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hmsk212

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delta

Mine is the Wessex Wyvern - the badge of my first Regiment which is now (sadly) no longer in existence; mind you, having seen the infantry reorgansiations, it may come back again B)

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Guest C729LEE

:P I have only just put mine up.

I have only got a few photo's on my system at present, but there will be something more suited to our subject shortly.

Anyway, its my '99 Blade, just back from the IoM TT this year.

An absolute bullet.

Lee in Lincs :P

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whkay

This is Cpt Arnold Bannatyne Tough, the officer who lead the first wave of the Accrington Pals at Serre on 1/7/16, he remains in the same area today, in Queens Cemetery..( a lovely place, now!)

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Steven Broomfield

I and I've just managed to get 13 year-old daughter, Harriet, to put mine on for me - the badge of Hampshire Cricket!

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Clive Temple

Mine is a souvenir photo of my Grandmothers brother taken at the end of WW1. I have his brother and sisters souvenir photos too.

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daveuk6

Mine is my Great Uncle

ROBINSON, J., Rifleman, 2nd Rifle Brigade

He was mobilised in August 1914, and immediately drafted to France, where he saw much heavy fighting. He made the supreme sacrifice, being killed in action at La Bassée in November 1914. He was entitled to the 1914 Star, and the General Service and Victory Medals.

Dave

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CROONAERT

Another updated avatar - this time it's the badge of my local battalion of the East Lancashire Regiment (5th) in it's pre-1908 guise of the 2nd (Volunteer) Battalion East Lancashire Regiment. (Badge as worn between 1902 and 1908).

Dave.

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david murdoch

Mine is my grandfather's L.A.M.B badge off the side of his tropical helmet. The badges were "made in Mesopotamia" - It is a 2" diamond of thin tinplate, painted matt black, the "lamb" emblem was either white or cream (it is yellowed now). Not sure if it is stenciled or hand painted. Punched at each corner to sew onto the hat band. This was the emblem of the L.A.M.B brigade, late war, and up until they became armoured car companies . Sometimes seen painted on the side of RR armoured cars - I have not seen any photographs of anyone wearing one, apart from a couple of my grandfather in post war Mesopotamia. I would guess that both MGC and ASC personnel in the units would have worn this as common unit identity.

It must be quite rare, if only a few would be produced, and fewer found thier way back to the UK. Has anyone seen one or have one of these? I will post photos when I find my own way back to Scotland.

David

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Malcolm

Normally the Scottish Saltire waving but Poppies for November.

aye

Malcolm

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DMcNay

It was the badge of the Cameronians, but for November it's a Poppy. After that I think I'll go with something new...

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Keith Kendall
both my great grandfathers (in colour) and a great uncle.

Glynn

I love the way it changes.

How did you do that?

Regards

Keith

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Andrew Upton

Mine is my Great Grandfathers Brothers' (Ernest Densley) boxed Death Plaque and boxed Pair on a copy of his service record, all of which I was reunited with earlier this year.

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Old Chap

My photo is of my grandfather, Rfm John Quinn, 1st & 2nd Royal Irish Rifles and his brother Hugh, 6th Royal Irish Rifles.

Regards,

Bill

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andalucia

Captured2005-2-300003.jpg

Mine is my Great Grandfather John Hogan. A gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery. John was killed in action on 24th June 1917 and is buried at Ferme-Olivier Cemetery in Belgium.

With him in the picture is his wife Mary and his 3 sons. my grandfather is the boy at the front holding his fathers hand. Sadly my grandfather died in Italy during WW2. Sad thing here is that Mary gave birth to a daughter in March 1917 and John never got to see here. His daughter visited her fathers grave in Belgium when she was 80.

Tony.

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Roxy

Just found this thread. Very interesting. ( and now I know where Les Slackbladder got his inspiration for his book cover!)

That's me at the Royal International Air Tattoo in 1998.

Roxy

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Steven Broomfield

And I've just found a photo of the gorgeous Arletty.....

Edited by Steven Broomfield

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Max (UK)
Mine is my Great Grandfather John Hogan. A gunner with the Royal Garrison Artillery. John was killed in action on 24th June 1917 and is buried at Ferme-Olivier Cemetery in Belgium.

With him in the picture is his wife Mary and his 3 sons. my grandfather is the boy at the front holding his fathers hand. Sadly my grandfather died in Italy during WW2. Sad thing here is that Mary gave birth to a daughter in March 1917 and John never got to see here. His daughter visited her fathers grave in Belgium when she was 80.

Tony.

Tony, thankyou for that. I always find these old photos very interesting, especially with some writing about them. That is a sad story, but at least here we are almost 2006 and remembering them - as long as we remember and pass down, they are immortalized.

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FAAAEd

What interesting and memorable stories these avatars have revealed.

Mine is a Hawker Hunter T8, just one echo of my past.

I had a grandfather who was an RFC air mechanic serving in the Middle East during WW1 and he had a brother-in-law, a stoker, on the Tiger and Jutland. This stoker used to relate stories of time on destroyers, old turtlebacks, and on the small protected crusiser HMS Sirius. One tale related to rounding the Cape of Good Hope in the latter, during the early years of the twentieth century, when the ships boats were smashed to matchwood and the funnels flattened.

I enjoyed 'roughers' at sea. Pentland Firth in a Force 11-12 anybody? :D

I found a way of mixing the example of these two by becoming a 'tif in the FAA.

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andigger

I had to make an update... this is my great uncle Coleman who left Ireland to come to the US shortly before the war. When the US joined in 1917 he joined the Navy. Although I know very little about his life, I do know the choice to join the Navy was a result of the sea faring life he had lead in Ireland, he had two other brothers who also joined him. He died in 1924, about the age of 30 of tuberculosis.

Hopefully amongst my other projects I will be able to update you on what new information I can add to his story. Andy

post-1626-1135650355.jpg

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Mark Crame

My Great Grandfather, Frederick Charles Crame, as a Corporal on 11th December 1912, his wedding day.

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Guest neryone

The Nery Gun.....I'm a wife of and it just had to be the gun......

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Brigantian

Thiepval

Regards

Mark

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Borden Battery

My avatar is "The Three Inseparables" from the village of Theodore, Saskatchewan, Canada. They were childhood friends and joined up together with the 196th Western Universities Battation in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan in April 1916.

The shorter fellow is Pte. Tom Tracy [school teacher and parents operated the village Post Office] and he served with the Yukon Motor Machine Gun Battery. He was killed beside my Grandfather in late October 1917 at Passchendaele, was buried and later lost as an Unknown Soldier. His name is recorded on the Menin Gate.

In the middle is Pte. Richard Mercer [a Banker], my Grandfather. Pte. Mercer was with the Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery, 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade. He saw a lot of action, was wounded twice [Passchendaele and 1918 March Offensive] and injured once including having a silver cigarette case stop shrapnel over his left breast pocket. He later returned to Canada and took over the Post Office from his best friends parents. He was a very kind and gentle Grandfather and spent the rest of his life dedicated to serving his community in several capacities.

Pte. Walter Wylie is the tallest and was a medical student at the time of enlistment. He was hospitalized in England in late 1916 with "hammer toe" and missed selection into one of the Motor Machine Gun Brigades when the 196th Battalion was disbanded. For this, he ended up with the 46th CEF Battalion [aka The Suicide Battalion] and was finally wounded during "The Last Hundred Days" of the war near Amiens. He later returned to university in Canada and became a medical doctor.

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StAubyns

My Avtar is my Maternal Grandfather, Stoker Ernest Fletcher. He served throughout the war, firstly on the Dreadnought until May 1917 and then on the Wallflower (Malta Flotilla) from December 1917. He joined the Royal Yacht, Victoria & Albert in February 1921 until December 1922 when he was invalided out with TB of the lung. He died in March 1923. I found his unmarked grave, Plot 309 last year.

Regards

Geoff

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BeppoSapone

The pic that I am using at the moment was taken by my father in the late 1940s.

It is of the British Cemetery at Monte Cassino, before the wooden crosses were replaced with stone.

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