Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Royal Scots


Tim Godden
 Share

Recommended Posts

13778 Pte William Rodden,2nd Bn kia 19/02/15.G-Grandfather of a mate of mine.Born avonbridge,enlisted bathgate .Any more info would be greatly appreciated.War diary for that day would be good !.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

hello,i have a privately type-written book called the "Journal of an Edinburgh Mountaineer" details one mans war from 1914  till he was wounded in the attack on HIGH WOOD plenty of good detail and many names {9th r.s.}

Sorry the PM was vague

Would be interested in his time at High Wood - when was he hit?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Can anyone help with information about Lt Kenneth Foster Bean? 7th Bn (possibly 2/7th?) Royal Scots. Died 12/04/1918. Buried in Godewaersvelde British Cememtery. He is on our school memorial. I have some social history (Father a brewer, older brother killed three months earlier with the RFC in 'Iraq'), but little about his military career.

Thanks

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi Dave

Lt Bean is listed as having Died of Wonds in the 'Officers Died in Great War' book. As the cemetery he is buried in is near the French/Belgian border, I assume he must have been wounded whilst on his way to meet up with the 1/7th Royal Scots who had sailed from Alexandria on the 11th of April 1918 for Marseilles. The 1/7th War Diary states they arrived at Marseilles on the 17th of April 1918.

Regards

LIT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave

Forgot to say that the 2/7th Royal Scots were part of the 194th [2nd Scottish] Brigade, 65th Division. They served in Ireland from January 1917 and were disbanded in March 1918. I would imagine that Lt bean then moved with the rest of the battalion to join the 1/7th Royal Scots when they rejoined the battle on the Western Front.

Regards

LIT

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry the PM was vague

Would be interested in his time at High Wood - when was he hit?

Hi the night attack of the 23/7/16 he was wounded by shellfire during the advance on high wood regards John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Dave

They served in Ireland from January 1917 and were disbanded in March 1918. I would imagine that Lt bean then moved with the rest of the battalion to join the 1/7th Royal Scots when they rejoined the battle on the Western Front.

Many thanks for that. I checked his medal card before replying but that was little help; it listed his unit as 2/7th Royal Scots, even though by this time they had ceased to exist. You've given some answers, but raised more questions.

What was he doing getting killed when he should have been joining his comrades in Marseilles? If the battalion was disbanded, were the men 'borrowed' en route to the South of France? Presumably there is no war diary for this period. Were there other 1/7 or 2/7 Royal Scots casualties at this time?

Any ideas gratefully received, because I have to admit I'm struggling on this one

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...
Guest crusoe89

Hi,

I am researching my Great Uncle:

No.16730 L/Cpl. William Wyber 11th Battalion Royal Scots

I have completed a search of the PRO (most of his records were destroyed) and found out lots of information from many sources including books on the Royal Scots and, most importantly, local libraries (the best information I found was from Clydebank Library who sent me two clippings from the 'Clydebank Press', including pictures of William and more details about his war service than I could possibly have found elsewhere - really invaluable!).

Anyway, I am new to historical research of this sort and started investigating my Great Uncle after finding a picture of him in the loft and his obituary in 'The Thistle - The Journal of the Royal Scots' (he died in 1974 and had a pretty heartbreaking life after the war).

The one aspect of his history that I have been unable to clarify through family and research, is how he came to be injured. An excerpt of the letter to his parents (which was also included in the Clydebank clippings) states that on April 24th 1917 he was 'wounded in arm and jaw' (he lost his right arm and his jaw was fractured), but I have been unable to find out in what circumstances. He was part of the 27th Brigade which was part of the 9th (Scottish) Division. The details I have been able to find out about their movements are vague, but I think they must have been at Arras, although I could not specify a particular battle.

Another curious aspect is that the officer who wrote to his parents was Major Pawson of the Cameron Highlanders who remarks about William that he 'always thought a lot of him', and I wondered how an officer of that regiment would have come to know him at all.

My Great Uncle recieved the Military Medal (for fighting at Longeuval, 1916) and Bar (for fighting on the Somme, 1916). He also received the Silver War Badge and was discharged due to wounds in October 1918.

Apologies if that was all rather long-winded! I found my Great Uncle's story very moving and just thought I would post his information here in case anyone ever comes across any further information about him (this forum is a wonderful resource!).

Thanks,

Dianne.

post-8299-1128721592.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

From the 9th Div History, despite air recce informing them that large forces had dug in along the Gaverelle - Rouex road orders were received to mount an attack. 11th and 12th Royal Scots attacked towards Rouex on the date concerned having assembled in Fampoux. Cameronians and KOSB were in support. The barrage was no good and the attack ground to a halt under intense mg fire and shellfire. Consequently the 26th Brigade which was due to advance through the 27th were stood down. The History states ' little can be said in defence of this battle which the Division fought with great reluctance'

Aye

Malcolm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest crusoe89

Thanks for your very quick reply!

That really fills in a lot of details for me. So sad that he would have been injured in such an ill-advised battle. I will certainly look into it further.

Thanks again,

Dianne.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd be very interested in talking to anyone researching 2/10th Bn Royal Scots, if they are (or 'one is').

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...
Guest Jimmy Knacky
7th: May 1915 to end of war

11th: May 1915 to March 1917

I have the war diaries for all the above for the dates I have been researching. Like the others, I have:

Happy to share with others for personal research.

Cheers for the info you sent me by email Garry

I have added it to this webpage

(Anyone feel free to take what info or pics you like)

1st Royal Scots (William Monaghan)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 year later...
All of them Tim.

Aye

Malcolm

Malcolm

I am researching my ggrandfather, 275503 Sgt John Maloney, who was in the following Bns:

6th Bn Jan 15 - Jul 16

15th Bn Jul 16 - Nov 16

1/6th Bn Dec 16 - Sep 17

5/6 Bn Dec 17 - Apr 18

4th Bn Jul 18 - Dec 18

Would you have any rlevant war diaries, photos or other info?

Regards

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi there,

Not sure which Battalions I’m looking for yet. I know my great uncle (Pte John Turner) served in the Royal Scots but haven’t been down to see the medal roll yet to find out which battalion he served in.

No doubt I will want to get in touch with some of you guys when I do know however.

-Paul

:D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 months later...

I have a book published by Edinburgh department store, Patrick Thomson , (PT's to the locals) in 1920 featuring pictures of the peace day and armistice day commemorations in 1919, several shots of the Royal Scots, 1st , 5th, 7th, 9th and 10th also Scots Guards and Gordon Highlanders, if anyone is interested I would be happy to post them.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Malcolm it's got the Dandy ninth coming out the station , the 1st are passing the Heart of Midlothian.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 1st passing the Heart of Midlothian, I think the man at the front may have partaken of the old custom of spitting on the Heart.

post-12171-1172261058.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The 9th cadre at the Waverly,its hard to see them for the crowd with some of Edinburgh's finest keeping back the over enthusiastic.

post-12171-1172261255.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Malcolm don't know what Battalion this is but here is the Guard of Honour for the Prince of Wales outside the Usher Hall.

post-12171-1172261730.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have seen the picture of the 1st RS marching out of Waverley with the men who had served 1914 -1918 with pennants on their rifles, I think there were four of them. It is in the Edinburgh Room in George IV Library.

Good photos, thanks.

Aye

Malcolm

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I've drawn a blank on the circumstances of death of 2nd Lt Kenneth Foster Bean, 7th Royal Scots, who died of wounds received in action at 11 CCS, France, on 12th April 1918. At this time the 1/7 Royal Scots were on board a ship from Alexandria to Marseilles, and the 2/7 had just been disbanded in Ireland. He is buried at GODEWAERSVELDE BRITISH CEMETERY (CWGC lists his rank as Lt).

Any ideas would be very welcome - I have a copy of his service papers if that will shed any light.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The ill fated 7th coming home in May,1919. The man indicated is Forum member Colin Heaney's Grandfather Robert Nicholson and I am grateful to him for contacting me.

post-12171-1172324391.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...