Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Stoppage Drill

Who is This ? ? ?

Recommended Posts

Knotty
7 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

A Hospital Ship

 

Indeed it was William H Littlejohn, and his poem Hospital Ship in Forgotten Poets of the First World War, is illustrated with a photograph of the Russian HS the “Vpered”  sunk in the Black Sea off the Turkish coast on 8th July 1916, by U-38.

 

THERE is a green-lit hospital ship,

Green, with a crimson cross,
Lazily swaying there in the bay,
Lazily bearing my friend away,
Leaving me dull-sensed loss.
Green-lit, red-lit hospital ship,
Numb is my heart, but you carelessly dip
There in the drift of the bay.


There is a green-lit hospital ship,
Dim as the distance grows,
Speedily steaming out of the bay,
Speedily bearing my friend away
Into the orange-rose.
Green-lit, red-lit hospital ship,
Dim are my eyes, but you heedlessly slip
Out of their sight from the bay.

·····

There was a green-lit hospital ship,
Green, with a blood-red cross,
Lazily swaying there in the bay,
But it went out with the light of the day—
Out where the white seas toss.
Green-lit, red-lit hospital ship,
Cold are my hands and trembling my lip:
Did you make home from the bay?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fattyowls
14 minutes ago, Knotty said:

Indeed it was William H Littlejohn, and his poem Hospital Ship in Forgotten Poets of the First World War

 

Is that a book, or Lucy London's rather good website or facebook page? Good find none the less, and I feel proud to have contributed in a small way.

 

Pete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty
10 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

Lucy London's rather good website 

 

Hi Pete

That’s the website I found it on, stumbled onto it whilst searching for someone else sometime backhen WIT was looking at poets.

I actually took some time out to have a wider look and it is a very good reference, the number of names listed is quite surprising, Littlejohn stuck out because of the Hospital ship photo.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ron Clifton
8 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

along with a Fortnum and Mason hamper and a couple of bottles  of bubbly?   Standards, dear boy, standards.

Alas, no. Diabetes, dear boy, diabetes.

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60
34 minutes ago, Ron Clifton said:

Alas, no. Diabetes, dear boy, diabetes.

 

Ron

 

     I am prepared to sacrifice my time on this...if Sir's chauffeur can arrange a time to be at the Grace Gates, then I am prepared to  supervise the disposal of the hamper and the bubbly.  Lords?   yes, every time I go there it is full of completely p*ssed lawyers droning on all day about how much money they make. Drunk before the first ball and slumbering gently long before the first new ball.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60
1 hour ago, Knotty said:

ndeed it was William H Littlejohn, and his poem Hospital Ship in Forgotten Poets of the First World War, is illustrated with a photograph of the Russian HS the “Vpered”  sunk in the Black Sea off the Turkish coast on 8th July 1916, by U-38.

 

 

   That I did not know- I merely thought that Knotty should have attended some more Geography lessons while at school.  Interesting as "Vpered" means "progress" or "forward" and is the title of a Russian "revolutionary journal- which I have buried away in my old bookselling stock- Never thought the name would turn up on GWF!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fattyowls
1 hour ago, Knotty said:

 

Hi Pete

That’s the website I found it on, stumbled onto it whilst searching for someone else sometime backhen WIT was looking at poets.

I actually took some time out to have a wider look and it is a very good reference, the number of names listed is quite surprising, Littlejohn stuck out because of the Hospital ship photo.

 

I like Lucy's site as among many other things it provides a good counterpoint to the adulation of a certain stationmaster's son who spent his adolescence in Birkenhead. Lucy was kind enough to help me when i was writing something about war poetry; she is a star. As a website goes Women Poets of WW1 is none too shabby either.

 

Pete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uncle George

V60's conundrum is proving most difficult. While we try and work it out, who might this chap be?

 

You may recall that when I posted #9670, it was confidently stated in reply that "it cannot be a UK general, because of the beard." But you will remember that he was a UK general -  the Reverend  Dr. J.M.Sims. Principal Chaplain to the BEF.  Which explained the beard.

 

But this chap was not a padre of any stripe. He had command of a Brigade in the British Army.  Who was he, and how did he get away with the beard ? ? ?

 

 

image.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60
Knotty

In case anyone is wondering about the absence of our Pal “neverforget”on WiT recently, he has had a few ups and downs, I won’t go into details on his downs but the big up is he became a grandad again this week whilst on a break in York.

He wishes to be remembered and will return to the fray quite soon.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60

    OK- a final clue- Can't  really make any eauier without putting up neon display lights.

21st August 1918 refers to this man, Major (On CWGC Lt-Col.) Ronald Beaumont Wood, 12th Lancers , attached 6th Tanks.  Killed in action on the Western Front. Not surprisingly, given his peacetime regiment, a good polo player. Photograph with thanks to IWM

 

Image result for ronald wood lancers

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Very good Mr V, a novel twist on proceedings

 

Charles Watts 6303 - Brompton

M Jagger Sgt  386 -Talana

K A Richards 12396-Etaples

R B Wood Lt-Col - Bienvillers

 

B Rolling 17281- Ypres (Menin)

G Stones 241852-Laventie

 

Now back to the bearded one!

Edited by Knotty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60

  Well done,Knotty- a Bank Holiday treat. Couldn't get more obvious than someone called Ronnie Wood!   There is a serious point- it may seem disrespectful to use the names of those killed for a light-hearted  post on GWF. But look at what happens in Israel- the war grave of Harry Potter is now featured as a tourist attraction-not for anything he did,just that J.K.Rowling came along later

   Now back to the bearded one. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

I should have posted sooner but for some reason l was trying to tie the last two up with Brian Jones and Mick Taylor, took a while for the penny to drop. Can’t blame my age as one M Jagger was cavorting around the stage the other night I believe.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ron Clifton
9 hours ago, Knotty said:

M Jagger Sgt  386 -Talana

Was this the sculptor Sergeant Jagger who carved the Royal Artillery memorial?

 

As to the bearded one, is he one of the commodores who commanded the 1st and 2nd Naval Brigades in the RND?

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uncle George
2 hours ago, Ron Clifton said:

 

As to the bearded one, is he one of the commodores who commanded the 1st and 2nd Naval Brigades in the RND?

 

Ron

 

He is not. Here's a heavy clue:

 

 

image.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Knotty

Thanks for the clue UG which gave me the 51st Highland Division.

 

He is Brigadier-General Sir W. C. Ross, K.B.E., C.B., C.M.G. who was given command of 152 Infantry Brigade in Nov 1914, and the 1st Highland Brigade 1915/16, then on to the 228 Brigade in Salonika from 1916 to the end of hostilities.

 

His beard was grown to cover the result of an incident during the Boer War, whilst commanding the 8th Mounted Infantry at Bothaville on 6th November 1900, during a surprise attack on De Wet's Boer Commando, his lower jaw was destroyed by a bullet and he nearly died.

 

The sketch is by Fred A Farrell from his “The 51st Division War Sketches”

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uncle George
22 minutes ago, Knotty said:

Thanks for the clue UG which gave me the 51st Highland Division.

 

He is Brigadier-General Sir W. C. Ross, K.B.E., C.B., C.M.G. who was given command of 152 Infantry Brigade in Nov 1914, and the 1st Highland Brigade 1915/16, then on to the 228 Brigade in Salonika from 1916 to the end of hostilities.

 

His beard was grown to cover the result of an incident during the Boer War, whilst commanding the 8th Mounted Infantry at Bothaville on 6th November 1900, during a surprise attack on De Wet's Boer Commando, his lower jaw was destroyed by a bullet and he nearly died.

 

The sketch is by Fred A Farrell from his “The 51st Division War Sketches”

 

Correct on all counts. Well done indeed.

 

" ... Nor was their agony brief, or once only imposed on them. 
    The wounded, the war-spent, the sick received no exemption: 
    Being cured they returned and endured and achieved our redemption ... "

 

 

image.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60

And this chap?    There is a link with Brigadier-General Ross, above.   Our man did not survive the war.  He looks like a young Arthur Tedder  but is not.  Our man never saw front-line service, being described as  "poor boy" by Sister Agnes (That's a big clue) (And,No, not the lovely Miranda Richardson in "Blackadder")

    No cheating now- the name will come up with a mouse over the pic. Too thick to remove it

 

hr-lumley1.jpg?w=645

Edited by voltaire60

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uncle George
1 hour ago, voltaire60 said:

And this chap?    There is a link with Brigadier-General Ross, above.   Our man did not survive the war.  He looks like a young Arthur Tedder  but is not.  Our man never saw front-line service, being described as  "poor boy" by Sister Agnes (That's a big clue) (And,No, not the lovely Miranda Richardson in "Blackadder")

    No cheating now- the name will come up with a mouse over the pic. Too thick to remove it

 

hr-lumley1.jpg?w=645

 

Too generous of a clue! He is Henry Lumley. "Not for the squeamish" indeed.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60
21 minutes ago, Uncle George said:

 

Too generous of a clue! He is Henry Lumley. "Not for the squeamish" indeed.

 

 Well yes, it is squeamish-but only up to a point Lord Copper. The story of Henry Lumley is but one of the myriad tragedies we call "The Great War".  Yes, it is good to remember Harold Gillies, Macindoe and the developments in plastic surgery -particularly maxilofacial- but it was not a happy progress to a fore-destined end. It was a road marked with tragedy and loss-Henry Lumley was one. Too simplistic to say that "we learned from our mistakes" when "mistake" was a synonym for" death"

    The Great War has become far too tidy. Not for the squeamish . But surely war is just squeamishness writ large?    It's one reason why I do not like the present set-up at IWM-  if you go there then,apart from the poppy motif hither and thither, the colour red is conspicuously absent- and that is not an accident. Memorialisation is "managed" for present-day concerns and "outcomes".  We have a politically correct  Great War.  The pictures below of Henry :Lumley should be colourised and printed up on banners a hundred feet high and put outside IWM instead of the guns from HMS Terrible. But that might put off children from coming to the museum. And the tills would stop ringing.

  As Sherman said, "War is Hell" Not a bl***dy  theme park.

 

P33P6

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Uncle George

A politically correct Great War. I agree. But it was right I think for that website to put up the "not suitable for the squeamish" warning (which I was [mis]quoting). Many are easily offended, and one does not wish to give offence.

 

https://greatwarlondon.wordpress.com/2012/10/24/hr-lumley-facial-surgery/

 

The poppy has in my view been hijacked - a quiet symbol of gratitude and remembrance and contemplation has (witness the vulgar Tower of London display which was so unaccountably lauded) become more about the artist than anything else.

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Fattyowls

A harrowing story that needs telling M. V. An excellent find.

 

Pete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
voltaire60

 

Real Poppy Earrings

Real Poppy Earrings
£25.00

     Available from IWM Shop Online.  But the motif must work-whenever I wear the poppy earrings it always causes comment. As if.

 

   Henry Lumley was not put up as an excuse for a rant. I came across him doing a bit of reading for another RFC accident casualty who is local. But it does remind us that something considered generally "good" as an outcome-developments in medicine such as plastic surgery come at the cost of the deaths of many of the servicemen involved- a process that could not  take place in peacetime if that number of deaths had resulted in a medical "advance". Never get past NICE and Medical Research Council. A reminder that even for medicine, then lives were more "expendable" in a "good cause". An old friend- a retired medical researcher was thinking of doing a book on all of this sort of stuff-transplants, Tycho Brahe's nose, Washington's teeth- all the "make and mend" that medicine has devised- he even had the title-"Breaking for Parts". 

  We can colourise black and white pictures, retrieve the written word, record veterans,etc- the one thing we cannot re-create is-thankfully- pain.  Look at the recent WIT- Gordon Harker-left with a permanent limp from war wounds-literally, for him, the war lasted with every step he took for the rest of his life.

    How much of our modern stock of what is "good" history about the Great War has been massaged-accidentally or by delliberate act-is something that intrigues me. I fear that many veterans of the Great War would not recognize,say,what IWM is offering as compatible with their experience. And the big question in all this- Are we remembering the past-or  manipulating  the future?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ron Clifton
2 hours ago, voltaire60 said:

I fear that many veterans of the Great War would not recognize,say,what IWM is offering as compatible with their experience. And the big question in all this- Are we remembering the past-or  manipulating  the future?

It could well be argued (by me, anyway) that the history of any major event cannot be completed until all those who have taken part in it have died, since their experiences are influenced by their recollections of their part in it and cannot, therefore, be regarded as technically unbiased.

 

We have to begin by re-naming Captain Dunn's famous book as "The War in France that 2nd Bn Royal Welsh Fusiliers Knew."

 

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...