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Remembered Today:

Militaria Displayed


Khaki
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Dear GreyC,

Quite right you are!

Kindest regards,

Kim.

Dear bigred,

This is an DSC_0373.JPG.6f185add274cc0dfd5897a1dc99329b0.JPGunusual one from my collection.

Kindest regards,

Kim.

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Hi Kim!

That display looks really nice. What is the first one called? I have never seen it before and I don´t know much about British medals. I am afraid. The last medal shown on the bar seems to be missing below?

Thank you,

GreyC

Edited by GreyC
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Dear GreyC,

Thanks for that.

He, Lt-Col Morgan Dockrell, researched well, and happily I managed to obtain an Image of him (which is always my aim).

In old age, although apparently fit, he committed suicide.

Dockrell made his career, untypically, in Cantonments. For the latter services he was awarded the Kaisar-i-Hind, Second class in Silver (a decoration usually awarded to British medical officers), 'For Services to India'...

Yes, you are right: the last ribbon on the bar is the 1937 Coronation Medal. Clearly, he wore the large medals On Parade, but had possibly retired when the 37 Coro was awarded, and did not bother to have his group remounted, including the last medal. However, he had the full compliment of ribbons mounted!759033317_EnhancedDockrellImagebyGWF.jpg.baf912d8d9fcc452682861a14907cde3.jpg

Kindest regards,

Kim.

Edited by Kimberley John Lindsay
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2 hours ago, GWF1967 said:

Thanks for posting, interesting items.

Can you tell me where the ridged helmet (top left) is from please.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brodie_helmet

 

"Portugal

  • M1916: on Portugal's entry into the First World War in 1916, the country lacked the facilities to produce its own helmets and looked to the United Kingdom. British helmet production at that time was giving priority to their own forces, however the Director of Munitions Supply was able to source a commercially produced version of the Brodie helmet, originally intended to be sold to British officers at the time when helmets were in short supply. Given the Portuguese designation "M1916", it equipped the Portuguese Expeditionary Corps. Made of thin-gauge steel, the bowl was fluted in an attempt to add strength. Unfortunately, the fluting actually increased the chances of penetration if a missile hit one of the ridges, so some M1916s were produced with a plain bowl. A simple liner was laced to the shell through a series of holes."

 

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30090857

 

https://ww2-weapons.com/portuguese-army/

 

Portuguese Army on the Western Front
 
 
Edited by Andrew Upton
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8 hours ago, Andrew Upton said:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brodie_helmet

 

"Portugal

  • M1916: on Portugal's entry into the First World War in 1916, the country lacked the facilities to produce its own helmets and looked to the United Kingdom. British helmet production at that time was giving priority to their own forces, however the Director of Munitions Supply was able to source a commercially produced version of the Brodie helmet, originally intended to be sold to British officers at the time when helmets were in short supply. Given the Portuguese designation "M1916", it equipped the Portuguese Expeditionary Corps. Made of thin-gauge steel, the bowl was fluted in an attempt to add strength. Unfortunately, the fluting actually increased the chances of penetration if a missile hit one of the ridges, so some M1916s were produced with a plain bowl. A simple liner was laced to the shell through a series of holes."

 

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30090857

 

https://ww2-weapons.com/portuguese-army/

 

Portuguese Army on the Western Front
 
 
 
 

 

Many thanks Andrew.

 

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Thank you Kim,

a very nice looking medal. I think the personal attribution to a medal (set) makes the whole thing so much more interesting and relevant.

GreyC

Edited by GreyC
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the ridged helmet design was a helmet sold privately from all sorts of gentlemen s clothing outfitters to British troops ....mainly officers as they were expensive but were only made from mild steel ,when hit caused more injury as they broke apart and were band early on in the war, and the design was taken on board by the Portuguese and used in ww1

Edited by bigred
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Posting for Ken (New3.2) - his amazing trench mortar collection

IMG_7288.jpg.a27f785546665b1b95067176570a1ec8.jpg

 

IMG_7289.thumb.jpg.946602f419f339a8726c289f27fe4b30.jpg

 

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Thanks Chris for helping out with photo posting once again.  The TM's are huddled together for I need the room for preparation of a display for the Baltimore show.  This is the only warm display area.

New 3.2

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On 20/12/2018 at 19:05, Andrew Upton said:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brodie_helmet

 

"Portugal

  • M1916: on Portugal's entry into the First World War in 1916, the country lacked the facilities to produce its own helmets and looked to the United Kingdom. British helmet production at that time was giving priority to their own forces, however the Director of Munitions Supply was able to source a commercially produced version of the Brodie helmet, originally intended to be sold to British officers at the time when helmets were in short supply. Given the Portuguese designation "M1916", it equipped the Portuguese Expeditionary Corps. Made of thin-gauge steel, the bowl was fluted in an attempt to add strength. Unfortunately, the fluting actually increased the chances of penetration if a missile hit one of the ridges, so some M1916s were produced with a plain bowl. A simple liner was laced to the shell through a series of holes."

 

https://www.iwm.org.uk/collections/item/object/30090857

 

https://ww2-weapons.com/portuguese-army/

 

Portuguese Army on the Western Front
 
 

 

PC200683.JPG

 

 

from a Canadian collection

Edited by robins2
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17 hours ago, bigred said:

the ridged helmet design was a helmet sold privately from all sorts of gentlemen s clothing outfitters to British troops ....mainly officers as they were expensive but were only made from mild steel ,when hit caused more injury as they broke apart and were band early on in the war, and the design was taken on board by the Portuguese and used in ww1

Many thanks. 

 

3 hours ago, robins2 said:

 

PC200683.JPG

 

 

from a Canadian collection

Thank you. 

8 hours ago, 4thGordons said:

Posting for Ken (New3.2) - his amazing trench mortar collection

IMG_7288.jpg.a27f785546665b1b95067176570a1ec8.jpg

 

IMG_7289.thumb.jpg.946602f419f339a8726c289f27fe4b30.jpg

 

Very impressive. Thanks for posting. 

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  • 5 months later...

Very good.

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A great display. 

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  • 2 months later...

Dear friends, 

I complete the Grabenpanzer with 2 very rare face protection masks and this is how I am displaying them. 

Regards

D. 

IMG_20190907_220614.jpg

IMG_20190907_220556.jpg

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