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Favourite Gravestone Inscription


ianw
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This one was pointed out to me during a visit to the Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos.

It's on the grave of Captain Guy Charles Boiceau Willock, London Irish Rifles, died 25 September 1915, aged 23. The inscription reads: “Shot whilst leading his men over the top. He was loved by all who knew him, a brave soldier and a gallant gentleman of never failing cheerfulness, contemptuous of danger. Peace, peace, he is not dead he doth not sleep he hath awakened from the dream of life”

Now, it’s 257 characters ... how did the family manage to get around the rules?

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One of my favourites thanks to Paul (Pgmh78) who told me about Guardsman G E Kelsall in the Guards Cemetery at Windy Corner, Givenchy. When he died aged 22 on 11th August 1915 he would have been Private Kelsall but the headstone now describes him as Guardsman. I will honour his mother's wish next time I am there.

post-101238-0-54490900-1383685200_thumb.

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This is on the gravestone of Frances Henry Considine, killed in the air raid on Folkestone, 25 May 1917

"We do not know what pain he had
We only saw him die
We only know he passed away
and could not say good bye"

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This one was pointed out to me during a visit to the Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos.

It's on the grave of Captain Guy Charles Boiceau Willock, London Irish Rifles, died 25 September 1915, aged 23. The inscription reads: “Shot whilst leading his men over the top. He was loved by all who knew him, a brave soldier and a gallant gentleman of never failing cheerfulness, contemptuous of danger. Peace, peace, he is not dead he doth not sleep he hath awakened from the dream of life”

Now, it’s 257 characters ... how did the family manage to get around the rules?

Several possibilities:

It's could be an error. Far more likely is it is either a very early experimental stone, or my money would be on it having replaced some sort of earlier permenant marker that family or friends had erected that contained that inscription. I recall reading about a similar example on here where the IWGC wanted to remove such a war-time erected marker when the standard stones were being put in post-war, to ensure uniformity, and the family agreed after a concession to include the original longer inscription from the marker.

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I like this one on Lieutenant Stannus Geoghegan's Grave

"He was one of the bravest and most willing Subalterns I have ever Met" His Captain.

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Several possibilities:

It's could be an error. Far more likely is it is either a very early experimental stone, or my money would be on it having replaced some sort of earlier permenant marker that family or friends had erected that contained that inscription. I recall reading about a similar example on here where the IWGC wanted to remove such a war-time erected marker when the standard stones were being put in post-war, to ensure uniformity, and the family agreed after a concession to include the original longer inscription from the marker.

Your second option could well be right, as from memory it certainly looks the same as all the others, and it's in the middle of a row of standard graves.

Thanks.

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  • 2 months later...

The two above are 1944 headstones.. I believe the title of this forum has escaped the notice of this poster!

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  • 1 month later...

This one was pointed out to me during a visit to the Dud Corner Cemetery, Loos.

It's on the grave of Captain Guy Charles Boiceau Willock, London Irish Rifles, died 25 September 1915, aged 23. The inscription reads: “Shot whilst leading his men over the top. He was loved by all who knew him, a brave soldier and a gallant gentleman of never failing cheerfulness, contemptuous of danger. Peace, peace, he is not dead he doth not sleep he hath awakened from the dream of life”

Now, it’s 257 characters ... how did the family manage to get around the rules?

Just visited this cemetery and saw this gravestone then your post. Thought it would be good to include

post-99960-0-75791600-1396887071_thumb.j

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It is the age of this boy that I find so sad.

There is a lot of evidence that not only was John Condon not 14 at the time of his death (he was 18, nearly 19), but also that the remains were misidentified after they were exhumed and they should now be recognized as those of a far more likely candidate:

http://www.jackclegg3.webspace.virginmedia.com/Condonevidence.htm

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  • 2 weeks later...

My relative, Osborne Dye, has a very straightforward, but very heart-wrenching inscription.

Buried in Redoubt Cemetery, Helles, Gallipoli.

PLY/142(S)

Private O Dye

Plymouth Battalion, RMLI

"A beloved son, worthy of a better fate"

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  • 2 weeks later...

Here are some Old Olavian Epitaphs:

BURN E;H;A DEAR EDDIE, COOL AND COURAGEOUS, EVER READY

COCK E M TRUE LOVE BY DEATH, TRUE LOVE LIFE IS TRIED,TRUE THOU FOR ENGLAND, AND FOR ENGLAND DIED

HALLIWELL W AND HOW CAN MEN DIE BETTER THAN FACING FEARFUL ODDS

MAYBROOK W R A GENTLEMAN UNAFRAID

WENSLEY H W YOU AND FRED MADE A NOBLE SACRIFICE. BOTH LIE WITH THE GLORIOUS

Josturm

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