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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

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Gilles, no special PoW W. archives. I have studied though all related material from city archives that deal with the camp.

Thank you very much.

I would be interested to visit what is left to the PoW camp, some time in the near future. I shall be back to ask you for more info, if you don't mind.

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  • 1 year later...

I found this site whilst researching my Grandfather's war record. His was Cpl. George Alfred Bryant MM, and he spent 3 years in the field (3 chevrons) with the Royal Sussex Regiment, as a Company Runner. He was posted to Wahn Camp with the 1/4 Battalion and whilst there, laid out a 9 Hole golf course. I notice that there is a course on the site of the Wahn Camp and have written to the Club asking for it's history. I have a letter of commendation for his work written by Brig. General H. H. Tudor, Commander !st Eastern Brigade, Army of Rhine, an Artillery Officer.

I've noticed that there have not been any posts recently but hope that Egbert can perhaps enlighten me further.

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I picked this thread up today:  thank you for the photographs.  I am a regular visitor to Langemark, taking parties to see the Western Front, trying to show them that war hurts all the participants.  Your photographs show that it was not just on the front lines that soldiers of all nations suffered.  Please do not be discouraged in your efforts.

 

Richard

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17 hours ago, MichaelB said:

I found this site whilst researching my Grandfather's war record. His was Cpl. George Alfred Bryant MM, and he spent 3 years in the field (3 chevrons) with the Royal Sussex Regiment, as a Company Runner. He was posted to Wahn Camp with the 1/4 Battalion and whilst there, laid out a 9 Hole golf course. I notice that there is a course on the site of the Wahn Camp and have written to the Club asking for it's history. I have a letter of commendation for his work written by Brig. General H. H. Tudor, Commander !st Eastern Brigade, Army of Rhine, an Artillery Officer.

I've noticed that there have not been any posts recently but hope that Egbert can perhaps enlighten me further.

I am very familiar with the PoW site Wahn. There was never a golf course on site. No room. A modern golf course is some miles away but has no connection to Wahn AFB and its former PoW site. I would be interested about the location you have in mind. Probably your GF was just billeted in Wahn and planned a golf course in the surroundings during the occupation times.

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  • 1 month later...

The address of the Golf Course I have in mind is; Golfclub Wahn, Frankfurter Str. 320, 51147 Köln, Germany. This appears to be a 9 Hole course and is fairly close to  the old Camp Wahn. I've never had a reply from them but would still like to know when it was constructed.

Edited by Guest
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On ‎26‎/‎05‎/‎2018 at 10:05, egbert said:

I am very familiar with the PoW site Wahn. There was never a golf course on site. No room. A modern golf course is some miles away but has no connection to Wahn AFB and its former PoW site. I would be interested about the location you have in mind. Probably your GF was just billeted in Wahn and planned a golf course in the surroundings during the occupation times.

As I said the golf club/course you mentioned has no connection to PoW Wahn or the military camp at all. It was constructed sometimes in the 70s or 80s. I know the area very well!

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  • 8 months later...

Thank you so much for all of your wonderful information and photographs.

My grandfather, Harold Walker, 1st company, Grenadier Guard was taken prisoner 26th October 1914 at Ypres. He was in Wahn, according to a Nottingham newspaper article of the time . He was repatriated , arrived Dover 2nd December 1919. ( Red cross documents.) I have been looking at all the photographs. He was tall at 6ft 4 inches so should be easy to recognise, but I haven't yet. Am I correct in thinking that he must have spent nearly all of WW1 in the POW camp at Wahn? He had a work injury to his hand in August 1917 at Wahn ( insurance document). I am trying to piece together his story. This is a wonderful help. Thankyou.

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In 1915 many British PoW's were transfered to Limburg camp, but obviously your GF was one of the prisoners who stayed in Wahn. The PoWs used to work in the surrounding villages with the local farmers. up to 30-40km away from main camp. 

Glad my pictures are of help.

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Charlie,

Thank you. Yes I missed that second card on the RC site.Do you know what the words on column 5 , third line (c) mean Lax.Brild. Coblenz?

Where did you get the information that HW went to Limburg? He injured his knuckles in 1917, so that would have been the hospital visit to Coblenz. Many thanks

 

image.png.884f2a4c1c9f956371e6b0f80f017136.png

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PA12990 is a list of arrivals at Limburg dated 11 July 1917 , the third line in column 5 is for the person‘s previous whereabouts. The abbreviation on the third line is „Laz(arett) Brüd(er) Coblenz“ which is in itself an abbreviation for the Roman Catholic hospital „Brüderhaus St. Josef in der Goldgrube“. The hospital still exists in Koblenz, it was destroyed in WW2 but rebuilt afterwards. There is a photo of the hospital part way down https://de.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katholisches_Klinikum_Koblenz-Montabaur

 

Charlie

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Charlie,

Thank you so much for replying.

That is a great help.

My granddad lived until 1976. He was a wonderful father and granddad. He  spoke very little about the Great War. Or maybe we were too young to understand and ask. He told us about being in the trenches in mud, surrounded by rats. It is in recent years that my interest has grown and I try to understand and as we have grandchildren. 

It never occurred to me that the prisoners would be out of the camps working on farms or other meaningful work. But that does make sense as all the young local people would be away from home in the army and services.

Many thanks again

Val

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