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WW1 Military Motors - 1916 set x 50 cards


Lancashire Fusilier

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Lancashire Fusilier

Here is a scene from the Slough Vehicle Dump, circa 1919. This shows a number of Crossley Tenders and nearly complete Crossley chassis. Most of these would have been re-furbished and sold on into the post war civilian market and others dismantled for spares.

Mike,

An excellent, very interesting photograph, which I had not seen before.

Those ex-WD vehicle auctions sprung up at the end of WW1, and no doubt, those vehicles shown in your photograph would have a staggering value today.

Regards,

LF

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Lancs,

The Slough vehicle dump was originally intended to repair and return damaged vehicles to the Western Front and other theatres of war. It did not start to operate to full effect until 1918, so a little late. The land it occupied is now the Slough Industrial Estate. Think that the last vehicles were re-furbed around 1925. So a considerable number passed through, including trucks, cars and motorcycles (the capacity was 16,000 vehicles per year). The magazine 'Old Motor' did a fascinating feature on the operation with some amazing illustrations, back in the early seventies, if you can find a copy.

The number of commercial vehicles registered in the U.K. increased from 82,000 in 1914 to 203,000 in 1924.

As you say the vehicles in that photo would be worth a considerable sum today. My late father recalled a large quantity of Crossley Tenders in derelict condition being left behind in Dublin, when the British Army left. This would have been in the early 1920's. Some of them were repaired and re-used by the newly emergent Irish Free State Army. The Crossley's had apparently a very recognisable exhaust note.

Regards,

Mike.

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About 10% of the

military stock were

Leylands (6,411)

and this Lancashire

manufacturer decided

to invest £500,000 in

buying back as many

vehicles as it could –

3,111. This included a

large batch ‘parked’ at

St Omer in northern

France.

Rather than take these vehicles back to the

plant at Leyland, the manufacturer also laid

out £225,000 for the Sopwith aircraft factory at

Ham near Kingston in Surrey where this stock

of vehicles would be reconditioned. Although

this was a huge investment for Leyland to make,

it felt it was the only way to control both the

quality and numbers of its vehicles coming back

onto the market. Sold with a guarantee, many

of these ex-RAF type Leylands gave long service

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Johnboy,

Re. Leyland military re-conditioned vehicles, my brother-in-law's late father was still driving one delivering bricks into the 1930's. This in Leigh, Lancashire.

Mike.

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When I first started in heavy haulage most of the Scammel Highwaymans and Handymans were ex WW2 issued.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Lancs,

The Slough vehicle dump was originally intended to repair and return damaged vehicles to the Western Front and other theatres of war. It did not start to operate to full effect until 1918, so a little late. The land it occupied is now the Slough Industrial Estate. Think that the last vehicles were re-furbed around 1925. So a considerable number passed through, including trucks, cars and motorcycles (the capacity was 16,000 vehicles per year). The magazine 'Old Motor' did a fascinating feature on the operation with some amazing illustrations, back in the early seventies, if you can find a copy.

The number of commercial vehicles registered in the U.K. increased from 82,000 in 1914 to 203,000 in 1924.

As you say the vehicles in that photo would be worth a considerable sum today. My late father recalled a large quantity of Crossley Tenders in derelict condition being left behind in Dublin, when the British Army left. This would have been in the early 1920's. Some of them were repaired and re-used by the newly emergent Irish Free State Army. The Crossley's had apparently a very recognisable exhaust note.

Regards,

Mike.

Mike,

Many thanks for the interesting information.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

About 10% of the

military stock were

Leylands (6,411)

johnboy,

There are other photographs of ex-WD Leyland lorries previously posted on this Thread, and here is another showing 2 ex-WD Leyland A-Type lorries and an AEC Y-Type lorry in civilian use after WW1.

Regards,

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Another clearer photograph, showing a Tilling-Stevens petrol-electric lorry in service with the French Army.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Here is another interesting photograph documenting the use of a Tilling-Stevens Petrol-Electric vehicle overseas, in Barcelona Spain.

Whilst this photograph of a Tilling-Stevens motorbus in service with the Spanish CGA ( Compania General de Autobuses ) bus company was taken post WW1, the design of the Tilling-Stevens radiator is an earlier WW1 period version.

Also of note, is the design of the bus' double-decking with the external staircases.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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phil@basildon

The Barcelona Tilling-Stevens lasted up until the 1950's after several rebuilds and converted to trolleybuses with a rather unusual central drivers cab. Ironically although the British army rejected the Tilling-Stevens in WW1 they had special models produced in WW2 as searchlight lorries (TS19 & TS20). Leyland produced the greatest number of military lorries but AEC were not far despite only making lorries from 1916.

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Lancashire Fusilier

The Barcelona Tilling-Stevens lasted up until the 1950's after several rebuilds and converted to trolleybuses with a rather unusual central drivers cab. Ironically although the British army rejected the Tilling-Stevens in WW1 they had special models produced in WW2 as searchlight lorries (TS19 & TS20). Leyland produced the greatest number of military lorries but AEC were not far despite only making lorries from 1916.

Phil,

Many thanks for the additional information.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier

Before starting posts on Tilling-Stevens' British military petrol-electric vehicles, here is a look at some Tilling-Stevens' petrol-electric vehicles used during and after WW1.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

2

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Lancashire Fusilier

3.

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

4.

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

5.

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

If any one is interested in the WDLR then buy Roy Links WDLR Album but make it quick,it is in it's 2nd print and selling fast. The book is brilliant.

Back on June 18, post # 3718, ifanlloyd kindly recommended the book " WDLR Album " by Roy Links, my copy of the book arrived yesterday, and although I have only just started reading it, I must agree with ifanlloyed, this book is " brilliant ". A very hefty book, jam packed with excellent information and many photographs relating to all aspects of the WW1 W^D's Light Rail, and a must for anyone interested in this subject.

Again, many thanks for the recommendation.

Regards,

LF

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Lancashire Fusilier
At the start of WW1, London had no existing effective Anti-Aircraft defences against German aerial attacks on the Capital, and by early 1915, with losses both in civilian deaths continuing to mount ( 524 killed and 1264 injured ) and property damage escalating to over 2 million pounds, the War Department finally decided to establish and arm an Anti-Aircraft Force for the defence of London.


With the British Army's already strained resources committed on the Western Front, it was decided that the Admiralty would take responsibility for forming London's Anti-Aircraft Defence Force.

Initially, the force was made up of part-time Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve ( RNVR ) officers and men, who were inadequately armed with 4 x 6-pounder Hotchkiss Guns and 6 x 1.1/2 pounder Pom Poms, they also had a few inferior acetylene searchlights which were described as having less power than many motorcar headlights.

Additionally, London had 2 x 3-inch Naval Guns manned by Royal Marines stationed at Tower Bridge and Regents Park, and subsequently 4 more 3-inch Naval Guns were added manned by R.N.V.R. personnel.


To substantially improve London's Anti-Aircraft defences, it was decided to set up an effective mobile Anti-Aircraft Defence Force suitably manned, armed and equipped who could act as a highly mobile Anti-Aircraft force to supplement London's fixed Anti-Aircraft positions.


In late 1915, Admiral Sir Percy Scott, who had been appointed by the Admiralty to take charge of the gunnery defence of London, requested Commander Alfred Rawlinson, R.N.V.R., who had previously worked on setting up the Anti-Aircraft defences of Paris, to establish, arm, man and equip such a mobile Anti-Aircraft Defence Force for London.


With Rawlison's previous knowledge of the successful French 75 mm ' AutoCanons ' used in Paris, Rawlinson's Royal Naval Anti-Aircraft Mobile Brigade was established, armed and equipped with the following :-


4 x 75 mm Quick Firing French ' AutoCanons ' mounted on French De Dion chassis.


1 x 3-inch 20 cwt High Velocity Quick Firing High Angle British Gun, mounted on a Daimler motor lorry.


1 x 3-inch 20 cwt High Velocity Quick Firing High Angle British Gun, mounted on a ' Trailer ' mounting.


8 x 3-pounder High Velocity Quick Firing High Angle Vickers Guns, mounted on Italian ' Lancia ' motor lorries.


4 x Automobile Searchlights mounted on Tilling-Stevens Petrol-Electric motor lorries.


It is very interesting to note that W. A. Stevens' original petrol-electric prototype Clement Talbot motorcar ( shown in post # 3740 ) was equipped with a searchlight to show the vehicle's dynamo fitted to the petrol-electric engine was capable of producing a suitable electric current, and it was this electric current generated by the Tilling-Stevens petrol-electric engine which powered Rawlinson's mobile searchlights, making the Tilling-Stevens Petrol-Electric vehicle highly suitable as a mobile searchlight lorry.


The first photograph shows 5 mobile Anti-Aircraft Guns, followed by a Tilling-Stevens petrol-electric mobile Searchlight Lorry from London's new Royal Naval Mobile Anti-Aircraft Defence Brigade taking part in the November 1915 London Lord Mayor's Show, with Commander A. Rawlinson, R.N.V.R., riding in the lead vehicle, a French De Dion, mounted with a 75 mm AutoCanon.


LF.


This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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Lancashire Fusilier

A 1915 Tilling-Stevens' trade advertisement promoting their ' Petrol-Electric Lorry 4-Ton Type with Searchlight mounted ' as supplied to the Admiralty.

The photograph used in the advertisement shows a Royal Naval Anti-Aircraft Mobile Brigade's Searchlight Lorry taking part in the Lord Mayor's Procession held in London on 9th November, 1915.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

The photograph used in the 1915 Tilling Stevens' trade advertisement shows a Royal Naval Anti-Aircraft Mobile Brigade's Tilling-Stevens Petrol-Electric Lorry 4-Ton Type mounted with a searchlight taking part in the November 9th, 1915 Lord Mayor's Procession through London.


It was particularly important for Londoners, who had been subjected to intense German aerial bombing over the previous year with much loss or life and property damage, to see that a new Anti-Aircraft Defence Force had been formed to effectively deal with the German aerial attacks, and on that dismal rainy day in November 1915, it must have been a great morale booster for Londoners to see the array of Anti-Aircraft weapons and equipment parade through the Capital.


The attached photograph, shows one of the four RNMAAB's Tilling-Stevens Petrol-Electric Searchlight Lorries parading in front of a contingent of Royal Marines, preceding the Searchlight Lorry, at the bottom of the photograph, is one of the 8 Royal Naval Mobile Anti-Aircraft Brigade's 3-pounder High Velocity Quick Firing High Angle Vickers Guns, mounted on an Italian ' Lancia ' motor lorry.



LF





This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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Lancashire Fusilier

The Tilling-Stevens' Petrol-Electric Searchlight Lorry ( shown in more detail ) was particularly well suited for operating a powerful searchlight, as it's on-board dynamo/generator powered by the Tilling-Stevens petrol-electric engine, produced sufficient electrical current to power the searchlight both when the lorry was mobile or stationary.



LF





This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.


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Lancashire Fusilier
Initially, the men, vehicles and equipment of the Royal Naval Mobile Anti-Aircraft Brigade were billeted at various locations throughout London, and then following a decision that a central barracks be provided for the Brigade, in November 1915, The Grand Duke Michael of Russia offered the ' palatial ' stables at his house at Kenwood, Hampstead as the Brigade's barracks and H.Q., and on December 5th, having moved into their new barracks at Kenwood House, the RNMAAB was able to parade there for inspection by Admiral Percy Scott.


With their new barracks established at Kenwood House, the RNMAAB began training and improving their response times to alerts and alarms given for an impending German aerial attack, and during one alarm practice held on December 28th, 1915, 6 mobile AA Guns were dispatched from Kenwood House following a 6.17 pm alarm, with the first gun being away at 6.20 pm, and all 6 mobile guns on the road by 6.25 pm, with the following results :-


No. 1 Gun - Ready for action - at Aldwych at 7 pm.


No. 2 Gun - Ready for action - at Higham Hill at 8.20 pm.


No. 3 Gun - Ready for action - at Manor Park at 7.45 pm.



No. 4 Gun - Ready for action - at Becton at 7.24 pm.



No. 5 Gun - Ready for action - at Streatham at 7.24 pm.



No. 6 Gun - Ready for action - at Clapham at 7.20 pm.



In addition to the new mobile Anti-Aircraft Guns available for the defence of London, there was also a corresponding substantial increase in the numbers of ' fixed position ' AA Guns stationed in and around London, which went from a total of 12 AA Guns ( 4 x 6 pounder + 8 x 3-inch ) on 15th Sepetember 1915, increasing to 40 AA Guns by 16th February 1916 ( 1 x 75 mm + 17 x 6 pounder + 18 x 3-inch + 4 x 4-inch ), with a further 98 AA Guns being prepared for deployment in and around London.

( figures from Commander Rawlinson's book on the AA Defence of London )


The attached photographs show one of the RNMAAB's Tilling-Stevens Mobile Searchlight Lorries and some of it's mobile Anti-Aircraft Guns being inspected by Admiral Percy Scott at the Brigade's new barracks and H.Q. at Kenwood House on December 5th 1915, also in attendance, was The Grand Duke Michael of Russia who had made premises at Kenwood House available to the RNMAAB.


LF




This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.




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Lancashire Fusilier

Another photograph showing a Tilling-Stevens' Petrol Electric 4-Ton Searchlight Lorry along with other RNMAAB Guns and vehicles being inspected by Admiral Percy Scott at the Brigade's new Kenwood House barracks and H.Q., on December 5th 1915.

The photograph also shows left to right, The Grand Duke Michael of Russia, Admiral Percy Scott ( in charge of the gunnery defences of London ) and Commander A. Rawlinson of the RNMAAB at the inspection parade.

Also note, all the RNMAAB vehicles are all clearly marked ' RN '.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

Another interesting photograph, again taken at the RNMAAB's barracks and H.Q., at Kenwood House, in which we can see at least 2 of the Brigade's 4 Tilling-Stevens 4-Ton Petrol-Electric Searchlight Lorries, plus an array of their mobile Anti-Aircraft Guns as listed in post #3767.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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Lancashire Fusilier

This photograph, is the last in the current series of my posts on the Petrol-Electric vehicles and the Tilling-Stevens Searchlight Lorry, and the start of a selection of photographs on the guns and equipment of the Royal Naval Mobile Anti-Aircraft Brigade.

This nicely detailed photograph shows a RNMAAB Tilling-Stevens Petrol-Electric Searchlight Lorry taking part in the 9th November 1915 London Lord Mayor's Procession, and being preceded by a RNMAAB 3-pounder High Velocity Quick Firing High Angle Vickers Gun mounted on a Italian ' Lancia ' 1Z 1.5-Ton 35 hp Light Lorry, which was one of the 8 mobile Vickers 3-pounders in service with the RNMAAB in November 1915, at the time this photograph was taken.

LF

This image is reproduced strictly for non-commercial research and private study purposes as permitted under the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, as amended and revised.

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