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1914 Indirect v Direct Fire

An extremely interesting video on you tube contrasting the British 18 pounder versus the German Field Howitzer, though I believe the main comparisons are between indirect / direct fire and the use of Shrapnel versus HE - hence the blog title. It contrasts the British doctrine an the beginning of the war which was based upon direct fire with shrapnel to support the infantry, and the Germans who were more inclined to adopt indirect fire with HE as the modus operendi. The primary function of 18 p

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Remembered Today: Serjeant A E GOODERHAM, 3rd Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery who died 23 June 1915, Hull Western Cemetery

Remembered Today: Serjeant A E GOODERHAM, 3rd Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery who died 23 June 1915, Hull Western Cemetery CWGC Information GOODERHAM, A E Rank: Serjeant Service No: 19738 Date of Death: 23/06/1915 Age: 29 Regiment/Service: Royal Garrison Artillery 3rd Siege Bty. Grave Reference 455. 43942. Cemetery HULL WESTERN CEMETERY Additional Information: Son of Mr. F. and Mrs. L. Gooderham, of

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: War horses found during dig at the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, 20/6/12

Fascinating post by chrislock and thanks to The true war horses were the unsung hero's of the British gun and transport teams. In this they were were not as lucky as War Horse David. The remains of 3 horses being found during work around the Menin Gate. There was a lot of road works going on when I was there a few weeks ago. Source: War horses found during dig at the Menin Gate Memorial, Ypres, 20/6/12

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Artillery of the Great War - Landships

Excellent site which has detailed information on Artillery of the Great War This site is dedicated to World War One Military Hardware. And to the Modelling of this stuff. Landships Even a forum with a dedicated section on Artillery Landships WW1 Forum Artillery Added a block to the blog sidebar Artillery of the The Great War British Guns 13-pdr QF Field Gun 18 pdr QF Field Gun 4.5inch QF Howitzer 60-Pounder BL Mk I Field Gun 6inch 26cwt Howitzer BL 6inch 30cwt Howitzer 8inch Howitz

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: British Gun Carrier Units

Source: British Gun Carrier Units Many thanks to sotonmate for pointing me in the right direction regarding the British Gun Carrier units. So I downloaded the diaries to find that they also contained a short history of the unit.... Initially during the experimental stage the gun carrying tanks were manned by the Royal Garrison Artillery and Army Service Corps drivers. Initially formed into independant sections of 6 tanks, they were embodied into the Tank Corps. The RGA provided one NCO per

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

British Gun Carrier

Always learning on the forum. Source: Artillery mounted on caterpillar tracks? The British had 48 tracked carriers for moving guns as prime movers. They were not self propelled artillery, they did not fire from this platform. Source: Landships google Homepage - British Tank actions of the First World War Gun Carriers List Courtesy of wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia...._Carrier_Mark_I During 1916 it became clear that in case of a breakthrough, the very purpose of the first tank, the Mark

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

2/Lt Osmer Noel Stewart M.C.

Came across the grave of this chap when I visited the Ypres Reservoir Cemetery in Ypres. Second Lieutenant Osmer Noel Stewart. Royal Field Artillery Commissioned 9th May 1916 aged 18, gazetted with the Military Cross 18th July 1917, died 31st July 1917 aged 19. His commissioned service lasted 1 year, 2 months, 23 days. Osmer Noel Stewart was born in Toxteth Park, Lancashire in 1898. His commission to the Regular Army was published in the London Gazette 9th May 1916 page 4560 REGULAR FORCES

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: War Horse 'David' 107th Battery RFA

Source: War Horse 'David' 107th Battery RFA This grand old soldier served throuhout the Boer War, then from Mons to the Armistice - a true "War Horse" David was one of the many horses which that served the Royal Regiment, a reminder that Artillery during this period was reliant on the horse as the prime mover. The Royal Field and Royal Horse artillery were totally dependant on horse transport, and whilst traction engines became available to the RGA, there were still many horses required for

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Remembered Today: Gunner J LEITH, 107 Brigade Royal Field Artillery

Remembered Today: Gunner J LEITH, 107 Brigade Royal Field Artillery, who died on 1 June 1917, Railway Dugouts Burial Ground Found an excellent site recording details of John Leith from Aberdeenshire http://www.kinnethmont.co.uk/1914-1918_files/john-leith.htm http://www.kinnethmont.co.uk/soldiers/john-leith.htm Gunner John Leith, 107th Bde, Royal Field Artillery John Leith, the second son son of John and Jane Leith, was born on 6th November 1896 on the family farm of Courtieston, Lesli

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Ypres - Royal Artillery

Just back from a quick day in Ypres. An opportunity to spend some time at the Menin Gate The Menin Gate lists 477 names for those lost from the Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. The names are listed on panles 5 and 9, either side of the north archway. There are 112 names for those lost from the Royal Garrison Artillery,these being inscribed on panel 9, to the right of the north arch. Menin Gate - Royal Horse Artillery and Royal Horse Artillery Menin Gate - Royal Garris

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Indian Mountain Artillery 1914 - 1918

I have just been reading of the Indian Mountain Artillery in the Great War. An interesting account of the Gunners from India and their Trusted Friends Indian Mountain Artillery by Brigadier CAL Graham. Their actions saw Batteries engaged in Gallipoli, East Africa, Mesopotamia, Persia and Iraq, Their contribution clearly upholding the motto of the Royal Regiment of Artillery – Ubique. The very nature of their equipment, guns broken down into mule loads, meant they could support the infantry

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: was it safer being an artillery man than a simple soldier

An interesting question raised by mags "was it safer being an artillery man than a simple soldier ". From Tom's analysis of Statistics of the Military Effort of the British Empire during the Great War 1914 – 1920 it would appear that surviving unscathed was more likely as a gunner than an infantry man. If one considers that the main threat to the artillery man was counter battery fire, the infantry were subject to the same risk as bombardment of trenches and lines of communication were also pre

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Conveying A Field Gun Across The YSER Canal Under Fire

The use of a 'pistol gun' being moved forward to engage a particular target using direct fire is a useful mechanism to destroy or suppress a particular strongpoint. In July 1915 the pistol action was conducted by floating the gun across the Yser under fire on a raft, landing the gun then destroying a sap and entanglements. An outstanding action !!!!! During the operations south of Pilkem, between the 6th and 8th of July 1915, the British trenches were within sixty yards of a German sap, wh

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: Lance Bombardier & Bombardier in the RA

The rank structure within the Royal Regiment can cause confusion around lance bombardiers / bombardiers and corporals, not to mention that the gun above a sergeant stripes means every body thinks he is a staff sergeant. A very interesting ACI appears from Kevin adds further to this confusion !!! For anyone who may be interested I will post the ACI 1743 instruction dated 30th November 1917. This is the reference one most often sees in gunners records. This has been crossed out on the page,

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Duties of a Section Commander

Notes from a Section Commanders note book recording his duties before action and in action. Section Commanders duties before ACTION Section Commanders duties IN ACTION

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

293 Siege Battery - New RGA website

Any new web site on the Royal Artillery is welcome and a great deal of work and research by seany [/url] has obviously been undertaken to bring us this interesting resource. http://293siegebattery.webplus.net/ Source: New RGA website Even better looking at seany's grandfather who he has been researching; Scotswood – Newcastle-upon-Tyne "George Hamilton finished his last shift serving the blast furnaces of Armstrong’sworks in Newcastle". - a Tyneside Gunner Very interesting following the d

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Remembered Today: Gunner William Corbett FOSTER, 46th Heavy Trench Mortar Battery, RFA who died on 8th January 1917, Foncquevillers Military Cemetery

Remembered Today: Gunner William Corbett FOSTER, 46th Heavy Trench Mortar Battery, RFA who died on 8th January 1917, Foncquevillers Military Cemetery William Corbett Foster of Wolverhampton was died 8th January 1917 whist serving with the Trench Mortar Battery of the Territorial 46th (North Midland Division). The 46th Heavy Battery were formed 20th June 1916. Long Long Trail: 46th (North Midland) Division CWGC Information Name: FOSTER, WILLIAM CORB

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Barr & Stroud Range finder

A post regarding a Barr & Stroud Range finder prompted some research into this interesting piece of equipment, Used by both the Artillery and Infantry to determine ranges to targets. Barr & Stroud Range finder (Front View) Barr & Stroud Range finder (Rear View) The principle is the instrument formed a fixed length base with prisms at each end picking up the target, so effectively forming two triangles, allowing trigonometrical principles to determine the range. One eyepiece was

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Artillery in the Great War - Strong and Marble

Just finished reading what I found was a fascinating book. Moving through the Great War it documents the development of the use of Artillery by all the major Armies, British, German, French, Russian, Austro-Hungarian, as well as Italian, Serbian, Bulgarian, Romanian and American. Looking at the development as a whole across the Western, Eastern Fronts and the Italian campaign, one can see that the Artillery War went beyond the trenches of the Western Front. The impact of Artillery I think is

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Remembered Today: Gunner John RADFORD, Royal Field Artillery, who died on 28th November 1916, Port Said War Memorial Cemetery

Remembered Today: Gunner John RADFORD, Royal Field Artillery, who died on 28th November 1916, Port Said War Memorial Cemetery Territorial from 211th Brigade RFA , formerly 2nd East Lancashire Brigade RFA, the Batteries, 15th / 16th / 17th Lancashire Batteries being based in Hyde Road, Manchester. They provided the Divisional Artillery support for the 42nd (East Lancashire)Division. Long Long Trail: 42nd (East Lancashire) Division The East Lancashire Division were the first Territorial Div

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Remembered Today: 2nd Lt Wilfred Seaton Baggot PARRY

Remembered Today: 2nd Lt Wilfred Seaton Baggot PARRY, 53 Brigade Royal Field Artillery, who died on 24th November 1915, Bedford House Cemetery From the Long Long Trail the 53rd Brigade RFA were part of the 9th (Scottish) Division, a K1 New Army Division deploying to France 9th - 12th May 1915. The Division were engaged in the Battle of Loos 25th September to 18th October 1915. From the London Gazette it would appear 2/Lt Parry was commissioned as a temporary Second Lieutenant 27th January 1915

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl


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