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how many of us are interested in gallipoli?


Guest gumbirsingpun

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Guest gumbirsingpun

hello to you all

whit i wuld like to know is how many o us on the forum are interested in gallipoli peninsula?

and what makes gallipoli special to you?,another question is how many o our members hae a relative who fell in gallipoli

regards

tuna

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Interested, yes. Because so many from my town died there in the short period of the campaign (mainly 6/Manchesters)

Special, no. Many died elsewhere

John

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hello to you all

whit i wuld like to know is how many o us on the forum are interested in gallipoli peninsula?

and what makes gallipoli special to you?,another question is how many o our members hae a relative who fell in at gallipoli

regards

tuna

I am researching the 9th Battalion Sherwood Foresters, 33rd Brigade, 11th Div. Their War Diaries vanished for Gallipoli. One of my distant relatives was wounded on Gallipoli whilst serving with 9th Bn. I did not find out until I started the research.

The battalions first Officer and Other Rank deaths were on 24 July 1915 on the Helles front. I suppose the thought of 250 men of 9th Battalion still being there makes it special to me. It was their first battle - Suvla Bay - by 21 August some 500 were casualties. The CO was killed leading his men and they were found in a straight line just behind the CO, facing the enemy.

The Battalion certainly won its spurs on Gallipoli and went on to fight with distinction on the Somme, During the Battle of Ypres 1917 and in the last 100 days.

750 of them paid the ultimate price and one of them won a Victoria Cross.

Of the men who lie on Gallipoli, hardly any have a known grave. (Public thanks Tuna for the Helles Memorial photos)

stevem

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If you were at Gallipoli then you really did get the sh*t-end of the deal. For me that is a primary reason why the memory and the location remain special.

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I do not know of any relatives who served at Gallipoli - so my interest lies in the casualties who were evacuated to the island of Malta for medical treatment and are buried here.

Regards

Wayne

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Hi,

Myself being a New Zealander means that Gallipoli is very special. The 25th of April 1915 is a day of great significance to New Zealands history. The 25th of April (ANZAC DAY) is a national holiday, and childhood memories of dawn parades and old men with REAL war medals are part of growing up here. On a personal note my family has two relatives who served at Gallipoli, one an Australian and one a New Zealander, a true ANZAC family if you like. The Australian was Trooper Henry Kolts of the 1st Australian light Horse, he arrived at Anzac cove in May of 1915 and was killed in action on the 7th of August 1915, the day the Australian light horse were slaughtered at the nek etc. The New Zealander was Private Thomas Willacy, 17th Ruahine Company, Wellington Battalion. He landed on the 25th of April 1915 and was wounded in the first few days of the campaign. His wounds were shrapnel to the left shoulder and neck, he found himself in a Hospital in Egypt on the 1st of May. He was sent back to New Zealand and arrived back here in the July of 1915. His wounds were quite serious in that he spent several months in hospital receiving treatment. He was finally discharged from the army in April of 1916. Discharged unfit for further service.

One day I will visit Gallipoli, take my children their and show them where thier relatives fought etc.

cheers Aaron.

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My pet Battalion is the Isle of Wight Rifles, the 8th Hampshires who were brigaded with the 5th Norfolks, as part of 163 Brigade, 54th Division. Their attack on the 12/8/15 has been immortalized and made myth as the "The lost Sandringhams" or "All the Kings Men", and I knew men who took part in that attack.

Gareth

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Being an Australian with English/Scottish roots, I would say that Gallipoli holds a special interest for most Australians, and should for all. It is a remembrance of our nations coming of age, although some groups recently are ignorant of that fact.

Being an Officer in the Royal Australian Navy, it holds a military interest for many reasons, including the HMAS Sydney - Emden battle en route (the RAN's first naval engagement) and the exploits of AE 2 (the first ship/submarine through the Dardanelles of any nation) much of which is unknown to most Australians, as the main focus is, quite rightly, on the land campaign.

Thirdly, it holds a family significance, as my Great Grandfather Private Albert Victor Chantry fought with the 23rd Battalion at Lone Pine. Luckily for me he was invalided home prior to the 23rds decimation at subsequent campaigns at Pozieres etc.

There is no prouder feeling than saluting the Australian White Ensign on ANZAC Day amongst your shipmates.

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My intrest is the 1/4th Royal Scots Fusiliers - mainly due to the wife's gradfather and great uncles involvement. Also the large number of local casualties. Most memorials in Ayrshire are covered in

Gallipoli casualties :(

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Along with the other Australians and New Zealanders, I grew up with Dawn Parade on April 25th. When you learn about history in school, you will always learn about Gallipoli and Anzac Day. One criticism is that there is - as always in any country - a slant from our perspective, and I would hazard a guess that some young people don't realise anyone else was at Gallipoli besides the Anzacs and the Turks.

I had at least 6 relatives on the Gallipoli peninsula - serving in the BEF, NZEF and AIF. Three of them are still there, although only 2 have known graves. Another of the 6 was severely wounded at Chunuk Bair.

Allie

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The principal reason that I am interested in Gallipoli is that my father fought there. He survived, but contracted malaria. He fought at the ANZAC bridgehead.

Interestingly (to me), my father fought with the Turkish Army, not the Allied forces. He had the greatest respect for the Turks, and felt that they were about the best soldiers he ever encountered, although he spent the rest of the war fighting in two of the top German storm units, and fought in the German civil war in 1919. Not that the Turks were top technically, but in spirit, in bravery. In the 1920's he was able to run some guns to the Turks, when the Greeks were invading deeply into Anatolia, and no one would help the Turks defend their heartland.

Bob Lembke

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Bob,

Excellent post, its great to get a perspective from all sides. Thanks for sharing that with us.

Allie, I think your right re young people and thier perceptions about the Anzacs and the first word war. I think that Gallipoli in the great scheme of the first world war gets too much exposure. Yes Gallipoli was the start of things for New Zealand in WW1, but the real damage was done in the mud of France and Belguim. Our schools do not teach enough of that.

cheers Aaron.

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Although I had been living in Turkey for more than 10 years by 2001 I had only visited the Gallipoli Peninsula "en route" too another place. A big change was about to occur when I went there in July 2002 and stayed for 5 days ... for a "proper" visit. I was "hooked" and since then I started visiting the peninsula on a regular basis till in 2004 I deceded I could as well live there ... and that's what I am doing since January 2005.

My initial interest was the unspoilt countryside which is very rare in Turkey. Then I started seeing the beauty of the place and fell in love; paralel the interest the Gallipoli Campaign grew. Today it is a "weird" mix because when I go for a walk I see the beauty of the countryside but -due to my reading about the campaign- I also know the horror that took place here ... to me an unbelievable experience.

Although I am Belgian I don't have any direct connection but -again because of the reading- they are all my family now ..

eric

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Gallipoli to me was just a failure during the Great War, until I realized I had a relative who fought and stayed there. Now I am interested in anything and everything about the East Yorkshire Regiment particularly the 6th Battalion. I look upon Gallipoli with awe and respect, hoping one day to go there and let Eric show me the beauty and tranquillity that the men that did not return now have.

Regards Charles

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I have had a general interest in Gallipoli for as long as I have had one in the Western Front but because my main interest is the Shropshire, and they were not at Gallipoli (other then those attach to the Herefords), I tend to lean towards the Western Front.

One of my relatives, Cpl. Daniel, Trow, 18661, of the 9/Worcs. D. of W. on 9/8/15 at Gallipoli, he as no known grave.

Annette

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Hi All

My intetest as the new boy to the group is three fold

I have a grand father and great uncle who both landed at ANZAC cove on the morning of the 25th April 1915

Sgt Benjaimn Champion E Coy 1st battalion and Cpl Arthur Champion E Company 1st battaion AIF, both survived gallipoli although Ben as a lieutenant lost his legs at Bapaume France and Arthur as a 2nd lieutenant ended the war with damaged lungs due to gas from the Somme

I am also a keen wargamer and love the World War One period

Plus i have had a long fasination for Gallipoli since my early childhood.

Andrew C

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My Grandad served there with the 11th Battalion (Finsbury Rifles) London Regt,and always told me what an absolute S**T Hole the place was,the Horrible Stench of Dead Bodies,coupled with Millions of Flies that got into every mouthful of Food that you attempted to Eat.Not to mention the severe case of Dysentry that got Him evacuated to Lemnos.

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Andrew;

Do you know how your grand-father lost his legs? We may have a nutty connection. Was it near Bapaume, or in Bapaume?

PBI;

My father's stories about living conditions with the Turks did not exactly suggest a resort, like flying out to Rhodes for a summer break. The water was especially nice.

Bob Lembke

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Good afternoon Bob

I am not sure of that - some of his story has been featured in the Latest Les Carylon book "The Western Front" except it leaves him as a Sgt not as an officer - it was around the time of his promotion that his legs were lost - family stories tell of him being caught in an artillery barrage but as to which sides artillery i am not sure.

Ben’s war diaries for Gallipoli and France are located within the Australian War Memorial in Canberra - but each time i have been there I have not been able to access them due to refurbishments going on or other interruptions to normal access.

A little about Ben to make sure we are talking about the same person. Ben was a dental apprentice prior to joining the AIF. He left that to serve and resumed training after the war becoming a dentist which was his career for his life – in his latter life he wrote the history of the Hunter Valley and was awarded an honorary doctorate from Newcastle University for his work. He was a keen historian and donated many of the family war relics to the Australian War Memorial.

Please let me know of the strange link - now i am intrigued.

Regards

Andrew

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post-19000-1171346762.jpgHi again Bob

I have had some luck i gain checked the records depatment and came up with the following which has now been released.

Ben William Champion

Regimental Number 2481

Serial Number 2455

1st Battalion AIF

Landed at Gallipoli 25/4/15 as a private

Wounded at Gallipoli shrapnel to face and thigh 30/11/1915

Evacuated from Gallipoli with Malaria 21/1/1916 (coincidence)

Promoted Lance Corporal 12/3/16 Egypt

Promoted Sgt 13/8/16 France

Promoted 2nd lieutenant 18/11/16 France

Promoted Lieutenant 26/11/16 France

During his war service Ben was wounded 3 times the last resulting in the loss of only one leg due to GSW at Etaples on 18/4/1918 - he must have lost his other leg after the war as a result of old wounds ?????? - no artillery barrage as the family story went.

I have attached a copy of his Gallipoli service record

Regards

Andrew

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Good afternoon Bob

Please let me know of the strange link - now i am intrigued.

Regards

Andrew

You said "in Bapaume", not near, etc. I do not know of fighting in the city.

My father worked on putting a bomb in the basement of the Bapaume city hall, consisting of 13,000 pounds of dynamite on a pair of two-week chemical/electrical fuses. He explained a lot about it. When the Germans pulled out I believe that the Australians took over.

In order to deceive the occupiers the Germans also left an easily-found bomb, which was found.

When it went off Pop was 20 miles away, in a tree, and the ground shook. The bomb went off 15 minutes late, after two weeks. So I thought that there was a chance that my father blew your grand-father's legs off. A good basis for a night in a pub.

But it seems that the Australians were suspicious, even though they found the first bomb, so the army did not occupy it, as they had before the Germans took Bapaume, but only put Red Cross types in the city hall, so that the bombing only killed about 15 people. Pop also worked on putting in a lot of other smaller booby-traps for the retreat to the Hindenburg Line.

Anyone knowing more about this bombing, having photos, etc., please pipe up.

I believe that Pop also worked on mining warfare at the ANZAC bridgehead (he had gone to a school for construction engineering in Frankfurt-am-Oder before he joined the Pioniere), and was always rather clever with blasting, even about the house, to the displeasure of his neighbors in the US about 1930. (Wanting to move some stuff about, he set off a case of dynamite at mid-night, and then insisted the next day that he had not heard a thing, that he was a sound sleeper. The houses were fairly far apart.) He also did a lot of blasting for the US Navy in the 1940's, keeping a case of dynamite under his cot in his tent. He had the detonators well hidden. His father was a Feuerwekr=Offizier, or "Explosives Officer", and in the invasion of Belgium was sent out by the War Ministry with cars and an escort to find goodies, finding the secret Belgian national stockpile of 1100 rail cars of nitrates, finding the explosives underground with his trained nose.

As an officer cadet I received a treasured "atta-boy" for devising a method of rigging a toilet with a quarter pound block of TNT and a mouse-trap detonator, so as to blow up and kill anyone flushing the toilet. But I have never actually had an opportunity to blow someone up, despite my family tradition. But one can always hope!

Bob Lembke

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tuna

Beam me up - this is my real passion!! I've been researching an entire platoon for the last 15 years and have a heap on informatioin which I hope to publish soon! Why because it's a human story that must be told! :)

Zack

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Hi Tuna

Of great interest to me my Great Uncle 18043 Private Samuel George Harvey served in 'C'' Coy &th Battallion Royal Dublin Fusilliers. Landed at Suvla Bay August 1915, wounded and died from those wounds in General Military Hospital, Alexandria, Egypt on 2 September 1915. Buried at Chatby Cemetery Alexandria. I have original letters of condolence from hospital matron and pardre at hospital.

Peter

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I have interests in all theatres where my relatives fought, and in many cases never came back.

With regard to Gallipoli, two of my late gran's cousins fought over there.

Private Stanley Henry Scarff, with the 1/5th Suffolks, was killed in action on 12th August 1915 during the abortive attack when the Sandringham Company of the Norfolks famously 'disappeared' (though the same could be said of 70-odd of the Suffolks who were killed / went missing in action that day - only 2 have known graves!).

Private Douglas Arthur Albert Phillips of the RMLI served with Deal Battalion at Dunkirk and Antwerp in 1914, served in Gallipoli in 1915, and survived numerous scrapes whilst with the 1st Battalion RMLI on the Ancre in 1916, only to be killed during the opening stages of the Battle of Miraumont on 17th February 1917.

cheers

Steve

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