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hmsk212

Who or What is your Avatar

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Hans Molier

Mine is offcourse the front and backside of the British Victoria Cross.

VC3.jpg

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Landsturm

Just had this changed before I noticed the topic. My avatar is Finland coat-of-arms. Although I`m very VERY interested in investigating the Great War, my own roots are more closely related to years 1939-1945.

I updated my avatar in order to honour my grandfather, light-machinegunner Tauno Koivurinne, served in Sakkola, Karelian Isthmus for the Winter War November 30th 1939 / March 13th 1940 - wounded in Simpele, Karelian Isthmus July 31st 1941 during the Continuation War of 1941-1944.

And to my respect my friend, to Terho Aleksander Saari fallen in Kollaa, Ladoga Karelia July 16th 1941.

My name Landsturm has nothing to do with my heritage, nor nationality. It`s just simple name more suitable for this forum.

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petrick

my avatar is the unofficial WW1 badge of the 13th Australian Light horse. "the dancing devil"

on the photograph three members in belgium

post-8-1095172395.jpg

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bkristof

The dancing devil is alos the symbol for druggies...

Isn't it Pat???

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petrick

sadly some motorclubs in Oz use the badge because the number 13 stands for some kind of drugs. Bloody shamefull to misuse this badge for this kind of things.

somethings are never sacred.

coo-ee

patrick

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bkristof

I knew you did more than just living history... You are an addicted Hell's Angel too! ;)

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petrick

<_< who was the guy with two bikes in his garage and has plenty off german helmets?????

not me mate :P

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Geoff Reeves

Mine is the 1914-15 trio to 2868 Pte Joseph Collins, 2/4th Battalion The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regiment). I've just finished researching his pre-war years, from his birth in September 1897 - through to his discharge in 1919. He served with the MEF at Gallipoli and in Egypt. Collins remustered as a Pioneer signaller with the RE in 1917.

I'll probably end up changing my avatar from time to time to reflect other soldiers of The Queen's whose medals are now in my collection.

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philary

Hi

My avatar is my Great Uncle Austin Sutton (details listed below) and his picture was taken on being gazetted to 2nd Lieutenant in 1917. We are the pair off to visit the area in October in the Morgan! (If you have read the thread - driving in Ypres)

Hilary

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Somme1916

9th Scottish Division Patch. The only avatar I've ever used.

Jon

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andigger

This thread hasn't popped up in a while, so I thought it would be a great opportunity to ask Soren1915 what her Avatar is. I think it looks really cool.

By the way, as an aside, since I have never met any of you, and seen pictures of only a few more, I thought I would let you know that in my mind at least I picture you just like your Avatar. :o

:P Andy

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David_Bluestein

Acting Major Charles Blair Wilson

42nd Battalion Royal Highlanders Of Canada CEF

Killed in Action September 15, 1916

letter (In part) written by thirteen men of his company to his mother:

'As NCO's of B Coy. We wish to express to you our sympathy on the death of Capt. Blair-Wilson. Knowing him as we did, it was a terrible blow to us all, and we realize how much more so it would be to his family. While lamenting your great loss, we hope in these few lines convey to you something of the spirit and admiration with which the conduct of our youthful Captain imbued to all those who were with him before he fell. It is no exaggeration to say that the pages of British history or the canvas of our most eminent artists never portrayed an incident more worthy of record than the gallant way in which your son led his men to the charge. It seems almost incredible that, with shells of all calibres bursting around and rifle and machine gun bullets whistling like a hailstorm, a man could lead his boys with nothing in his hand but a walking cane. Nevertheless that is exactly what happened, and the influence of such splendid courage could not fail to inspire his men with confidence and cause them to set their minds only upon the object of attack. The effect was marvelous. Each time the Captain gave an order to advance, he signaled the command by first climbing the parapet or shell hole, where we had all taken temporary cover, and waving his cane and shouting, "Come along boys". Not a man wavered and no soldier can ever wish to see a more beautiful sight than the coolness displayed during the steady advance over 700 yards of shell racked and bullet torn ground which lay between us an the enemy's trench. Men were killed and wounded but it did not stem the tide, and with a feeling of pride we reached our objective. It was a trying ordeal, but we felt that the result was worth the strain. Captain Wilson was delighted and wore the flush of victory, but alas! Even in the moment of triumph he was stricken down by machine gun fire. We have spoken to many of the boys in the company, and they all express great admiration for their company commander; In fact one of them said, "It was glorious, and that he would have followed the Captain to Berlin if possible." We feel we cannot pay too glowing a tribute to your son's gallantry and we hope the knowledge of the way he died will, in some measure compensate you for your loss so great. Capt. Blair-Wilson died a soldier and a man. A hero of the Somme is no flattery.' (De Ruvigny's Roll Of Honour)

post-8-1102045248.jpg

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chrisharley9

John William Bettles, My Great Uncle

All The Best

Chris

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J T Gray

I'm afraid I'm another unimaginative one who uses his grandad's photo (and name!). We haven't got a lot of other WW1 photos.

Sadly his service records went up in smoke, and he died before I was born, but I've got copies of some of his postcards and Dad can remember what little he said about the war.

So it is probable that grandad, a carpenter's son from Essex, was there when the first signs that the deadlock could be broken were seen at Cambrai, and was there when Ludendorf broke the deadlock on March 21st. He spent the rest of the war in a POW camp.

IN MEMORIAN

Pte 35801 James Thurgood Gray

11th Battalion Essex Regiment.

Lance Corporal (reluctant!) James Thurgood Gray

11th Battalion Essex Home Guard

1896 - 1969

Adrian

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markinbelfast

mine's the building where I used to work...my very first job...a place where I was bullied, hassled, harassed and generally had my life made a lving hell! If I only knew what I know now back then! This is the building being leveled... it gave me a great feeling deep in my stompic! :D

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steve fuller

Me in the morning... or dressed up to go out to a swanky resteraunt- take your pick really :P

Or (more boringly praps) a pic a mate sent me ages ago that made me laugh so much for so long I had to share it with the world. Its still set as the wallpaper on my PC & brings a smile to my face when I see it; still makes me chuckle how narked the puss-tat looks :lol: . Seems to have worked on others too from the pm's Ive had since being on forum anyway!

Anything to make the day go by with a smirk ...

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Matt Dixon

The Newfoundland Memorial at Beaumont Hamel

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bcerha

Mine is a early WW1 recruiting poster. I really love it because to me it really captures the movement of a cavalryman, sword drawn at full tilt at the charge on the back of a good old steady cavalry troop horse (not unlike those used by the LG and RHG/D today in London).

This must have been the view that some of the Germans in the Sugar Factory at Audriengies must have had on 24th Aug 1914 when the 9th Lancers and the 4th Dragoon Guards made their dash down the line of the Chausee de Brunhault that day. One of my favourite actions (if you could see or have seen the field and sunken road they charged over you'll know why) for its sheer guts and horsemanship. My WW1 interests as listed in my profile will give you a better idea of why I am so keen on this. Hope you like it.

:D

Regards

David

PS I've just looked at it in Avtar size and it really doesn't do it justice. I will scan a postcard sized copy in so that you can see what I really mean.

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BatterySergeantMajor

Mine is the "Heldenhulde"- cross (freely translated "tribute to the heroes"), which was placed on the graves of Great War-soldiers who supported the cause of giving equal rights to the Flemish majority in Belgium. Often the headstone was payed by their comrades.

These soldiers wanted to be commanded in their own language (Dutch or Flemish) in stead of in French, and asked that "Home Rule" should be granted to the Flemish people after the war, as a recognition for the war efforts of the Flemish. A lot of them where punished for their peaceful actions. Even more shameful, many of these crosses where demolished after the war by Belgian government and used to pave a road.

It was designed by the Flemish soldier and artist Joe English, son of an Irish father and a Belgian mother. The AVV-VVK means "everything for Flanders, Flanders for Christ", and, even if I'm not religious, I do not adapt it because of it's emotional and historical value.

My avatar is my personal tribute to these brave people who tried to combine loyalty to Belgium with their pride to be Flemish. Up to today they are misused by extreme politicians who want to claim their heritage.

Erwin

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CROONAERT

Mine's the latest (and last?) variant of the capbadge of my old regiment, the QLR which (through amalgamations) has more battle honours than any other British Regiment ( that doesn't cheat and use "Ubique" ;) ). I had been using my own capbadge ( a pretty rare brass version) but in the present climate of change where it looks like "my lot" are going to disappear again (yes, it's not just the Black Watch - and the QLR are on readiness for Iraq early next year. What going on - The government trying to wipe out both regiments before they have to disband? <_< ), I thought it best to use the current version which has only been out a year or so.

Previous avatars have been the brass "war economy" version of the East Lancs badge and the "Hussard de Mort" insignia of Charles Nungesser (which someone mistook as a sick Valentines Day message!!!)

Dave.

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Canadawwi

My avatar is the one of the last known pictures of my great uncle, Pte. G. M. Pirie, who died of wounds received at Ypres during the counterattack of the 1st and 4th Battalions CEF at Ypres on April 23, 1915. When I first saw this photo, it was one of only a few scraps of paper that were left to remember him by.

This picture was taken during what was a happy time - he is posed among his friends at Valcartier training camp in Quebec. The photo is from September 1914.

They left their hometown of Dundas, Ontario on August 20th, 1914 - "Wentworth's Heroes to Leave today - Overseas Contingent Will Leave by the G.T.R. at 10:10 a.m. - "The Dundas people are sure to be all out to give the boys a hearty send off on their way to fight for the honour of their country. In the 77th Contingent there are 74 men who have passed the medical examination, which was a very strict one..." (The Dundas Star, August 20th, 1914).

At the same time, this advertisement appeared in the newspaper - "Volunteer Photos. That keep in your memory the faces of the boys who have volunteered their services in aid of the Mother County in the great European struggle now going on in northern France. The prices are Moderate. Forsythe, Photographer."

A last official portrait of my dear great uncle in his uniform was never taken - perhaps the fact that both his parents had died when he was a little boy left no one to push him to have such a picture taken.

The picture shows from left to right: Lance-Corp. Leonard H. Bertram (Military Cross), Unknown, Pte. Arthur E. Turner, and Pte. Goldwin McCausland Pirie.

From Valcartier camp he wrote several cheerful letters and sent them directly to the Dundas newspaper for publication as they were a humorous report on the experiences of the local men at Valcartier. Proud of his home town he wrote that Sam Hughes remarked after a review - "Dundas boys, eh! Fine body of men." He later joked, when the Dundas boys received clothing that was too large - "We think our Quartermaster must have heard Col. Hughes remark last week about the 77th being a fine body of men, as we are snugly outfitted with 8 dozen shirts, neck size 18 1/2 in. and underwear size 44."

The last letter from Canada was dated September 21st, 1914, a letter he wrote to the local newspaper on behalf of a group of the Dundas men - "To the Editor - Dear Sir: - As the time for our departure draws near and the camp is in a state of disorder, we do not think it best to send in the rather breezy letter we had written for this number. We had a muster parade this afternoon in full marching order, as all equipment is now issued, so will bid farewell to our friends in dear old Dundas. Always hoping to see you whenever Dame Fortune sees fit, we are sincerely yours - Bertram, Gwyn, Sullivan, Cowper, Knill, Turner, Gaines, Lavender, Graham and Pirie."

Three men never came home.

Remembering,

Corp. William Henry Gaines, killed in action June 15th, 1915.

Capt. Charles Campbell Gwyn, killed in action April 9th, 1917.

Pte. Goldwin M. Pirie, died of wounds July 1st, 1915.

post-8-1102123208.jpg

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Half-pint

That's me with Grandad, c1956. (Almost) needless to say, he called us "half-pints", "ankle-biters", or "wind-bags". Favourite purveyor of Smarties ;-). Grandma hand-crafted the dress (as she did, painstakingly, with all of our doll clothes), with smocking on the bodice, and I still have that dress.

I still miss them. xxx.

Alison

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Paul Hederer

My avatar is a variation of the regimental flag of the 4th Infantry Regiment "Hoch-und Deutschmeister," based in Vienna, in which my relatives served until the Great War.

It's actually a CD cover ;).

Paul

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