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Stoppage Drill

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voltaire60
29 minutes ago, Margaretnolan said:

I Can’t make the connection to Paul Bethany Voltaire.

 

      Well, this is GWF- so the proposition runs thus:

 

   Paul Bettany's only effective connection with the Great War is that he played Lieutenant Osborne (as a Captain) in the recent film version of "Journeys End".  An excellent film- very well-staged as far as the kit and the trenches are concerned-and very, very well acted by the cast. The edginess, tension and sheer exhaustion of the trenches comes across very well indeed. It was a pleasant  surprise to find that the -for  all the trenches props- was still faithful to the play led me to look up  who acted in the original stage version of 1929.  The lead character-Stanhope- was played by the young Larry Olivier.   George Zucco played Osborne.  Although seen mainly as a character actor in  some distinctly bad horror movies, he took the part in the stage play, which ran for 2 years in London.   And-indeed-he was a veteran himself.-served in the West Yorkshire Regiment

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Ron Clifton

Re post 10250: "Our fire-eating Adjutant-General", Nevil Macready?

 

Ron

Edited by Ron Clifton

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voltaire60
13 minutes ago, Ron Clifton said:

Re post 10250: "Our fire-eating Adjutant-General", Nevil Macready?

 

Ron

 

      Alas, No-  Yes, the pics.  show that Macready held the QSA with 5 bars-and he was MID in South Africa  Well done on that- but in 1901 Macready was based in Joahnnesburg on staff work -so the clue about QVs funeral is not there.  I think there is only one possible candidate left- a man of great personal integrity. One final small clue-our man lost a son in Italy in 1943.

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voltaire60
10 hours ago, Knotty said:

George Zucco played a Nazi spy when he starred  in “Sherlock Holmes in Washington” with Basil R., and post# 10241 I believe is a painting of Queen Victoria’s Funeral cortège. That’s my starting contribution........

 

I need to find out who Paul Bettany is before I can comment

ps I will label myself one of the assorted misfits.

 

 

     I think it is "Assorted Misfit".  As with "Old Contemptible", it is a title of honour:wub:

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Ron Clifton
19 minutes ago, voltaire60 said:

 

      Alas, No-  Yes, the pics.  show that Macready held the QSA with 5 bars-and he was MID in South Africa  Well done on that- but in 1901 Macready was based in Joahnnesburg on staff work -so the clue about QVs funeral is not there.  I think there is only one possible candidate left- a man of great personal integrity. One final small clue-our man lost a son in Italy in 1943.

Having pursued the red herring of Byng (who also had five clasps to the QSA Medal, but had no children) I eventually ended up with Sir Philip Game, who commanded part of the escort at the Queen's funeral, and did indeed lose his younger son in Italy in 1943.

 

Ron

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voltaire60
Just now, Ron Clifton said:

Having pursued the red herring of Byng (who also had five clasps to the QSA Medal, but had no children) I eventually ended up with Sir Philip Game, who commanded part of the escort at the Queen's funeral, and did indeed lose his younger son in Italy in 1943.

 

Ron

 

     Full marks for doggedness,Ron.  I think Game a much under-rated figure, considered too often to be just the bag-man and camp follower for "Boom". But his military career before the RFC/RAF came along was every bit as distinguished as Trenchard and he had the makings of a higher echelon General's career in him. We tend to forget that many of the successful RFC/RAF commanders were  career army officers-and had already pulled ahead on that before they transferred= Dowding, Trenchard, Game- all "coming men" as army officers. But nowadays their army careers are a mere footnote.

    I like Game because he comes across as a very fair man.  There is the story that he was so modest (not to be confused with "unassuming")  that he continued to travel by bus to work even when Commissioner. Having been not long back to a public meeting with a presentation by a later Commissioner, then it was a surprise by just how many staff officers and flunkeys accompanied him (More than the average Met. division has out on the streets during a night shift). 

 

      Ron- Full marks for endurance on this one- You are permitted to go off duty and have a tincture of  something worthwhile

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Margaretnolan
2 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

 

      Well, this is GWF- so the proposition runs thus:

 

   Paul Bettany's only effective connection with the Great War is that he played Lieutenant Osborne (as a Captain) in the recent film version of "Journeys End".  An excellent film- very well-staged as far as the kit and the trenches are concerned-and very, very well acted by the cast. The edginess, tension and sheer exhaustion of the trenches comes across very well indeed. It was a pleasant  surprise to find that the -for  all the trenches props- was still faithful to the play led me to look up  who acted in the original stage version of 1929.  The lead character-Stanhope- was played by the young Larry Olivier.   George Zucco played Osborne.  Although seen mainly as a character actor in  some distinctly bad horror movies, he took the part in the stage play, which ran for 2 years in London.   And-indeed-he was a veteran himself.-served in the West Yorkshire Regiment

 

Darn it! I should have thought of that. I see he was a veteran himself. I thought the link to Paul Bethany could be a family link and searched for the link for ages to his parents etc.

I have seen the recent film and read the play. The film is excellent, very well acted, you could hear a pin drop in the cinema, the only cinema which it was shown I think, down south, here in Ireland. 

My 17 year old son said it was the best film he had seen and he is some critique. 

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Ron Clifton
15 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

We tend to forget that many of the successful RFC/RAF commanders were  career army officers

When researching the Battle of Amiens I came across the fact that three of the RAF Squadron commanders supporting the attack on 8 August, all majors, went on to achieve high rank in WW2.

 

Question: who were they? (No pictures offered - that would be too easy!)

 

Ron

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voltaire60

Arthur  Tedder?  Keith Park?  Arthur Harris?  

 

(If not,then interesting to note another phenomenon-  all 3 of them "Empire" men at the beginning of the war. Park,of course, a New Zealander. Harris had migrated to Rhodesia and served first with the 1st Rhodesia Regiment. And Tedder was a Colonial Officer in Fiji before coming back to a commission in the Dorsets.)

Edited by voltaire60

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Ron Clifton

One out of three correct (Park).

 

Ron

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Stoppage Drill

"Mary" Coningham must have been another ?

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voltaire60
1 minute ago, Stoppage Drill said:

"Mary" Coningham must have been another ?

 

     B*gger the answer.   Good to see you   :wub:

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Stoppage Drill

The origin of Coningham's nickname (Mary) is obscure.

 

Anybody know ?

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IPT

It is a corruption of his original nickname, 'Maori'.

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voltaire60
6 minutes ago, Stoppage Drill said:

The origin of Coningham's nickname (Mary) is obscure.

 

Anybody know ?

  This from Oxford DNB, with Thanks

 

During April, however, Coningham sailed for England at his own expense and in August was admitted to the Royal Flying Corps, commissioned as a second lieutenant, and taught to fly. He graduated from the Central Flying School (CFS) at Upavon on 25 November 1916 and joined 32 squadron on the western front in December. He now became known as Mary, a nickname worn down from the original Maori (then thought suitable for any New Zealander) and made sure his friends used it; except officially, he never again answered to Arthur.

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michaeldr
2 minutes ago, voltaire60 said:

he never again answered to Arthur

 

Henderson (Monty's ADC) referred  to him as The Snake in the Grass due to lack of cooperation around/over Caen in July '44

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Knotty
It was during his service with 32 Squadron that Coningham found himself 
a new name. Leonard Rochford (a famous pilot in No. 3 (Naval) Squadron) 
recalled that Coningham was always known as 'Mary', a nickname worn 
down from the original 'Maori', given him because he was from New 
Zealand, but Rochford once heard Coningham tell someone that he was 
called Mary because his mother had wanted a girl. However, Christopher 
Musgrave, a New Zealand friend, later claimed that the name was given 
while Coningham was convalescing in a Cairo hospital in 1915. He was 
discovered by a fellow-patient sharing cocoa and kisses with a nurse, Mary Steele of Auckland, in an office at the end of the ward. On returning to his bed, he was met with a chorus of 'Connie loves Mary' and somehow he became 'Mary'. Whatever the truth may be, the fact remains that for reasons best known to himself he wanted to be called Mary and made sure that his friends knew this; except for official purposes, he never again answered to 'Arthur'.

Taken from https://archive.org/details/Coningham, a copy of his biography.

Sorry a bit late coming to this one

Edited by Knotty

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Heid the Ba
3 hours ago, Ron Clifton said:

When researching the Battle of Amiens I came across the fact that three of the RAF Squadron commanders supporting the attack on 8 August, all majors, went on to achieve high rank in WW2.

Question: who were they? (No pictures offered - that would be too easy!)

Ron

Leigh-Mallory?

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Ron Clifton

Yes. Only one more to go!

 

Ron

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seaJane
On 21/06/2018 at 18:51, voltaire60 said:

George Zucco played Osborne

I thought that connection had to be it, but couldn't find a cast list! 

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voltaire60
2 minutes ago, seaJane said:

I thought that connection had to be it, but couldn't find a cast list! 

 

      Mr.W.I.Kiepdeidia has the cast list. He seems quite useful, though it was surprise to find that Field Marshal Earl Haig  converted to Tibetan Buddhism and became the Dalai Lama. That was new to me:wub:

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seaJane

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voltaire60
Just now, seaJane said:

:D

 

  

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seaJane

Robert Speaight played Jesus in Dorothy L. Sayers' The Man Born to be King...

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Ron Clifton

And, of course, Richard Caldicot played Commander/Captain Povey in The Navy Lark.

 

For clarity, Coningham was not one of my three RAF majors at Amiens. We have Park and Leigh-Mallory but there is still one to go.

 

Ron

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