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Remembered Today:

WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards


Lancashire Fusilier

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Lancashire Fusilier

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Exactly 4 years ago today - December 17, 2011, at around this time, I started this Thread, and now 173 pages and 97,730 views later.

Fantastic images and informative text: Thanks LF. Hopefully 173 more.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Fantastic images and informative text: Thanks LF. Hopefully 173 more.

Many thanks, and yes, plenty more to come.

Regards,

LF

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From a set of cigarette cards as I recall?! Well done LF; thoroughly enjoyed checking-out this thread, every day for the past four years!!

David

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Lancashire Fusilier

From a set of cigarette cards as I recall?! Well done LF; thoroughly enjoyed checking-out this thread, every day for the past four years!!

David

David,

Correct, and your very first post to this Thread was the very next day, December 18, 2011.

Your continuing interest in this Thread, is much appreciated.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

For London's Victory Parade held on 19th July, 1919, a large ornate ' Saluting Base ' was erected in front of the Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace, from which King George V took the salute.

This first photograph, shows the location of the Saluting Base, seen on the right, in front of the Victoria Memorial as the Victory Parade passes.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

King George V watches London's 1919 Victory Parade pass, and takes the salute from the Saluting Base erected in front of the Victoria Memorial outside Buckingham Palace.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

An excellent photograph, showing the Tank Corps' Medium Mark C Hornet Tanks taking part in London's July 19th, 1919 Victory Parade, passing King George V's Saluting Base outside Buckingham Palace.

LF

IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

Excellent, I purchased a copy of the MLRS CD on WW1 tanks some time ago, it gives a mass of detail drawings of most of the tanks used in WW1. Great for model makers, still looking for info on traction engines though.....looked at the earlier posts you suggested, some great photos, thanks.

George.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Excellent, I purchased a copy of the MLRS CD on WW1 tanks some time ago, it gives a mass of detail drawings of most of the tanks used in WW1. Great for model makers, still looking for info on traction engines though.....looked at the earlier posts you suggested, some great photos, thanks.

George.

George,

I think you will enjoy the upcoming ' Aveling & Porter ' posts, I have also sent you a PM.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier
Aveling & Porter - WW1 Traction Engines and Steam Rollers
Thomas Aveling ( 1824-1882 ) founded his ' Aveling ' Engineering Company in 1858 in Rochester, Kent, later acquiring a workshop and foundry by the River Stroud, where in 1861 Aveling started producing his own ' Aveling ' Steam Engines at what was now his ' Invicta ' works.
In 1862, Thomas Aveling wishing to expand his Steam Engine business and obtain additional Capital, went into partnership with Richard Porter to form ' Aveling & Porter '.
With continuing success and expansion, Aveling & Porter became Britian's largest manufacturer of Steam Engines, and Steam Rollers, with their first Steam Roller, a 30 ton machine, being produced in 1867.
Thomas Aveling died in 1882, and was succeeded by his son Thomas Lake Aveling, who in turn was succeeded by his son, Major Thomas Aveling, who during WW1 was awarded the Military Cross.
As early as 1868, Aveling & Porter had received British Government military contracts to supply Steam Engines and Steam Rollers to the Army, including the massive ' Sapper ' Steam Engines made specifically for the Royal Engineers ( hence the ' Sapper ' engine's naming ).
The Royal Engineer's ' Sapper ' Steam Engines were used to haul the massive loads used by the R.E. in bridge construction and road construction etc.
In 1885, the Aveling & Porter ' Sapper ' Steam Engine was also used by the newly formed Balloon Corps to haul their massive ' Balloon Trains ', which consisted of 5 heavy wagons carrying the gas cylinders used to inflate the Observation Balloon, and other wagons carrying the balloon, the balloon basket and the balloon winch, as well as the balloon's crew and other supplies.
Aveling & Porter's Army contracts continued into WW1, with Aveling & Porter supplying the War Department with Steam Engines, Wagons and Steam Rollers.
Interestingly, in 1912, Aveling & Porter also produced a petrol engine commercial lorry.
No doubt due to their Kent connections, Aveling & Porter's easily recognisable logo typically seen on the front of their engines, included the ' White Horse ' and ' Invicta ' designs seen on Kent's Coat of Arms.
The first photograph, shows the massive ' Sapper ' Steam Engine produced by Aveling & Porter for the Royal Engineers.
LF
IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Aveling & Porter - WW1 Traction Engines and Steam Rollers
Thomas Aveling ( 1824-1882 ) founded his ' Aveling ' Engineering Company in 1858 in Rochester, Kent, later acquiring a workshop and foundry by the River Stroud, where in 1861 Aveling started producing his own ' Aveling ' Steam Engines at what was now his ' Invicta ' works.
In 1862, Thomas Aveling wishing to expand his Steam Engine business and obtain additional Capital, went into partnership with Richard Porter to form ' Aveling & Porter '.
With continuing success and expansion, Aveling & Porter became Britian's largest manufacturer of Steam Engines, and Steam Rollers, with their first Steam Roller, a 30 ton machine, being produced in 1867.
Thomas Aveling died in 1882, and was succeeded by his son Thomas Lake Aveling, who in turn was succeeded by his son, Major Thomas Aveling, who during WW1 was awarded the Military Cross.
As early as 1868, Aveling & Porter had received British Government military contracts to supply Steam Engines and Steam Rollers to the Army, including the massive ' Sapper ' Steam Engines made specifically for the Royal Engineers ( hence the ' Sapper ' engine's naming ).
The Royal Engineer's ' Sapper ' Steam Engines were used to haul the massive loads used by the R.E. in bridge construction and road construction etc.
In 1885, the Aveling & Porter ' Sapper ' Steam Engine was also used by the newly formed Balloon Corps to haul their massive ' Balloon Trains ', which consisted of 5 heavy wagons carrying the gas cylinders used to inflate the Observation Balloon, and other wagons carrying the balloon, the balloon basket and the balloon winch, as well as the balloon's crew and other supplies.
Aveling & Porter's Army contracts continued into WW1, with Aveling & Porter supplying the War Department with Steam Engines, Wagons and Steam Rollers.
Interestingly, in 1912, Aveling & Porter also produced a petrol engine commercial lorry.
No doubt due to their Kent connections, Aveling & Porter's easily recognisable logo typically seen on the front of their engines, included the ' White Horse ' and ' Invicta ' designs seen on Kent's Coat of Arms.
The first photograph, shows the massive ' Sapper ' Steam Engine produced by Aveling & Porter for the Royal Engineers.
LF
I'll be looking forward to this thread continuing.
My Hotmail account seems to be playing up, nothing received yet.
George.
IWM This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

I

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Lancashire Fusilier

Another of the Aveling & Porter large Steam Engines, the massive 36 hp model.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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That's a ploughing engine. The wide wheels would allow it to be driven onto the edges of fields without sinking too much. As this has only one winch-drum, a second engine would be driven onto the other side of the field and a plough hauled between the two. I once saw a pair working at a steam gathering in Oxfordshire and that plough had two sets of ploughshares so that it could be reversed without having to be realigned. It could be steered by a man seated on the top to keep the furrows straight. I've seen that ploughing engines not only speeded up ploughing but allowed fields to be ploughed that were too boggy for conventional ploughing, so long as the edges of the fields could be made to support the engines' weight.

Keith

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Lancashire Fusilier

That's a ploughing engine.

Keith,

Many thanks for that interesting explanation, I was wondering what was the purpose of the machinery underneath the engine ?

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

An early Aveling & Porter Steam Engine trade advertisement, published in January 1866.



LF





Grace's Guide This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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Many thanks for that interesting explanation, I was wondering what was the purpose of the machinery underneath the engine ?

There are some photos of ploughing engines at work on this page.

Keith

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Ruston and Hornsby[edit]

It had a dramatic formation, and was established by people not new to its field of engineering. It was formed in February 1934[1] when Aveling and Porter of Rochester, Kenteffectively went bankrupt, when the parent company Agricultural & General Engineers (AGE) went into receivership in 1932. At the same time Barford & Perkins (related to today's Perkins Engines) of Peterborough were also entering administration. Frank Perkins worked for his family company of Barford & Perkins, and also Aveling and Porter. These two companies were Britain's two leading manufacturers of road rollers.

Some well known companies, Perkins, Ruston and Hornsby [now or was, Ruston Bucyrus?] All construction industry equipment.

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Lancashire Fusilier

No doubt celebrating their Kentish heritage, Aveling & Porter's logo, which was proudly displayed on the front of their machines, consisted of the ' White Horse of Kent ' with the ' Invicta ' banner.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Reads 'Noyes Bros', an Australian company, described as 'an importer of engineering products', so probably an agent for Aveling and Porter.

Mike.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Reads 'Noyes Bros', an Australian company, described as 'an importer of engineering products', so probably an agent for Aveling and Porter.

Mike.

Mike,

Thanks for the information, Aveling & Porter exported their Steam Engines worldwide, particularly to the countries in the British Empire, and as you say, Noyes Bros., were overseas importers/agents for Aveling & Porter.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

There are some photos of ploughing engines at work on this page.

Keith,

A superb selection of Steam Engines, particularly the Ploughing Engines, thanks for the link.

Regards,

LF

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