 27/11/18.

All the best!

Taryong

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Andrew, Regarding Frederick Howlett Pittaway the following information on him is contained in my book:

PITTAWAY, FREDERICK HOWLETT 30061 Private, 2nd Battalion Royal Warwickshire Regiment. 22nd Brigade, 7th Division. Killed in action near Ginchy during the Battle of Guillemont on Sunday 3 September 1916. Age 27. The son of William and Susan Pittaway, of St. Johns Terrace, Kenilworth. He was born and enlisted in Kenilworth. Before the war he was a farmer and haulier of Windy Arbour, Kenilworth. He served overseas at sometime after Saturday 1 January 1916. Commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, Somme, France. He is also commemorated on the Saint Nicholas Church War Memorial, Kenilworth and the St. John the Evangelist Church Memorial, Kenilworth.

British War Medal, Victory Medal.

Hope this helps.

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Taryong

Thank you for that fascinating information. I assume there is a typo, did you mean diamond valuer? Interesting that his father's profession is given as Restaurant Proprietor & Caterer, it was my understanding he was a baker, but obviously expanded his skills. George's father was my great, great uncle.

I will follow up the comment in the Birmingham Daily Post, a visit to Kew was already being planned.

Thanks again

Martyn

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Dear Martyn

Sorry for my mistake in typing! Yes, 2nd Lt. Weinel was a diamond valuer in civil life.

All information I have given to you is based on his personal file at the National Archives at Kew.

All the best,

Taryong

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