Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Sign in to follow this  
chaz

visiting after Brexit

Recommended Posts

sassenach

Doesn't it all depend on whether "the deal" is agreed? If it is, won't it be business as usual? If there is no deal, the FCO website advises observing the "six months left on passport" rule. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yperman
On 03/01/2019 at 07:46, Heid the Ba said:

Airports in Scotland.

I suggest you check the "Brexit" clause in the fine print on your airline tickets  - some are starting to say  no deal, no fly, no compensation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mva
6 hours ago, healdav said:

The French couldn't care less how many dogs you take in and out of the country. It's the British who have this bizarre obsession with rabies and foreign ticks.

 

It is always nice to have a chat with a dog (& owners) when meeting British people here in the Somme !

and I do hope that terrible system of quarantine won't be started again for continental dogs !

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
harley1962

I live in the North and have travelled Hull to Zeebrugge in the past, but the vast difference in price and the overnight on the ferry put me off, so i have for the past few years drove down to Dover spent overnight in a hotel and got the early morning ferry.

The what might happen has not put me off and i have already booked the same for a trip over on 13th April with a return on Good Friday so will see if as bad as all the speculation.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
healdav
On 06/01/2019 at 18:30, nigelcave said:

Hmmm - come to think about it I recall a lot of paperwork relating to the car and that was certainly necessary going behind the Curtain, with much rubber stamping. I think we went out in a Ford Consul Classic (?) which was sold, IIRC, to the Bulgarian Defence Attache. One of the requirements was that my father was asked to sell the car for 'x' and the spare parts, which consisted of a small bag of basics, for 'y', where 'y' was about 25% of the value of 'x'. Presumably this helped with the importing of our old car into Bulgaria.

Until about 1959/60 when you took a car out of any country in 'Europe', you had to have a triptyque i.e. a big book, where the car was stamped out of country 1 on the stub of a three part page (hence triptyque), also on the right hand tear off slip. Then on entering country 2 they stamped again on the stub, and then on right hand slip, which they then tore of and did heaven knows what with. Then a stamp on tear off strip 2, and onwards. On leaving country 2, they stamped to show you were leaving, and tore out the strip. Country 3 (which might be country 1 again), stamped the stub, and then the last tear off strip on that page. Then country 4, and so on. Queues could be hours long with everyone having to get this rigmarole done. For what purpose was never known by anyone I knew. I can even remember my father having to chase a Customs guard across a mountain when leaving Spain (he was a 12 year old or so goatherd!), because he wouldn't be able to enter France without leaving Spain.

Brings tears to my eyes to think of how easy travel was in those days.

Oh, and you couldn't take nasty foreign plants into Britain either - not even a bunch of flowers, and some numpty jobsworth in Southampton when we eventually went to live in Britain, wanting me to pay sixpence import tax on the small camera I had bought out of my pocket money (I was 11). Needless to say I didn't have any money so he gave up the attempt; grudgingly.

Those were the days.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
bazunitec
On 10/01/2019 at 14:26, healdav said:

Until about 1959/60 when you took a car out of any country in 'Europe', you had to have a triptyque i.e. a big book, where the car was stamped out of country 1 on the stub of a three part page (hence triptyque), also on the right hand tear off slip. Then on entering country 2 they stamped again on the stub, and then on right hand slip, which they then tore of and did heaven knows what with. Then a stamp on tear off strip 2, and onwards. On leaving country 2, they stamped to show you were leaving, and tore out the strip. Country 3 (which might be country 1 again), stamped the stub, and then the last tear off strip on that page. Then country 4, and so on. Queues could be hours long with everyone having to get this rigmarole done. For what purpose was never known by anyone I knew. I can even remember my father having to chase a Customs guard across a mountain when leaving Spain (he was a 12 year old or so goatherd!), because he wouldn't be able to enter France without leaving Spain.

Brings tears to my eyes to think of how easy travel was in those days.

Oh, and you couldn't take nasty foreign plants into Britain either - not even a bunch of flowers, and some numpty jobsworth in Southampton when we eventually went to live in Britain, wanting me to pay sixpence import tax on the small camera I had bought out of my pocket money (I was 11). Needless to say I didn't have any money so he gave up the attempt; grudgingly.

Those were the days.

 

Reminds me of when we were holidaying in the South of France in about 2000 in my brand new, top of the range Rover 75. We did a day trip into Andorra, had a great day sightseeing and then coming back we were stopped at the border back into France.... Things didn't look good to start with as there was a British Vauxhall Astra which was in the process of being dismantled from the inside out... door panels, seats, carpets... the lot!

 

This rather official looking woman came to my car and started asking about the cameras, lenses and other stuff we had in the boot (all bought in England, but I obviously didn't have the receipts with me.... she started going on about how I had to pay duty and then asked me for my ID and license. At the time, I was running a project to install a new computer network for Lothian & Borders Police and when we started the job, they had no contractors passes to allow me and my staff to access the various police stations and so they gave me a Lothian Staff Pass, complete with holograms and all sorts of official looking crests and writing... I gave it to the lady along with my passport.... she looked at me and said "You Police"?... I nodded sheepishly.... "OK...You go now".... we passed the Astra just as the young couple had started to watch the customs chaps removing the bonnet (I kid you not) from their car.... :)

On 07/01/2019 at 11:59, harley1962 said:

I live in the North and have travelled Hull to Zeebrugge in the past, but the vast difference in price and the overnight on the ferry put me off, so i have for the past few years drove down to Dover spent overnight in a hotel and got the early morning ferry.

The what might happen has not put me off and i have already booked the same for a trip over on 13th April with a return on Good Friday so will see if as bad as all the speculation.

We did Dover for many years but by the time you take into account the time it takes to get there from Warrington, the fuel costs, then a hotel and meals, it works out about the same if not only a little more to go Hull-Zeebrugge... plus its like having an extra nights holiday at the start and the end... and only 2 hours driving to the port!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yperman
2 hours ago, bazunitec said:

 like having an extra nights holiday at the start and the end..

Only one? You may find Zeebrugge a trifle busy with other ships and paper work and stuff... while your ship queues and queues and...

 

On 10/01/2019 at 14:26, healdav said:

 

Those were the days.

 

They were - I remember them - ah the good old  £25 limit on cash you could take out of  the country in any one year and the stamps on your passport and the helpful, polite  French customs and immigration, it makes me all nostalgic - just like a Hovis advert.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Phil Wood

We are planning this year's spring break to the US rather than France (catching a few Revolutionary War sites) - but I now start wondering what the arrangements are for travel in that direction?  Do we travel under an EU/US treaty, in the event of a no deal Brexit will there be a few hiccups in that direction too?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
healdav
On 12/01/2019 at 15:56, bazunitec said:

Things didn't look good to start with as there was a British Vauxhall Astra which was in the process of being dismantled from the inside out... door panels, seats, carpets... the lot!

 

we passed the Astra just as the young couple had started to watch the customs chaps removing the bonnet (I kid you not) from their car.... :)

 

I was once stuck on a Calais Dover ferry with about 10 people on board, and quite late at night. I fell into conversation with an (empty) coach driver. He told e that not long before he had been stopped by the Customs at Dover, and the had cause £1000 damage 'examining' the coach (and found nothing). When he protested, they laughed and walked away. He said he had a camera to photo everything they did (I'll bet they would be unhappy), so that they could be sued for damage.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yperman
16 hours ago, healdav said:

 they laughed 

That I don't believe. In the 1960s the French customs and immigration may have been disdainful and unhelpful but they were definitely runners up to The Dover British Border Official. With the example of British Rail staff at Dover Marine before them they would never have laughed or indeed been interested. If they did a thousand quid's worth of damage to that coach they  must have had at least three tea breaks. And a fag break. Curiously at Zeebrugge and Ostend the officials were always polite and efficient and I don't remember ever having any difficulties there. Most odd.

 

This summer I have a cunning plan  - I  have booked to fly Lufthansa to Munich, then to Koln, than I will sneak into Belgium via Aachen by train. A sort of 'race to the sea'. Do you think it will work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sassenach
24 minutes ago, yperman said:

Do you think it will work?

Given that a previous post expresses concern about being able to fly to America after The Big Day, I'd say almost certainly not.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Open Bolt
1 hour ago, yperman said:

Munich, then to Koln, than I will sneak into Belgium via Aachen

Ah yes, a route favoured by escapees including those from Holzminden, but if the train does not work, beware the 1915 electric fence.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
mva
2 hours ago, yperman said:

This summer I have a cunning plan  - I  have booked to fly Lufthansa to Munich, then to Koln, than I will sneak into Belgium via Aachen by train. A sort of 'race to the sea'. Do you think it will work?

just wondering : why fly to Munich .... and then to Köln ? There is an airport Köln/Bonn ! And : apart the fact that flying is not good for the planet, I would advise to take the train : you see much more of the country ... and your train will take you to Köln along the Rhine ....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sassenach
On 13/01/2019 at 00:48, Phil Wood said:

Do we travel under an EU/US treaty, in the event of a no deal Brexit will there be a few hiccups in that direction too?

It's a bilateral agreement between the UK and the US; nothing to do with the EU. And the FCO website confirms that travel from the UK to non-EU countries will not be affected.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yperman
1 hour ago, mva said:

I would advise to take the train

I agree train is the best  way to see France and  Germany, but I wanted to avoid if possible Brexit hassles at Dover/Ashford. You can fly direct Stansted to  Koln  but I don't like Stansted's parking and it is awkward for me to get there. Lufthansa flies from (for me) the much nearer Heathrow but only to Munich, where you pick up the internal flight to Koln. We are going to spend a week in Koln - taking the inevitable selfie of us standing where Plumer took the salute as the British army crossed the Rhine - before going to Aachen and Belgium. Or maybe not if Brexit really causes chaos. In which case we have the yellow vests in the back of the car and a short run to London...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
CorporalPunishment
21 hours ago, healdav said:

I was once stuck on a Calais Dover ferry with about 10 people on board, and quite late at night. I fell into conversation with an (empty) coach driver. He told e that not long before he had been stopped by the Customs at Dover, and the had cause £1000 damage 'examining' the coach (and found nothing). When he protested, they laughed and walked away. He said he had a camera to photo everything they did (I'll bet they would be unhappy), so that they could be sued for damage.

I have been reading your posts on this thread and would like to ask you one question. If you ever think of anything good to say about the British would you be so kind as to tell us what it is please?. Pete.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
healdav
On 14/01/2019 at 10:23, yperman said:

 

 

This summer I have a cunning plan  - I  have booked to fly Lufthansa to Munich, then to Koln, than I will sneak into Belgium via Aachen by train. A sort of 'race to the sea'. Do you think it will work?

Should do. Munich is fairly quiet, so you will get through quickly. There are flights and also trains to Koln.

Incidentally, I'm not sure whether you can get them in Britain or whether you will have to buy one at the station on Munich, but the Germans (and the French) do a travel card which gives you pretty much half price travel during its validity. It's so generous that it pretty much pays for itself if you use it twice. Of course, each person needs one.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
yperman
1 hour ago, healdav said:

a travel card which gives you pretty much half price travel during its validity. It's so generous that it pretty much pays for itself if you use it twice. Of course, each person needs one.

Thanks - I do use these and as you rightly say they are a really good deal.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
David26
On 14/01/2019 at 13:35, yperman said:

I agree train is the best  way to see France and  Germany, but I wanted to avoid if possible Brexit hassles at Dover/Ashford. You can fly direct Stansted to  Koln  but I don't like Stansted's parking and it is awkward for me to get there. Lufthansa flies from (for me) the much nearer Heathrow but only to Munich, where you pick up the internal flight to Koln. We are going to spend a week in Koln - taking the inevitable selfie of us standing where Plumer took the salute as the British army crossed the Rhine - before going to Aachen and Belgium. Or maybe not if Brexit really causes chaos. In which case we have the yellow vests in the back of the car and a short run to London...

Had you considered flying to Duesseldorf?  It's close to Koeln and it's a lovely little airport - the bag was on the carousel before we were, and we'd whizzed straight through to the baggage hall from the aircraft.  We flew from Bristol and went with BMI.  The quickest and easiest park - check in - flight - baggage reclaim we've ever had. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
egbert
On ‎14‎/‎01‎/‎2019 at 10:23, yperman said:

This summer I have a cunning plan  - I  have booked to fly Lufthansa to Munich, then to Koln, than I will sneak into Belgium via Aachen by train. A sort of 'race to the sea'. Do you think it will work?

Flying from all 3 London airports directly to CGN (Köln/Bonn), and/or from Munich must be done with Eurowings.de or Eurowings.com

Eurowings is the low cost affiliate from Lufthansa. flights from London from 20€ and up. As I said , when flying from Munich to Köln/Bonn it is Eurowings as well. Train fares are appr. double or triple the flight price. 

On ‎14‎/‎01‎/‎2019 at 12:34, mva said:

just wondering : why fly to Munich .... and then to Köln ? There is an airport Köln/Bonn ! And : apart the fact that flying is not good for the planet, I would advise to take the train : you see much more of the country ... and your train will take you to Köln along the Rhine ....

Munich to Köln trains do not use the Rhine River route anymore. This line has been abondoned some 15 years ago, when the high speed connection was established between Munich-Frankfurt-Köln.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
RobertBr

Today on TV they are saying if its a hard Brexit that you will need a Green Card to take your car abroad and that you will need to apply at least a month before you travel.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sassenach

I think "may" rather than "will."

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
keithfazzani

Not so sure about that. I can see no reason at all why we won’t be required to have a green card after we leave the EU. They were the norm not so long ago and are easy to get in normal circumstances. I imagjne that the 30 days is because a lot of people will require them and the insurance companies will need to gear up. I suspect that the green card issue may be the least of our worries. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Martin Bennitt

This always amuses/puzzles me. In France your insurance certificate is a Green Card and you get it automatically when you renew the contract. I fail to see why British insurers can't do the same thing. I'm more concerned annoyed  pissed off furious (among lots of other things about this total foutoir) that my EHIC will no longer be valid when I come to the UK and I will have to pay for health insurance.

 

Cheers Martin B

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
sassenach
36 minutes ago, keithfazzani said:

Not so sure about that. I can see no reason at all why we won’t be required to have a green card after we leave the EU. They were the norm not so long ago and are easy to get in normal circumstances. I imagjne that the 30 days is because a lot of people will require them and the insurance companies will need to gear up. I suspect that the green card issue may be the least of our worries. 

I don't know whether we will or not. But the issue is not yet decided, so "may" seems to be more appropriate than "will."

12 minutes ago, Martin Bennitt said:

This always amuses/puzzles me. In France your insurance certificate is a Green Card and you get it automatically when you renew the contract. I fail to see why British insurers can't do the same thing. I'm more concerned annoyed  pissed off furious (among lots of other things about this total foutoir) that my EHIC will no longer be valid when I come to the UK and I will have to pay for health insurance.

 

Cheers Martin B

The standard advice is that an EHIC is not a substitute for travel insurance. It is prudent to have both.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...