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Remembered Today:

Favourite Gravestone Inscription


ianw
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How must Emma MC DOWELL have felt?

I sincerely hope that she was a strong woman.

Cnock.

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DOZINGHEM MIL CEM

Gunner Joseph HATCHER, 144th Siege Bty, +6/11/1917

WE DO NOT KNOW WHAT PAIN HE BORE

WE ONLY KNOW HE NOBLY FELL

AND COULDN'T SAY GOODBYE

Cnock

post-7723-1125179640.jpg

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Yes, thinking of Emma and her burden. What an enormous weight of grief this dreadful conflict produced.

Thanks to those who left us these inscriptions that pass down to us a memory of the texture of that grief and loss.

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Private Morrissey came from Kilkenny and is buried in Cabaret Rouge Souchez. The inscription reads " HE DIED FOR ENGLANDS GLORY AWAY FROM ERIN'S ISLE" . I've always found that sad. Does anyone recognise the quotation? I've been told it may be from a song or poem current at the time but maybe his parents or relatives composed it themselves.

Kevin

post-3843-1125221618.jpg

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Simon Bull
Steve is right about the payment.

'Debts' were not vigourously chased and after a while the charges became voluntary. During WW2 all charges were voluntary.

However, it certainly was a barrier for some n-o-k early in the process as the charge was significant. It was partly instituted so that the n-o-k would feel an increased 'ownership' of the grave. Hardly necessary, I would have thought.

Terry

Was there any charge after WW2?

It is my impression that gravestone inscriptions from relatives are much more common on WW2 gravestones, which I assume is either down to it being free to have such an inscription or to greater prosperity.

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Another consideration must be that more people were literate in the late 1940s.

Many WW1 epitaphs were lost opportunities simply because the next of kin could not read or write.

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"How lucky all you UK folks are being so close to battlefields!!! "

Yes we are ... but our ancestors weren't ...

Eric

(A Belgian in Turkey)

PS : Belgium has the MOST battlefields per square km ... subsequently the civilians have suffered alot as well in the last 2000 years ...

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en niemand schrikt meer wakker in de nacht,

en niemand vreest nog voor een nieuwe morgen

And nobody wakes up terrified anymore in the middle of the night

and nobody is frightened any longer of a new morning

eric

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en niemand schrikt meer wakker in de nacht,

en niemand vreest nog voor een nieuwe morgen

And nobody wakes up terrified anymore in the middle of the night

and nobody is frightened any longer of a new morning

eric

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  • 2 weeks later...

A few ... just a few from Gallipoli.

CASTLE Private George Philip, 2nd Battalion, AIF.

Lone Pine Cemetery

At Rest

COLLETT Private Henry, 24th Battalion, AIF.

Lone Pine Cemetery

Could I Just Clasp Your Hand Once More Just To Say, Well Done

COOLING Sergeant William Henry, 26th Battalion, AIF.

Embarkation Pier Cemetery

Peace Perfect Peace

GORMAN Private Thomas Ernest Tasman, 12th Battalion, AIF.

Shrapnel Valley Cemetery

Elsewhere

HECHLE Private George, 13th Battalion, AIF.

Beach Cemetery

Deeds Not Words

LOWNDES Trooper Edward Whitaker, 3rd Light Horse Regiment, AIF.

Beach Cemetery

Well Done Ted

NEWTON

Sergeant Roland, 14th Battalion, AIF.

Courtney's & Steel's Post Cemetery

Our Anzac

PETTIGREW Private Angus George, 14th Battalion, AIF.

Courtney's & Steel's Post Cemetery Special Memorial 34.

He Heard The Call

Stood The Test. He Died

A Hero, One Of The Best

SMITH

Private Thomas, 9th Battalion, AIF.

Shell Green Cemetery

His Country Called

He Answered

STRANG Private William Andrew, 10th Battalion, AIF.

Shrapnel Valley Cemetery

Some Day We Will Understand

Jonathan the one at shell green is for CONNETT Private Herman Oswald, 11th Battalion, AIF and goes :

Our Daddy Died For Britain And Us

I was there today ... walking .... agaaaiin ...

cheers eric

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Jonathan the one at shell green is for CONNETT Private Herman Oswald, 11th Battalion, AIF and goes :

Our Daddy Died For Britain And Us

I was there today ... walking .... agaaaiin ...

cheers eric

Yes I visited Herman a couple times when I last visited - was my RBL cross still there (I dont suppose many Turkish children visit Shell Green).

His service record is online on the AWM link. The children were Frederick (who claimed his father's Gallipoli Star in 1967) and Olive. His widow's was Christina and Herman was born in Cumberland in the north-west of England. Have a look at his record. http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/Imagine.asp

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Thanks Marina,

And would that be Danish or ...

Indeed some were more "australialistic"

LAWRENCE Trooper Jack Warren, 6th Light Horse Regiment, AIF.

Shell Green Cemetery

A True Australian Patriot

MILLS Private Thomas Hamlyn, 24th Battalion, AIF.

Lone Pine Cemetery

He Died To Save Australia

Our Anzac Hero

And some more "idealistic"

SCOTT Corporal George Phillip, 14th Battalion, AIF.

Quinn's Post Cemetery

For Democracy

TAYLOR Private John Low, 24th Battalion, AIF.

Lone Pine Cemetery I.C.34.

He Died For Freedom

cheers

eric

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A quote from a headstone I was tracing in Belguim (Bedford House Cemetary).

The poor soldier was a cousin of my Granddad.

"REST DEAR SON

THY BATTLE WON

WE SHALL MEET AGAIN

BELOVED ONE"

I have a few photos of Bedford House and Tyne Cot if anyone is interested. They are digital and a high resolution. Too big to put on this forum but happy to email.

Mark Field

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Life is a city of crooked streets.

Death is the market place where all souls meet.

Quite enigmatic, it was (from memory wish I'd photographed it) on a headstone in Zillebeek Churchyard.

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Life is a city of crooked streets.

Death is the market place where all souls meet.

Quite enigmatic, it was (from memory wish I'd photographed it) on a headstone in Zillebeek Churchyard.

That is an interesting one - the more I think about it, the more I lilke it.

Marina

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That is an interesting one - the more I think about it, the more I lilke it.

Marina

I've done a bit of googling on the quote and it comes from the gravestone of John Gadsden in 1739 in a Buckinghamshire Churchyard.

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Kleine Vierstraat British cem

L/C Harry BROWNE, kia 24/4/1918 - age 50

he gave his life where it was needed most,

one fearless soldier of a glorious host

Regards,

Cnock

post-7723-1127828647.jpg

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