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voltaire60

And this chap........

 

       Image result for gordon harker

 

 

       You want clues  as well?  Spoilt children.  

               

           Badly wounded 1917 serving with a Service, New Armies battalion of a  county regiment.     He played a significant, if tangential role, in the evacuation from Dunkirk in the next Friday Night Punch-Up.  And was especially selected by Asquith for an important morale-boosting war job.

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Uncle George
10 hours ago, Knotty said:

 

It is Prince Leopold later King Leopold III of Belgium, born in 1901 he was 13 at the outbreak of war, allegedly with the 12th Regiment of the Line but at 14 he was sent to Eton for his education in preparation for when he became King.

 

http://madmonarchist.blogspot.co.uk/2012/03/monarch-profile-king-leopold-iii-of.html

 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Leopold_III_of_Belgium

 

Yes indeed; and you have posted the source of the photograph.

 

He was unfairly taken apart following the defeats of 1940, by Ll.G:

 

 "You can rummage in vain through the black annals of the most reprobate Kings of the earth to find a blacker and more squalid sample of perfidy and poltroonery than that perpetuated by the King of the Belgians.”

 

and by WSC:

 

“At the last moment, when Belgium was already invaded, King Leopold called upon us to come to his aid, and even at the last moment we came. He and his brave, efficient Army, nearly half a million strong, guarded our left flank and thus kept open our only line of retreat to the sea. Suddenly, without prior consultation, with the least possible notice, without the advice of his Ministers and upon his own personal act, he sent a plenipotentiary to the German Command, surrendered his Army, and exposed our whole flank and means of retreat."

 

Alone among the crowned heads of Europe, he was not invited to Elizabeth's wedding in 1947.

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Uncle George
6 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

And this chap........

 

       Image result for gordon harker

 

 

       You want clues  as well?  Spoilt children.  

               

           Badly wounded 1917 serving with a Service, New Armies battalion of a  county regiment.     He played a significant, if tangential role, in the evacuation from Dunkirk in the next Friday Night Punch-Up.  And was especially selected by Asquith for an important morale-boosting war job.

 

Blimey! It's Alfred Marks! (Seen here on IMDb):

 

 

image.jpg

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voltaire60
21 minutes ago, Uncle George said:

Blimey! It's Alfred Marks! (Seen here on IMDb):

 

     Alas, No   - UG- You have been watching the dog episode from "The Sweeney" again on JunkoTV haven't you?   That Alfred Marks was born after the Great War may,possibly, just-on a technicality-rule him out.

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Ron Clifton
9 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

What links the following Underground stations- Gants Hill, Arnos Grove and Golders Green- but excludes Earl's Court.  A list of all Undergorund stations can keep a pure pedant busy for days.

Is it correct that there is only one London Underground station whose name uses only one vowel, but more than once? (I thought of Bank as I was typing this, hence the further qualification.) There is a seasonal reference here.

 

Ron

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Uncle George
18 minutes ago, voltaire60 said:

 

  That Alfred Marks was born after the Great War may,possibly, just-on a technicality-rule him out.

 

One must guard against a pedantic over-concern for accuracy. Remember WSC's advice to Ismay: "You should forget these outmoded Staff College shibboleths!"

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voltaire60
14 minutes ago, Uncle George said:

One must guard against a pedantic over-concern for accuracy

 

     And as well as "The Sweeney", you've been watching the truth v myth debate  with James Stewart in "The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance"

 

Our man was born in Wandsworth- though the county regiment he served with does not border Wandsworth at all (ie not any of the London Regiment, Royal Fusiliers, West Surrey or Middlesex) . And he really was in Acacia Avenue!!

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voltaire60
17 minutes ago, Ron Clifton said:

Is it correct that there is only one London Underground station whose name uses only one vowel, but more than once? (I thought of Bank as I was typing this, hence the further qualification.) There is a seasonal reference here.

 

Ron

 

   Alas, Ron-I have forgotten what the answer is to that one- There is one Tube station that uses all vowels once only.....

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Knotty
15 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

He played a significant, if tangential role, in the evacuation from Dunkirk in the next Friday Night Punch-Up. 

 

Would that be the 1940 Channel Incident by junior Asquith?

If so I think I have identified him at last!

 

Edited by Knotty

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Nepper
13 hours ago, voltaire60 said:
13 hours ago, Ron Clifton said:

Is it correct that there is only one London Underground station whose name uses only one vowel, but more than once? (I thought of Bank as I was typing this, hence the further qualification.) There is a seasonal reference here.

 

Ron

 

   Alas, Ron-I have forgotten what the answer is to that one- There is one Tube station that uses all vowels once only.....

The following only have one vowel but multiple uses of same:- Archway, Balham, Canary Wharf, Chalk Farm, Debden, Holborn, Northolt, Northwood, St. John's Wood, Stepney Green, Temple, Woodford.

 

The only station name using all five once only is South Ealing (Mansion House also uses all five but has two O's)

Edited by Nepper

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voltaire60
5 hours ago, Knotty said:

 

Would that be the 1940 Channel Incident by junior Asquith?

If so I think I have identified him at last!

 

 

      Might be-  so who is it?  And explain the references in the clues,if you would

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Knotty

It is Gordon Harker, a comedic/actor active from the 1920’s to the 1950’s. He had several smaller parts until he had a staring role in the 1935 Wil Hay comedy film “Boys will be Boys”.

The Dunkirk reference was to a part played by him in a short 1940 Ministry propaganda film the “Channel Incident” , about a woman (played by Dame Peggy Ashcroft) taking a motor yacht, named “Wanderer”, across the Channel to search and pick up soldiers from the beaches at the same time searching for her husband.

Anthony Asquith was not only the son of the former Prime Minister, he was also the director of the above film.

 

Harker served with the 1/8th Hampshire’s in Gallipoli and Palestine and in 1917 was severely wounded in the leg, which left him with a permanent limp.(A condition exploited in his film career)

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voltaire60
1 minute ago, Knotty said:

It is Gordon Harker, a comedic/actor active from the 1920’s to the 1950’s. He had several smaller parts until he had a staring role in the 1935 Wil Hay comedy film “Boys will be Boys”.

The Dunkirk reference was to a part played by him in a short 1940 Ministry propaganda film the “Channel Incident” , about a woman (played by Dame Peggy Ashcroft) taking a motor yacht, named “Wanderer”, across the Channel to search and pick up soldiers from the beaches at the same time searching for her husband.

Anthony Asquith was not only the son of the former Prime Minister, he was also the director of the above film.

 

Harker served with the 1/8th Hampshire’s in Gallipoli and Palestine and in 1917 was severely wounded in the leg, which left him with a permanent limp.(A condition exploited in his film career)

 

   Spot-on- a largely forgotten figure now.  The Acacia Avenue reference is not to a road in Wandsworth but to a play he appeared in with that name-just to muddy the waters.

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Knotty
8 minutes ago, voltaire60 said:

Acacia Avenue reference

 

Totally missed that posting- sorry, I kept going back to the original posting.

Where did the photo come from? I did not see that one in my delving.

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voltaire60
29 minutes ago, Knotty said:

 

Totally missed that posting- sorry, I kept going back to the original posting.

Where did the photo come from? I did not see that one in my delving.

 

   Getty- with Thanks

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Knotty

Ok, who is this fellow, and what is his naval connection to the Black Sea?

E2FFC299-334B-41E4-A049-C33C01A86537.jpeg

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Knotty

He only served on the Western Front

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Ron Clifton
13 hours ago, Nepper said:

The following only have one vowel but multiple uses of same:- Archway, Balham, Canary Wharf, Chalk Farm, Debden, Holborn, Northolt, Northwood, St. John's Wood, Stepney Green, Temple, Woodford.

 

The only station name using all five once only is South Ealing (Mansion House also uses all five but has two O's)

Thanks Nepper. You obviously have even more spare time than I do!

 

The one I had in mind was St John's Wood, so that must be unique for another reason (the "seasonal reference" I mentioned was to cricket - it is the station for Lord's).

 

Ron

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Knotty

Ok another clue then, he had the same surname as one of Robin Hoods lot!

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David Ridgus
On 23 May 2018 at 16:06, Knotty said:

Ok another clue then, he had the same surname as one of Robin Hoods lot!

 

So presumably he is Private Scarlet or Private Tuck!

 

David

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Fattyowls

Or Miller, or Littlejohn; using 'The Adventures of Robin Hood' as a reference (with baddies played by the former 2nd Lt. B. Rathbone - 2/10th (Scottish) King's Liverpool and Capt. W. C. Rains of the London Scottish).

 

Pete.

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Knotty

Neither of your two David, but Pete he is one of the two names you offered.

He was with the Middlesex Regiment becoming CSM

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voltaire60

 He is:

     (Connection with Black Sea. Not a clue. Unless....... he lived in  Hammersmith....... Crimea Sidings on the Underground Railway-on the way to Portobello Sidings?)

 

    And to follow the Robin Hood connection with the Miiddlesex Regiment, I have just been writing up  one of my local casualties, Captain Duncan Beresford Tuck,  16th att. 2nd Bn dow 30th March 1918 ( died from further damage to wounds on his legs sustained with the Public Schools Bn at Beaumont Hamel, 1st July 1916). In addition, I note another Die-Hard casualty was Private William James Scarlett (yes-really-Will Scarlett,) 1st Bn., killed on the Somme,15th July 1916

 

Company Sergeant Major William Henry Littlejohn 204331. Unit: 1st/7th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment. Death: 20 February 1917, Western Front.

Object description

Son of William and Mary Ann Littlejohn, of London;Husband of Florence Annabel Littlejohn, of 10, Coulter Rd., Hammersmith, London. Civil Servant (Exchequer and Audit Department).
Author of several war poems, the best being published in "The Muse in Arms"- Suvla Bay, A Hospita Ship and A Prayer.  Still stuck on the Black Sea-unless the Allied failure there was because there is another one in the Black Sea as well.

A Prayer

LORD, if it be Thy will
That I enter the great shadowed valley that lies
Silent, just over the hill,
Grant they may say, "There's a comrade that dies
Waving his hand to us still!"


Lord, if there come the end,
Let me find space and breath all the dearest I prize
Into Thy hands to commend:
Then let me go, with my boy's laughing eyes
Smiling a word to a friend.

 
Edited by voltaire60

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voltaire60
On 23/05/2018 at 09:08, Ron Clifton said:

The one I had in mind was St John's Wood, so that must be unique for another reason (the "seasonal reference" I mentioned was to cricket - it is the station for Lord's).

 

     Does your chauffeur not deliver you to the Grace Gates along with a Fortnum and Mason hamper and a couple of bottles  of bubbly?   Standards, dear boy, standards.

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voltaire60

     The  4 regiments and dates below   will link to the 2 regiments and dates  thereafter. Which 2 names  emerge as a result? (Names, Ranks and Serial Numbers,please)

 

1)   Scots Guards.  30th December 1914

 

2)  Duke of Wellington's Regiment          20th December 1917

 

3) East Surrey Regiment              28th September 1916

 

4)  12th Lancers    21st August 1918

 

         This should give you an answer that connects to:

 

Sherwood Foresters     14th  February 1916

 

Loyal North  Lancashire     12th March 1918

 

Not difficult....just a bit different

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