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Remembered Today:

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About this blog

Royal Artillery topics

Information and topics relating to the Gunners of the Royal Horse Artillery, Royal Field Artillery, and the Royal Garrison Artillery during the First World War. 

As I meander through research, battlefield tours and contributions to the GWF Forum, certain topics arise an interest which I record here. 

 

Entries in this blog

From: The Territorial Force Artillery Training Schools

Source: The Territorial Force Artillery Training Schools Recent blog posts on the training of Royal garrison Artillery at Coastal Units (Tynemouth RGA and Durham RGA) reminded me of David Porter's excellent 1,000th post which outlines the establishment of Territorial Force Artillery Training Schools. These were effectively the 3rd Line units of the Territorials established in 1915 as both 1st line and 2nd line units deployed overseas.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

First Gunner VC of WW1

On the 24th August 1914 the 5th Division of the British Expeditionary Force were withdrawing south from the Conde- Mons canal. To protect their flank the divisional reserve was ordered from their position in Dour to form a flank guard in a blocking position between Audregnies and Elouges. The flank guard at Elouges consisted of 1st Norfolf Regiment and 1st Cheshire Regiment, their artillery support being provided by 119th Field Battery Royal Field Artillery. The battery was commanded by Major E

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

One of the first RA Casualties in Battle

The CWGC records 6 casualties on the 23rd August 1914, one of whom is buried near the first ever British battle casualty in St Symphorien Cemetery, Mons, Belgium Driver Edgar Towse was killed during the Battle of Mons 23rd August 1914 aged 29. He served with 23rd Battery, 40th Brigade Royal Field Artillery, who were positioned on La Boit Haut. The OH records: "the 23rd Battery had received orders to retire from the summit of Bois la Haut, and selected as its route a sunken lane leading due so

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

RA Development 1899 - 1914

I have just being reading The History of the Royal Artillery from the Indian Mutnity to the Great War by Sir John Headlam. Tracing the Royal Artillery over the period it chronicles vital developments in organisation, doctrine and the work of the equipment committees. It seems there were some farsighted Gunners who were able to shape the Royal Artillery so by 1914 it was able to fulfil it's role in a European War. One wonders what would have happened in the early days of the BEF of 1914 if this

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

THE DESTRUCTION OF A FOKKER : our mobile anti-aircraft guns in action

THE DESTRUCTION OF A FOKKER : our mobile anti-aircraft guns in action Anti-aircraft artillery in action. Appreciate the film is staged managed, so I wonder if AA Artillery did actually chase along the road after aircraft. With everyone in the detachment hanging onto the lorry as it gives chase I could not help thinking it looked like the keystone cops, though 30 seconds from stopping to first round fired is certainly not a comedy routine. Rousing cheer at the end when they get the Fokker !!!!

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

From: The Value of Frogs on Active Service

Fascinating post by alan two of an extract of the war diary of 15th Brigade RHA and how they supplemented their rations in Gallipoli by eating frogs. Not something I tried when supplementing rations. Entry image is from the Gallipoli Association. Should I categorise this entry under RA Animals ? Source: The Value of Frogs on Active Service

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

THE WORK OF THE ARMY VETERINARY CORPS

THE WORK OF THE ARMY VETERINARY CORPS : and how it is helped by the RSPCA http://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/1060022634 Catalogue number IWM 114 Production date 1916-06-12 Place made GB Object description The British Army Veterinary Hospital at Neufchâtel, near Dieppe, France, spring 1916. Full description An unfinished stable at the hospital, "will you help the RSPCA to complete it ?". A group of three horses. A wounded horse being attended to at a mobile veterinary sect

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

WITH BRITAIN'S MONSTER GUNS IN ACTION

Interesting film of 12 inch howitzers in action, both rail and road, observation from aircraft, then King George V inspecting the 14 inch rail gun "Boche Buster". Impressed with the drills on the rail howitzer considering it is a 850lb (386kg) shell they are using. Layer at work on his sights, breach being prepared and round loaded whilst the next one is already been hoisted - good concurrent activity. The rate of fire is good, certainly heavy work, but looks a good team. Air observation whils

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

From: "Synchronising watches" and war time

A while ago there were discussion around Time - so vital for the co-ordination of artillery with other arms. Gunner Time was the time of the formation in my days, from Corps (yes we used to have them) down to section . As well as routine time signals, it was normal to request time before any fireplan in order that the exact time could be confirmed. Gunner Time I came across this post (thanks jhill) which outlines the precise mechanism ordered by the Canadian Corps. Interestingly they required

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Evolution of field artillery tactics, technique, and organization on the western front during the World War

From the United States Combined Arms Research Library CARL Evolution of field artillery tactics, technique, and organization on the western front during the World War http://cgsc.contentd...ilename/945.pdf Collection CGSS Student Papers, 1930-1936 Title Evolution of field artillery tactics, technique, and organization on the western front during the World War. Author Griner, George W. Abstract T

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Study of the artillery support for the landing by the British on Gallipoli on April 25th

Another excellent find by Mike aka Skipman from the United States Combined Arms Research Library CARL Study of the artillery support for the landing by the British on Gallipoli on April 25th http://cgsc.contentdm.oclc.org/cdm/ref/collection/p4013coll14/id/375 Collection CGSS Student Papers, 1930-1936 Title Study of the artillery support for the landing by the British on Gallipoli on April 25th.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Remembered Today: Gunner Horace ROBERTS RGA who died on 13th July 1918

Remembered Today: Gunner Horace ROBERTS, 41st Siege Battery Royal Garrison Artillery who died on 13th July 1918, Vignacourt British Cemetery CWGC Information ROBERTS, HORACE Rank: Gunner Service No: 124050 Date of Death: 13/07/1918 Age: 21 Regiment/Service: Royal Garrison Artillery 41st Siege Bty. Grave ReferenceIV. B. 18. Cemetery VIGNACOURT BRITISH CEMETERY Additional Information: Son of Thomas H. and Esther Elizabeth Roberts, of 4, Bango

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Sad Disaster D/312 Battery 26-May-1917

Came accross an account from the War services of the 62nd West Riding Divisional Artillery whilst researching one of those remembered on Remembered Today. In one incident D/312 battery lost two officers, all thier number ones and experienced soldiers. A tragic loss of life that removed many of the key elements for the running of an efficient battery. Thanks to ororkep aka Paul the war diary entry has been recorded on another post: http://1914-1918.inv...23 26/5/17, at St. Mein. Time 1.30pm.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Remembered Today: Gunner 48865 RFA John BOYD who died 26 May 1917

Remembered Today: Gunner 48865 John BOYD, D Battery 312 Bgde Royal Field Artillery, HAC Cemetery Ecoust-St Main CWGC Information BOYD, JOHN Rank: Gunner Service No: 48865 Date of Death: 26/05/1917 Age: 29 Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery "D" Bty. 312th Bde. Grave Reference III. B. 26. Cemetery H.A.C. CEMETERY, ECOUST-ST. MEIN Additional Information: Son of Patrick and Ellen Boyd, of Knockmo

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

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