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City and County of Cork War Dead


Gerry White
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Congratulations and well done on the book, I was just wondering if this man was included

C.P. Foley 4255 2nd Batt RMF KIA 24/8/1916, born in Gravesend Kent to Irish parents but in a

casualty report in the Irish Times late 1916 his place of residence is listed as Cork.

post-10169-1273264821.png

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Hi Murrough,

At first glance it appears that he is not, however names were being added up to the day before the book went to the printers, so I will double check. Do you by chance have any other info on him to link him to Cork as there is nothing on the census or the CWGC entry as it stands.

Regards

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Dear Gerry, Here are a couple of posts from Boards.ie about some Cork men. Am concerned some of these names may have been overlooked. Is it too late?

Johnny Conn

Men of Cork in 16th KRRC (Church Lads Brigade)

I have been researching Irish men who were former members of the Church Lads Brigade who joined the 16th Battalion Kings Royal Rifle Corps. A group of men joined from the CLB in Cork. I notice that a couple are missing from the list given in an earlier thread. If you do not mind, I would like to give information about these brave men.

Charles Harkness, C/738, died of wounds, 22nd June 1916, following trench raids.

Herbert Hassell (Hassall?), C/1422, killed at High Wood, 15th July.

Herbert Doyle, C/378, killed 6th November 1916, during an attack on Hazy Trench, east of Les Boeufs.

Thomas Wagner, C/807, killed 6th November 1916, see Doyle.

William Pulvertaft, C/668, killed 27th September 1917, operations near Menin Road.

Harkness and Doyle were not on the list.

There were other CLB lads from Portrush and Limerick and together they formed the Irishman's Platoon, two of whom were awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal.

link ...... http://www.corkrecords.com/Shed/WWIStNicholas.htm

Thanks for your reply enfield. I would be concerned that Harkness and Doyle are omitted from this book. In SDGW it says Harkness was born in Tipperary and Doyle was born in Oswaldtwistle, Lancs. They both enrolled in Cork and both are commemorated on the War Memorial that used to be in St Nicholas' Church in Cork - see picture. Can you tell me what the qualifications are to be included and who is publishing this book, please?

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Hi Sean

Could you check if Pte Terrance Connelly, 7th Bn CEF kia 13/6/16 is included in the book? He was born in Cork city with nok living at 7 Coach Street.

Libster

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Conijoni, who is Enfield?

Regards.

Tom.

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Sounds interesting, I look forward to having a read.

My ancestors left County Cork Ireland in the 1820's for Australia, so no WW1 connection, but still a connection.

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Hi Libster,

Terrance Connelly is included and this is a bit more information on him, “Husband of Mary Connelly of 7 Broad Street, Grattan Street, Cork City”

Johnney,

Herbert Hassell; Thomas Wagner and William Pulvertaft were on the first list of names, I will refer the others to Gerry to double check the other two.

Herbert Doyle was born in England but was living at 64 High Street in 1911, so he could have been added before the book went to printers.

Charles Harkness was born in Tipperary and in 1911 was a boarder at 1 White Street Cork again these names would have been checked and if the connection with relatives in Cork was confirmed they would have been added.

The nature of this search is that new information is being discovered on a continual basis.

Even though the book is gone to the printers, provision is being made to add any new names to the list in the future, so any member who finds a name with a Cork connection the project team will be very grateful if they would pass them on to us.

Regards Sean.

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Johnny,

Herbert Hassell; Thomas Wagner and William Pulvertaft were on the first list of names, I will refer the others to Gerry to double check the other two.

Herbert Doyle was born in England but was living at 64 High Street in 1911, so he could have been added before the book went to printers.

Charles Harkness was born in Tipperary and in 1911 was a boarder at 1 White Street Cork again these names would have been checked and if the connection with relatives in Cork was confirmed they would have been added.

The nature of this search is that new information is being discovered on a continual basis.

Even though the book is gone to the printers, provision is being made to add any new names to the list in the future, so any member who finds a name with a Cork connection the project team will be very grateful if they would pass them on to us.

Regards Sean.

Sean, I very much appreciate your response and am pleased that you seem to have the information.

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Hi Sean

Could you check if Pte Terrance Connelly, 7th Bn CEF kia 13/6/16 is included in the book? He was born in Cork city with nok living at 7 Coach Street.

Libster

He is indeed Libster - Husband of Mary Connelly of 7 Broad Lane, Grattan Street, Cork.

In all we have a total of 3,784 names listed in the book - including some who are not currently commemmorated by the CWGC.

A project such as this always runs the risk of unintentionally omitting a name, however, as Sean has stated in an another post - if, despite all our efforts, a name was not recorded and it is brought to our attention, it will be listed on an Addenda sheet that will be published by the Evening Echo at the end of each year.

There are plans to launch the book at a ceremony in Cork City Hall on 1st June - admission will be by ticket only if anyone on the Forum would like to attend they can send me thoer details by PM.

Gerry

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Conijoni, who is Enfield?

Regards.

Tom.

Hmmm I wonder does the name Tom give it away? :rolleyes:

Brendan

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Hmmm I wonder does the name Tom give it away? :rolleyes:

Brendan

Am with you now Arnhem44 and museumtom/enfield. Very good! Am a bit slow sometimes. Johnny Conn

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Hi again Murrough,

In relation to your query about Cornelius Peter Foley, 4255 2nd Bt RMF, the only information that we have on him is that he enlisted here in Cork but we could find no conclusive information as to his residing here and because of that he was not put on the Cork list. If as Gerry stated any new information turns up for him he will be added at a later stage.

Regards,

Sean

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Dang, my alias is out of the bag.

Tim

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My grandmother, Mary Harrington, (good old West Cork name there) apparently met her future husband, William Bradley, in Cork. He was in the Loyal North Lancashire Regt. and had served in the Boer War where he was wounded. He was born and bred in Blackburn, Lancs but his mother was origially from Ireland. It is said that Mary followed William to England. They eventually married in Glouthane, Cork, in 1910. My father was born in Aldershot/ Andover Hampshire in 1911.

What would William have been doing in Cork?

Could Mary have been a nurse?

Does your book have any reference to nursing staff ?

How could Mary have met a British soldier in between the wars when he came from England?

Did they use soldiers to assist in recruiting in Ireland?

Thank you,

Mary

I am very pleased to read about the book reminding everyone of the great price paid by so many Irish for the British!!!

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Gerry/Sean

It has just struck me...the WW1 flying ace Edward 'Mick' Mannock VC had connections with Cork. I know there are some details about his life that his biographers are uncertain about. Was just wondering if he is included in your book?

Johnny Conn

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Gerry/Sean

It has just struck me...the WW1 flying ace Edward 'Mick' Mannock VC had connections with Cork. I know there are some details about his life that his biographers are uncertain about. Was just wondering if he is included in your book?

Johnny Conn

Hi Jonny,

'Mick' is indeed listed in the book. His flying certificate records his place of birth as 'Cork' there is a genuine belief that he was born in the village of Ballincollig.

Gerry

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My grandmother, Mary Harrington, (good old West Cork name there) apparently met her future husband, William Bradley, in Cork. He was in the Loyal North Lancashire Regt. and had served in the Boer War where he was wounded. He was born and bred in Blackburn, Lancs but his mother was origially from Ireland. It is said that Mary followed William to England. They eventually married in Glouthane, Cork, in 1910. My father was born in Aldershot/ Andover Hampshire in 1911.

What would William have been doing in Cork?

Could Mary have been a nurse?

Does your book have any reference to nursing staff ?

How could Mary have met a British soldier in between the wars when he came from England?

Did they use soldiers to assist in recruiting in Ireland?

Thank you,

Mary

I am very pleased to read about the book reminding everyone of the great price paid by so many Irish for the British!!!

Hello Mary,

I think it is distinctly possible that your grandmother met your father if he was stationed in one of the military barracks that were situated in Co. Cork i.e Victoria Barracks in Cork City or the other barracks in Fermoy, Buttevant, Ballincollig, Kinsale, or even one of the harbour forts.

British soldiers from English, Scots and Welsh regiments were stationed in Ireland throughout the 18th century and right up to 1922.

It might be worth checking the history of what is now the Loyal Regiment (North Lancashire) to see if any of its units were once based in Cork.

Gerry

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  • 2 weeks later...

Well done Gerry,

I only found out last week that my Uncle Tim O'Leary from Togher had spoken to your researcher (or yourself) so I'm glad that my my relatives Denis and Andrew Condon will have another outlet to be remembered. I received a ticket from Gene in the post so I am looking forward to networking with some like minded researchers and congratulating you in person. Looking forward to the book.

Thanks for your hard work.

Tim.

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Congratulations on publication Gerry - my own Anglesey project has some way to go yet...

...speaking of which, in case you haven't got him listed there is one Cork-born casualty with an Anglesey connection as follows:

McGRATH, JOHN - born Douglas, Cork, 20 January 1870. A labourer prior to entry into the Royal Navy as 165755 Stoker 2nd Class (Devonport) on 21 January 1892. Served in a variety of ships and naval establishments, rising to Stoker Petty Officer. He was pensioned on 31 March 1914 and next day joined the Royal Fleet Reserve (no. Dev. A 4148).

Recalled on the outbreak of War, on 2 August 1914 he came under the base HMS VIVID II, going onto the cruiser HMS AURORA on 5 September following. He was probably aboard during the Battle of the Dogger Bank on 25 January 1915. On 28 March for some unknown reason he reverted to Leading Stoker, and left the vessel on 8 April. Back under HMS VIVID II, he was eventually transferred under the HMS PRESIDENT base for RN Coastguard service on 18 February 1916, rated as a Leading Stoker (Pensioner) and posted to the Western Amlwch (northern Anglesey) station.

On 20 April following he died aged 46, presumably by accident; according to his service record he "Fell over an embankment". He is buried in a war grave in Llaneilian parish churchyard just east of Amlwch, a picture of whch I can send if wanted. There is no family or other information on the CWGC register, or any personal epitaph on the Welsh slate headstone.

All the best with your publication.

LST_164

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just thought I'd bring this thread back up as a reminder that the launch of the Cork book is this evening in City Hall(Tuesday 1/6/2010),well done lads on the publication.

Brendan

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Thanks for that Brendan,

Just on that subject, we saw the book for the first time last evening and for my own part I just want to say that I am very proud to have been part of it. The launch as you say is this evening at 7.50 City Hall, for any one who may be able to attend invitations are still available at the offices of the Evening Echo in The City Quarter or at Liam Russell’s Book Store, Oliver Plunkett Street Cork. The book is in Hard Back and the cost will be €39.99 in the shops but will be on sale this evening during the ceremony for €30.00.

On Behalf of all the project team I would like to thank all the forum members for their help and support in this very worthwhile project.

Hi LST_164.

our apologies for not replying to your post on John McGrath until now, John is not in the book at this stage as we could find no connection for him to Cork at that time, however he along with any further names that turn up in the coming months his name will be added.

Sincere thanks to you all again.

Regards,

Sean

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I would just like to personally convey my thanks to everyone who has brought out this excellent book and to everyone else that made it happen,I wish you all the best on any future publications.Great event last night and ye have done Cork proud.

Brendan

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Thanks Brendan for your kind words and I am sorry we did not meet up last evening, I am delighted that you enjoyed the ceremony.

I would like to take this opportunity to apologise to some of the forum members for the omission of their names in the Acknowledgements section of the book, this occurred because some database were not submitted on time, they will however be included in the next print of the book which could be in the next few months. A book of this kind is only successful because of the input of individuals and the forum members have been invaluable in this respect.

Thank you all again for your help and support.

Regards,

Sean

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  • 2 weeks later...

Just got my copy of the book, and I am deeply impressed. It is a remarkable piece of work and enormous credit is due to the authors and contributors. The various essays on aspects of the Great War are fascinating, the detail on the servicemen is painstaking, and the photos, newspaper clippings, posters, drawings etc are wonderful. As well as that, the production quality of the book is very high-should withstand many years of perusal!

Sean, the people of Cork and Ireland owe you and your colleagues a great debt.

Well done.

Cathal.

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