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Remembered Today:

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About this blog

Royal Artillery topics

Information and topics relating to the Gunners of the Royal Horse Artillery, Royal Field Artillery, and the Royal Garrison Artillery during the First World War. 

As I meander through research, battlefield tours and contributions to the GWF Forum, certain topics arise an interest which I record here. 

 

Entries in this blog

Conveying A Field Gun Across The Yser Canal Under Fire

An interesting pistol gun action took place in early 1915,  conducted by a gun from 135 Battery, 32 Brigade RFA, part of the 4th Divisional Artillery. The 4th Division were located north of Ypres, bounded by the Ypres to Thourout railway. The 32nd Brigade RFA were in support of an assault by 1st Battalion Rifle Brigade which took place on 6th July 1915 south of Boesinghe. The assault would be conducted in 4 phases with each of 32 Brigade's batteries allotted objectives to eng

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl in Artillery Action

First British Artilley round fired on Western Front

At 11:00 hours on the 22nd August 1914 at Bray, Belgium,C Sub-section of E Battery Royal Horse Artillery fired the first British Artillery rounds of the First World War on the Western Front. [1] 1914 - First round fired by RA on the Western Front British cavalry were holding bridges in the area of Peronnes, east of the main BEF positions in the Mons area. In support were the 13 pounder gun batteries of the Royal Horse Artillery. A troop from  16th  Lancers were enraged an enemy pa

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl in Artillery Action

Easter Rising 1916 Artillery

Reading an article on Forces News Ireland On Stage – The 1916 Easter Rising it outlined that "a four-gun battery of field artillery pieces" formed part of the British response to the uprising. I wondered which unit the guns came from and what actions they took during the six days of the Easter Rising.   One interesting snippet outlined  ‘Field’ artillery is the key here though, since gunners soon found that, without the traction found on grass or mud, firing their guns on the smoothly-

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl in Artillery Action

Cologne Bridgehead

The terms of the Armistice signed 11th November 1918 contained clauses as to what German Forces were to do on cessation of hostilities. Article 1 detailing the Military Clauses on the Western Front required in clause two  "Immediate evacuation of invaded countries". To provide further security, particularly at the insistence pf the French, clause five required "Evacuation by the German armies of the countries on the left bank of the Rhine."   Clause five further

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl in Artillery Action

Northumbrian Gunners New Year 1916

New Year 1916 would be the first, and only, time that the Northumbrian Gunners of 250 Brigade RFA (1st Northumbrian Brigade) would spend in the trenches. New Year 1917 would see them in billets resting, and New Year 1918 in Camp starting to demobilise and return home.    At midnight on 31st December 1915 / 1st January 1916 the Northumbrian Territorials were situated in the vicinity of Kemmel and Wytschaete at Kruistraat seeing the new Year in with a firing display.    The War

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl in Artillery Action

Amiens Gun - 374 SB Paris

Whilst reviewing the Fourth Army A & Q War Diary WO95- 445-2 I came across a Movement Order for a German 11inch gun and a detachment of 374 Siege Battery from Picquigny, 13km north west of Amiens to Paris. The entry sounded as if from Blackadder goes forth;   And might I suggest sir that having left the trenches, it might be a good idea to post our man to Paris Source: Black Adder IV - Episode 1 - Captain Cook.   So why were a detachment of 374 Siege Battery taking a

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl in Artillery Action

Albert Leaning Virgin Shoot

An interesting post by  BIFFO   shows an extract from the 13th Battalion Welsh Regiment war diary which recounts the toppling of the Leaning Virgin of Albert by British Artillery.   ALL artillery fans go stand in the corner   The Leaning Virgin was a familiar sight to soldiers on the Somme when passing through Albert. The statue remained in its precarious position from January 1915 until it was toppled by British Artillery in April 1918.   British Toops p

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl in Artillery Action

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