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chaz

visiting after Brexit

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keithfazzani

But it would, if travelling to Europe after March 29th to get one anyway, and sooner rather than later.  I agree it only may be needed, but better safe than sorry. As I said there are far more concerning issues, EHIC cards amongst them. For those of us of more “mature” years and with pre existing health conditions of one sort or another, I suspect the cost of health insurance may preclude popping over for a couple of days. At the moment travel insurance to Europe is relatively inexpensive, but that assumes that the person concerned is covered by an EHIC card. If these disappear then the insurance will be similar to travelling outside Europe, which for some people will I suspect make visiting Europe prohibitive, I hope not. I spoke with an insurance broker about it the other day and I understand the Insurance companies are also concerned about the cost of travel disruption and whether current policies cover such eventualities. 

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trajan
On 14/01/2019 at 15:07, sassenach said:

It's a bilateral agreement between the UK and the US; nothing to do with the EU. And the FCO website confirms that travel from the UK to non-EU countries will not be affected.

 

And we do have a couple of major WW1 battlefields here in Turkey - one in the sunny west and a few more in the mountainous east - as well as a railway line built in many places by British and other POW's...

 

My gripe is that there are no direct flights Ankara-UK and so I always flew Lufthansa Ankara-Munich-UK to avoid either of the two Istanbul airports... I honestly don't want to have to go THY via Istanbul if nothing is sorted out... 

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sassenach
17 minutes ago, keithfazzani said:

But it would, if travelling to Europe after March 29th to get one anyway, and sooner rather than later.  I agree it only may be needed, but better safe than sorry. As I said there are far more concerning issues, EHIC cards amongst them. For those of us of more “mature” years and with pre existing health conditions of one sort or another, I suspect the cost of health insurance may preclude popping over for a couple of days. At the moment travel insurance to Europe is relatively inexpensive, but that assumes that the person concerned is covered by an EHIC card. If these disappear then the insurance will be similar to travelling outside Europe, which for some people will I suspect make visiting Europe prohibitive, I hope not. I spoke with an insurance broker about it the other day and I understand the Insurance companies are also concerned about the cost of travel disruption and whether current policies cover such eventualities. 

Well, insurance companies are past masters at finding reasons to refuse claims, and I don't doubt that they will rise to the occasion in these circumstances.

I know that travel insurance can be prohibitively expensive, but there is a risk in relying on the EHIC alone. It will not cover you for something like an emergency repatriation, for example.  

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Martin Bennitt

If you have the right credit card you should be covered for a number of things.

 

Martin B

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Dragon

There is always the option of opening a current account which includes travel insurance. And should you wish to buy your own, an annual policy is almost invariably cheaper.

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keithfazzani

These bank account insurances often cease at age 70 and most exclude pre existing conditions. Yes I agree that one should not rely on EHIC alone, and I never do. My point is simply that travel insurance for Europe is cheap mainly because basic medical costs are covered by the EHIC card and the price reflects this, if the EHIC card ceases then the cost will rise.

 

Incidentally the papers are full of stories of people whose travel insurance does not cover them because they have not declared pre existing conditions and these can be as minor as taking statins or blood pressure medication.  My bank acount  includes travel insurance but you have to declare pre exisitng conditions (very small print) and ceases at age 70.

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Don Regiano

My stand-alone annual travel insurance cover costs just over £70 for my wife and I.  It is the standard policy.  It is available until age 80 i.e. at the next renewal date (I've a few years to go before then - if I stick around).  My wife has a pre-existing condition which is covered with no additional premium.  I suppose I could spend a lot of time trying to get something cheaper but I don't think any saving would be worth the effort and comparing the levels of cover offered.

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chaz

My policy is with a specialised sickness company, £100 a year takes into account I had cancer and the wife is covered on same policy . Might just have to check for updates but no notification sent yet and runs until August 

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healdav
18 hours ago, Martin Bennitt said:

This always amuses/puzzles me. In France your insurance certificate is a Green Card and you get it automatically when you renew the contract. I fail to see why British insurers can't do the same thing. I'm more concerned annoyed  pissed off furious (among lots of other things about this total foutoir) that my EHIC will no longer be valid when I come to the UK and I will have to pay for health insurance.

 

Cheers Martin B

I quite agree about the Green Card, it never fails to amuse me when I get a Green Card every year automatically, and it's valid right across to the Iraq border, and the British have to pay for one that lasts six weeks or something. Especially when the fact is that under EU law your Third Party insurance is valid right across the EU, automatically. The Green Card basically means that anyone looking at it is looking at a standard form (as driving licence), and doesn't have to work out whether something is your name or where you were born.

Health insurance. Mora than a nuisance, but a least it will stop the British residents who use the EH1C to avoid paying into the local social security scheme.

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nigelcave

I have not paid for a Green Card from my UK insurers in years (and I have had two different insurers). On the other hand, I do have to ask them for one; and at the same time confirm that my cover is Comprehensive whilst 'over there'. I spend about six months a year in Europe.

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tootrock

My Insurance Certificate states on the reverse that it takes the place of the International Motor Card (Green Card) and is evidence that the insurance extends to include the compulsory motor insurance requirements of (a) any other member of the European Union, (b) Andorra, Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Switzerland. This is repeated in French, German, Italian and Spanish.

Should I feel safe or not?

 

Martin

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nigelcave

On the other hand, I find it strange that the UK does not have a green insurance tag that has to be displayed on the windscreen; mentioned above and the norm, it would appear, amongst European countries. I get a green card because I often ventures into places which are very very rural and find that it avoids all sorts of complications with the local constabulary. It also solves the problem of driving into Vatican City (although one has to admit that thee is not a lot of traffic there).

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healdav
38 minutes ago, nigelcave said:

On the other hand, I find it strange that the UK does not have a green insurance tag that has to be displayed on the windscreen; mentioned above and the norm, it would appear, amongst European countries. I get a green card because I often ventures into places which are very very rural and find that it avoids all sorts of complications with the local constabulary. It also solves the problem of driving into Vatican City (although one has to admit that thee is not a lot of traffic there).

Certainly an insurance tag on the windscreen is the law in France, but elsewhere? I've not seen it, and I don't know any countries that require it (for residents).

Of course, French motorists were up in arms about it when brought in (and it has stopped uninsured drivers), but then the motorcyclists were up in arms when compulsory headlights was brought in; and up in arms when it was proposed for all vehicles!

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mva
18 minutes ago, healdav said:

(and it has stopped uninsured drivers

not quite : in the local newspaper there still are (rather often) articles about people having an accident and not being insured!

I am not ,sure at all that in villages or small towns police/gendarmerie check if the little green thing is there & up to date !!!!

 

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sassenach
1 hour ago, healdav said:

Certainly an insurance tag on the windscreen is the law in France, but elsewhere? I've not seen it, and I don't know any countries that require it (for residents).

Of course, French motorists were up in arms about it when brought in (and it has stopped uninsured drivers), but then the motorcyclists were up in arms when compulsory headlights was brought in; and up in arms when it was proposed for all vehicles!

Isn't being up in arms about something just part of being French? 

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mva
1 minute ago, sassenach said:

Isn't being up in arms about something just part of being French? 

well, well ..... who were the first to kill their king .... ??????

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sassenach

The ancient Egyptians, perhaps.

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Dragon
17 hours ago, keithfazzani said:

These bank account insurances often cease at age 70 and most exclude pre existing conditions. Yes I agree that one should not rely on EHIC alone, and I never do. My point is simply that travel insurance for Europe is cheap mainly because basic medical costs are covered by the EHIC card and the price reflects this, if the EHIC card ceases then the cost will rise.

 

Incidentally the papers are full of stories of people whose travel insurance does not cover them because they have not declared pre existing conditions and these can be as minor as taking statins or blood pressure medication.  My bank acount  includes travel insurance but you have to declare pre exisitng conditions (very small print) and ceases at age 70.

 

I'm not advising people to do it; it's just an option.

 

The travel insurance with my bank account covers people up to the age of 80. Mine covers both of us. I have several pre-existing conditions and have scrupulously declared all which I am required to (the policy document lists some conditions which you don't need to declare, including ones which you haven't seen a doctor about for x years). I've only had to pay a small extra amount once, to cover a recent illness. The insurer has given me a document listing the conditions which I've declared and a statement that they are all fully covered.

 

As with every contract, we have to scrutinise our policy.

 

 

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Martin Bennitt

There are some comments verging on taking sides politically. Everyone may agree it's a total shambles but avoid pointing the finger of blame at anyone :P

 

Thanks and cheers Martin B

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EAST YORKSHIRE

Whilst I can empathize with people who are concerned with health insurance, pets etc, nothing is really clear on a lot of matters on other areas yet to be decided. the more I read this thread-the more I am becoming a Brexitprepper - now wheres them ocean sticks................................

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nigelcave
On 18/01/2019 at 11:02, healdav said:

Certainly an insurance tag on the windscreen is the law in France, but elsewhere? I've not seen it, and I don't know any countries that require it (for residents).

Of course, French motorists were up in arms about it when brought in (and it has stopped uninsured drivers), but then the motorcyclists were up in arms when compulsory headlights was brought in; and up in arms when it was proposed for all vehicles!

 

It is in Italy as well (and San Marino and the Vatican, so far as I know).

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Ken Lees

My car insurance company have a recorded message on their auto-answering service which says in the event of a no-deal exit from the EU, green cards will be issued and policy holders should ask for them three weeks prior to departure. 

 

However, all this is speculation. Will we? Won't we? 

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Maureene

Came across this while looking at something else

 

Official government advice:

"Going and being abroad – EU Exit guidance"

https://www.gov.uk/prepare-eu-exit/going-and-being-abroad

 

"Living in France

Official information British people moving to and living in France need to know, including EU Exit guidance, residency, healthcare and driving".

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/living-in-france

 

Cheers

Maureen

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Dragon

I suggest people have a look at this article and this page: Schengen Tourist Visa.  

 

Gwyn

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healdav
On 18/01/2019 at 09:53, tootrock said:

My Insurance Certificate states on the reverse that it takes the place of the International Motor Card (Green Card) and is evidence that the insurance extends to include the compulsory motor insurance requirements of (a) any other member of the European Union, (b) Andorra, Iceland, Norway, Croatia, Serbia and Switzerland. This is repeated in French, German, Italian and Spanish.

Should I feel safe or not?

 

Martin

You're OK.

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