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Remembered Today:

Northumbrian Gunner meanderings

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Tynemouth RGA - Siege Batteries

The Royal Naval dominance of the North Sea reduced the German threat on the coast and the requirement for coastal artillery. This coincided with increased demand for heavy artillery for the Western Front, and skilled RGA gunners to man those guns. Consequently RGA gunners from the coastal batteries were formed into siege batteries for deployment overseas. The coastal units would also provide the basis for training and the raising of future RGA Batteries. The following Siege Batteries were for

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Durham RGA - Siege Batteries

The Royal Naval dominance of the North Sea reduced the German threat on the coast and the requirement for coastal artillery. This coincided with increased demand for heavy artillery for the Western Front, and skilled RGA gunners to man those guns. Consequently RGA gunners from the coastal batteries were formed into siege batteries for deployment overseas. The coastal units would also provide the basis for training and the raising of future RGA Batteries. The following Siege Batteries were for

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

IWM - Nery Gun

Visited the Imperial War Museum London contains the Nery Gun which was engaged in the Action at Nery 1st September 1914 resulting in the awarding of 3 Victoria Crosses. Nery Gun Imperial War Museum Nery Gun Imperial War Museum During the Retreat from Mons the 1st Cavalry Brigade were on the western flank of the British Expeditionary Force (BEF). In support of the Brigade were III Brigade RHA (D & E Bty) and VII RHA (I & L Bty). On the night of the night of the 31st Aug

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

IWM - Le Cateau VC's

On a recent visit to Imperial War Museum London took the opportunity to visit the Lord Ashcroft Gallery to view two of the three VC's awarded at Le Cateau. Visited the battlefield in 2014 and saw the area from where the guns were saved: Le Cateau - Saving the Guns During the battle, the 37th Howitzer Battery RFA had withdrawn 4 guns. Captain Douglas Reynolds found two horse teams when he retired to Remount, and decided to rescue the remaining two howitzers. He called for volunteers to assist

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company 18 Pounder Gun Project

allowfullscreen allowfullscreen> The Royal Australian Artillery Historical Company (RAAHC) has undertaken a project to create an original WW1 18 Pounder gun team. The project will involve the restoration of an 18 Pounder, its ammunition limber, the acquisition/restoration of harness and saddles, the recruitment of gun detachments, the acquisition of horses and the replication of period uniforms. The RAAHC state that their vision is "to provide a living memorial to Australian Artillery by de

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Gunner George Grey Lawson AFA

A request from sandybee49 for the grave of an Australian soldier buried in Bedlington St Cuthbert Northumberland reveals he was a Gunner in the Australian Field Artillery. Sandybee's website WW1 Australian Soldiers & Nurses Who rest in the united kingdom http://ww1austburialsuk.weebly.com. Gunner George Grey Lawson CWGC Information LAWSON, GEORGE GREY Rank: Gunner Service No: 1871 Date of Death: 22/01/1917 Regiment/Service: Australian Fi

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: The Territorial Force Artillery Training Schools

Source: The Territorial Force Artillery Training Schools Recent blog posts on the training of Royal garrison Artillery at Coastal Units (Tynemouth RGA and Durham RGA) reminded me of David Porter's excellent 1,000th post which outlines the establishment of Territorial Force Artillery Training Schools. These were effectively the 3rd Line units of the Territorials established in 1915 as both 1st line and 2nd line units deployed overseas.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

First Gunner VC of WW1

On the 24th August 1914 the 5th Division of the British Expeditionary Force were withdrawing south from the Conde- Mons canal. To protect their flank the divisional reserve was ordered from their position in Dour to form a flank guard in a blocking position between Audregnies and Elouges. The flank guard at Elouges consisted of 1st Norfolf Regiment and 1st Cheshire Regiment, their artillery support being provided by 119th Field Battery Royal Field Artillery. The battery was commanded by Major E

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

One of the first RA Casualties in Battle

The CWGC records 6 casualties on the 23rd August 1914, one of whom is buried near the first ever British battle casualty in St Symphorien Cemetery, Mons, Belgium Driver Edgar Towse was killed during the Battle of Mons 23rd August 1914 aged 29. He served with 23rd Battery, 40th Brigade Royal Field Artillery, who were positioned on La Boit Haut. The OH records: "the 23rd Battery had received orders to retire from the summit of Bois la Haut, and selected as its route a sunken lane leading due so

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

First British Artilley round fired on Western Front

While researching the battle of Mons a while ago I started a post about the First British Artillery round fired on the Western Front. First Artillery rounds fired Aug 1914 On a recent trip to Mons I finally got to visit the location. [Latitude 50°25'36.67"N Longitude 4° 7'53.40"E] On the 22nd August 1914 British cavalry were holding bridges in the area of Peronnes, east of the main BEF positions in the Mons area. A troop from 16th Lancers were enraged by an enemy patrol, and to cove

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

RA Development 1899 - 1914

I have just being reading The History of the Royal Artillery from the Indian Mutnity to the Great War by Sir John Headlam. Tracing the Royal Artillery over the period it chronicles vital developments in organisation, doctrine and the work of the equipment committees. It seems there were some farsighted Gunners who were able to shape the Royal Artillery so by 1914 it was able to fulfil it's role in a European War. One wonders what would have happened in the early days of the BEF of 1914 if this

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

THE DESTRUCTION OF A FOKKER : our mobile anti-aircraft guns in action

THE DESTRUCTION OF A FOKKER : our mobile anti-aircraft guns in action Anti-aircraft artillery in action. Appreciate the film is staged managed, so I wonder if AA Artillery did actually chase along the road after aircraft. With everyone in the detachment hanging onto the lorry as it gives chase I could not help thinking it looked like the keystone cops, though 30 seconds from stopping to first round fired is certainly not a comedy routine. Rousing cheer at the end when they get the Fokker !!!!

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: The Value of Frogs on Active Service

Fascinating post by alan two of an extract of the war diary of 15th Brigade RHA and how they supplemented their rations in Gallipoli by eating frogs. Not something I tried when supplementing rations. Entry image is from the Gallipoli Association. Should I categorise this entry under RA Animals ? Source: The Value of Frogs on Active Service

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

THE WORK OF THE ARMY VETERINARY CORPS

THE WORK OF THE ARMY VETERINARY CORPS : and how it is helped by the RSPCA http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/1060022634 Catalogue number IWM 114 Production date 1916-06-12 Place made GB Object description The British Army Veterinary Hospital at Neufchâtel, near Dieppe, France, spring 1916. Full description An unfinished stable at the hospital, "will you help the RSPCA to complete it ?". A group of three horses. A wounded horse being attended to at a mobile veterinary se

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl


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