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Who is This ? ? ?

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Uncle George
1 hour ago, neverforget said:

Continuing the sporting theme, another international. 

Wounded on the Somme, but survived the war and was able to resume his playing career afterwards.

 

 

Is he Fred Bullock, Huddersfield Town and England?

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neverforget

1 minute ago, Uncle George said:

 

Is he Fred Bullock, Huddersfield Town and England?

He isn't but you're on the correct shaped ball.

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Uncle George

Tommy Boyle, Burnley and England?

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neverforget
7 minutes ago, Uncle George said:

Tommy Boyle, Burnley and England?

No. Before and after the war he played for for Reading

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Uncle George
30 minutes ago, neverforget said:

No. Before and after the war he played for for Reading

 

Ted Hanney?

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neverforget
26 minutes ago, Uncle George said:

 

Ted Hanney?

The very same. Well played. 

https://www.footballandthefirstworldwar.org/ted-hanney/

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Uncle George

Sprinting away from sport now. This man described Kitchener as, “an outstanding personality of great value in spite of certain defects.”

 

Who is he ? ? ?

75AE63FD-12A7-4F9E-89A0-C7ED26F158BF.jpeg

 

EDIT: Image from here: https://artuk.org/discover/artworks/charles-hardinge-1st-baron-hardinge-of-penshurst-157419

Edited by Uncle George

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Uncle George

He was rather opinionated, this chap. Here he is on Ll.G at the Peace Conference:

 

”Lloyd George was quite the most dangerous representative it was possible to have. Still, unfitted as he was for the position he held in Paris, he always had a singular charm and was, when he chose, a most delightful and amusing companion.”

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Uncle George

Nor did he have much time for Curzon:

 

”I have often discussed Curzon with our mutual friends and I have always maintained that in him there were embodied two entirely different personalities which showed themselves according to surrounding circumstances. The one was a delightful, amusing, clever and most charming companion, while the other was a hard and relentless man, and the more one saw this side of him the more one almost hated him.”

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neverforget

Is it Edward House?

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Uncle George
34 minutes ago, neverforget said:

Is it Edward House?

 

It is not. Let us look at Ll.G’s ‘War Memoirs’, and this chap’s index references:

 

Commander Wedgwood emphasises blunders of, 483;

 

rejects offer of help in Mesopotamia, 491;

 

deceives Home Government about troops available in India, 492;

 

severely censured, 492-3.

 

Edited by Uncle George

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neverforget

I have his War Memoirs, so I won't look but will pursue alternative lines of enquiry. 

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Uncle George

Here he is on the “change of personnel in the Government, Lloyd George becoming Prime Minister”:

 

 

D9E1F47C-6740-4DBD-8C95-CE0663480C05.jpeg

 

wonderful charm.

Edited by Uncle George

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Michelle Young

Arthur Bigge? 

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Uncle George
19 minutes ago, Michelle Young said:

Arthur Bigge? 

 

Not him, no. Here’s my chap again, once more on Ll.G at Paris:

 

 

27F32795-C9DB-435F-9F6E-D4DDB0479AF2.jpeg

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seaJane

Is it Lord Milner?

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Uncle George
27 minutes ago, seaJane said:

Is it Lord Milner?

 

No. Before the War he chaired a sub-Committee of the Committee of Imperial Defence, which sub-Committee dealt with foreign espionage. He reveals:

 

 

 

 

7837B263-39D3-410A-962E-EAF3CEFF18F2.jpeg

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michaeldr

Charles Hardinge (your Indian clue was v helpful)

The portrait which you chose makes him look somewhat surprised and the (enjoyable) quotes you give suggest

someone who has just commented harshly on a well known contemporary and is waiting for a reaction

 

 

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Uncle George
35 minutes ago, michaeldr said:

Charles Hardinge (your Indian clue was v helpful)

The portrait which you chose makes him look somewhat surprised and the (enjoyable) quotes you give suggest

someone who has just commented harshly on a well known contemporary and is waiting for a reaction

 

 

 

Yes indeed, A remarkable career, including Viceroy, Ambassador to Russia and to France, and (twice) Permanent Secretary at the Foreign Office. Quotes are from his autobiography, ‘Old Diplomacy’ (1947):

 

https://archive.org/details/in.ernet.dli.2015.216312

 

He writes of “constant raids on London of squadrons of German aeroplanes and Zeppelin airships”:

 

2E208896-40E4-4EFD-AFBB-F9FBF8065F60.jpeg

54941953-D164-4216-AEFA-9CE99302709E.jpeg

Edited by Uncle George

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neverforget

Who is this brave gentleman who's gallantry was not officially recognised in his lifetime???

20190319_194606.png.c1d86c0dc694daf566875d8074312fc2.png

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Uncle George

Is he Canadian?

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neverforget
1 minute ago, Uncle George said:

Is he Canadian?

Indeed so. 

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Marilyne

Going to pass on that one...

good luck everyone!!

 

M.

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neverforget
21 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

Going to pass on that one...

good luck everyone!!

 

M.

He performed an act of valour at Vimy, and was recommended for a gallantry award, which because of the prejudices of the time, didn't see the light of day. However, after pressure from his peers and others for amost a hundred years, his courage was eventually recognised.

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Uncle George

Is he Seymour Tyler?

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