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Remembered Today:

Favourite Gravestone Inscription


ianw
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"THE SHADOWS HAVE DEPARTED

AND HIS DAY IS BRIGHT"

Seen on a WW2 gravestone in Cockermouth Cemetery, Cumbria this week.

It struck me as moving and simple.

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Whilst tracing the graves of cricketers killed in action around The Somme in early 2000 I found a message in the visitors book for one cemetery from an 84 year old lady who had simple written "to the father I never met" - that brought a lump to my throat.

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  • 2 weeks later...

On a recent visit to the Ypres Salient and Northern France (we did Hedley Malloch's War Walk with a Difference!), Aurel Sercu, that indefatigable Fleming, showed us Le Peuplier Cemetery. In it the graves were mainly Scottish and there were many moving epitaphs.

Perhaps the most moving epitaph was : 'Some Day I'll Understand'.

All the best,

Fred

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21925 Private H.W.Carter, The Queen's 14th June 1917 : "Weep not for me my loved ones dear, I am not dead but sleeping here"

18389 Guardsman H.J.Cobb, Coldstream Guards 15th July 1917: "He was too young to fight and too young to die"

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Two rather different ones I saw in Salonica:

Lance Cpl J Bailey Manchester Regiment

This son gave his life

Trying to avenge

My other two

Corporal A Williams 22 Londons

Could we have raised

His dying head

And heard his last farewell

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I was in Shrapnel Valley cemetery, round the corner from ANZAC cove a few days ago and came across an excellent epitaph. I immediately thought that it made him sound like the sort of man you would like to have a drink with, so I called the rest of the group over and we looked at it together A DINKUM AUSSIE, was all it said. I was so impressed that I forgot to take a photograph or note who it was! If anyone can enlighten me I should be grateful and if anyone is visiting in the near future. It was in the section of the cemetery furthest up the valley, about three or four rows back from the wall.

Jack

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I was in Shrapnel Valley cemetery, round the corner from ANZAC cove a few days ago and came across an excellent epitaph.  I immediately thought that it made him sound like the sort of man you would like to have a drink with, so I called the rest of the group over and we looked at it together A DINKUM AUSSIE, was all it said.  I was so impressed that I forgot to take a photograph or note who it was!  If anyone can enlighten me I should be grateful and if anyone is visiting in the near future.  It was in the section of the cemetery furthest up the valley, about three or four rows back from the wall.

Jack

Three words that speak volumes, especially to an Aussie.

It was probably the highest thing they could say of an Australian Soldier.

Cheers

Kim

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I was in Shrapnel Valley cemetery, round the corner from ANZAC cove a few days ago and came across an excellent epitaph.  I immediately thought that it made him sound like the sort of man you would like to have a drink with, so I called the rest of the group over and we looked at it together A DINKUM AUSSIE, was all it said.  I was so impressed that I forgot to take a photograph or note who it was!  If anyone can enlighten me I should be grateful and if anyone is visiting in the near future.  It was in the section of the cemetery furthest up the valley, about three or four rows back from the wall.

Jack

Hi Jack

This epitaph belongs to L/Cpl Gordon Peter CAMERON, 88, 7th Battalion, AIF.

He was the foster son of Mr W.H. PEGG, and was a 24 year old Tramway Conductor from West Brunswick, Victoria, who volunteered for service 2 weeks after war broke out.

Having once again volunteered, this time to take part in a bombing raid on a crater near German Officer's Trench, he gave his life to a Turkish bomb on the 12 Jul 1915. A Dinkum Aussie for sure!

Lest We Forget

Frev.

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Frev

Thanks for taking the trouble to reply and giving me the background. As I thought and as the story shows, a great man and a worthy son of Australia.

Jack

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  • 1 month later...

Today was the first time I'd ever come across 'The Great War Forum' and was drawn to this particular thread at the very beginning. Reading all the pages has been heart wrenching, keeping my eyes wet throughout. Thank you to all who have quoted inscriptions from War Graves.

Although our family lost a couple of members in WWl, a few more in WWll, the majority made it home again. The latter includes both my parents.

I am wondering if an inscription was put on a grand-uncles' WWl grave, but cannot determine which he may be within the Commonwealth Graves web site, nor the Scottish Honour Roll. Also not sure which Corps he was with. I'd only know I had the correct David BAIN if his parents and/or wife were mentioned. He is believed to have died at Arras France in 1917, but that is second-hand info from my uncle who wasn't born until 1921, so not sure if true or not.

Thank you for this wonderful thread; please keep it going!

Toni ~ Ontario Canada

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Today was the first time I'd ever come across 'The Great War Forum' and was drawn to this particular thread at the very beginning. Reading all the pages has been heart wrenching, keeping my eyes wet throughout. Thank you to all who have quoted inscriptions from War Graves.

Although our family lost a couple of members in WWl, a few more in WWll, the majority made it home again. The latter includes both my parents.

I am wondering if an inscription was put on a grand-uncles' WWl grave, but cannot determine which he may be within the Commonwealth Graves web site, nor the Scottish Honour Roll. Also not sure which Corps he was with. I'd only know I had the correct David BAIN if his parents and/or wife were mentioned. He is believed to have died at Arras France in 1917, but that is second-hand info from my uncle who wasn't born until 1921, so not sure if true or not.

Thank you for this wonderful thread; please keep it going!

Toni ~ Ontario Canada

Can your Uncle not remember anything of the family ? I assume that your relative did not serve in a Canadian Regiment. Do you know where they were from, as there are other ways of getting closer such as the Soldiers Died In The Great War (SDGW) records.

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Toni

The only David Bain who is listed by the CWGC site as commemorated on the Arras Memorial is Private David Bain SP/3633 24th Bn. Royal Fusiliers. He had a Scottish connection having been born in Methven and resident in Perth. He enlisted in London and was killed in action 30/04/1917.

Myrtle

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"Vanished Hand " quote, is, I think, from Tennyson's "In Memoriam".

From Break, Break, Break by Tennyson ?

First line of inscription is also the title of a watercolour by Walter Langley (1852-1922) in Birmingham Museum and Art Gallery. Seems to show a widowed fisherman's wife and children.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Two WW2 inscriptions that had me near to tears one bright sunny day at Hawkinge:

Pilot Officer J.T.Johnston (of Canada), Pilot, Royal Air Force, 15th August 1940, Age 26:

WARM SUMMER SUN SHINE HERE

WARM SUMMER WIND BLOW SOFT

BLUE SKIES ABOVE BE BRIGHT

DEAR HEART, GOODNIGHT

And...

Pilot Officer C.E.Johnson, Air Gunner, Royal Air Force, 28th August 1940, Age 35:

TO LIVE IN THE HEARTS

OF THOSE YOU LOVE

IS NOT TO DIE

MY LOVE ALWAYS

YOUR WIFE

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  • 8 months later...
The wonderful personal messages that one chances across in CWGC cemeteries never fail to touch the heart. Every visit throws up a number that stay in the mind.

My last trip produced the following that brought me up short and put a lump in my throat.

A LITTLE CROSS OF BRONZE

THE CROSS HE WON

BUT NEVER WORE

MY SON

I'll think of these words when I next handle a 1914 or 1915 Star.

Ian, I know it was a long time ago, but did you ever remember where you saw that epitaph ?

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