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3. (and 4). These may not translate to digital too well...

No they didn't. Oh,well! :(

Dave.

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CROONAERT, Sorry to be naive and ignorant, but where is picture 2 and what is it? I do know it is related to the Franco-Prussian war, but is it a grave? Andy

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CROONAERT, Sorry to be naive and ignorant, but where is picture 2 and what is it? I do know it is related to the Franco-Prussian war, but is it a grave? Andy

Sorry Andy, I did mean to put the locations down, but I was too busy being p***ed off with the way that the last two photos scanned!

Picture 2 was taken in the Ossuary at Bazeilles, near Sedan and is one of the graves that contains an unknown number of Bavarian troops. As you walk into this ossuary (which resembles something out of a Dracula movie - a long corridor lit only by natural light from the ground level windows (which are above head hight when you're inside) leading to an altar with chambers to the left and right as you walk down it), the 4 or 5 chambers to the left (this photo) contain similar sarcophagi to this. The chambers to the right look like a scene from hell! (For those who might not go there, these chambers resemble long forgotten hospital wards with fully clothed (down to the greatcoats,spats and boots) skeletons (some of which still have hair, fingernails and mummified skin!) of French Marines who fell here on 1st September 1870. Respect of the fallen prevented me from photographing this nightmare image).

The other photos, by the way, are of Kemmel Chateau cemetery and the French Ossuary on Mt.Kemmel.

Dave.

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this ossuary (which resembles something out of a Dracula movie - a long corridor lit only by natural light from the ground level windows (which are above head hight when you're inside) leading to an altar

Here's a view taken towards the entrance with back to the altar. French "hospital wards" are on the left of this photo (with locked gates to prevent thefts!!! :( ), German sarcophogi to the right.

Dave.

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Some superb photos here. My thanks to everyone for sharing them.

My personal favourite has to be Aurel's 'cloudburst' shot .... wow!

Here is a view taken in Potijze Chateau Wood.

Marc

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Great picture. Marc, and very original to take the photo from the side.

I agree with you that Aurel's 'Cloudburst Picture' deserves a prize. One never ceases to wonder at this man's many talents. He has one advantage over us, however: he lives there amidst the cemeteries!

Fred

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I would like to enter one, which I took of Tyne Cot in June this year.

John

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Hello Fred from Holland !

Your flattery will get you nowhere ! Yet, on the other hand, coming from a Dutchman - and we all know that the Dutch are notorious for their thriftiness - maybe a compliment is something to be cherished ... ;)

John,

Your Tyne Cot Cemetery reminded me ... Two weeks ago I was there, after someone (in the UK) had asked me to take a photo of a name on one of the panels. Standing there, looking up at the name approx. 8 or 9 feet high, with my not very powerful and non-optical small zoom, I felt helpless. (And wondered why none of the locals there had the brilliant idea of renting ladders. Would make a nice profit, or a lucrative holiday job for a student...)

To make matters worse the sun disappeared behind a cloud, so that I could not even count on the sunbeams casting a on the letters to heighten the contrast and make the names more readable... But then looking to the left in despair I noticed that the clouds blocking the sunshine looked quite nice themselves. And together with the geometrical lines of the back wall of Tyne Cot Cemetery I was tempted to take a photo or two. One of them below.

Something else, reminded of it by the (huge) poppies on your photo... And this is a sort of challenge for other members. Can any of the Forum photographers let me know if they ever took a picture in the Ypres Salient of a poppy (a common one) ON or BEFORE 3 May ? I have often challenged my friends and acquaintances to let me know if they spotted one on or before that date. (So far : only one single lonely poppy, miles away...)

The reason I want to know ? I have always been puzzled by John McCrae's "In Flanders fields the poppies blow...", written on 3 May 1915. (In Boezinge, now Ypres.)

(And anticipating a load of indignant replies, accusing me of disrespectful scepticism : yes, I do know that poppies bloom in huge masses when the ground has been churned up (by shelling), but do they also bloom sooner than normal ? (In Ypres now from mid May (at the earliest) until end of July)

Aurel

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This is one of these threads which pops up at irregular intervals on the forum. I can only say that it is a thread where one can spend a lot of time - you can admire the pictures, wonder at the weather and be envious of and happy for someone at the same time.

Envious that I didn't take the picture .. and happy that someone did capture 'that' moment so well.

It's been said before , worthy of a book. Or maybe even a 're-threading' with all the pictures and simple captions, dates and the photographer's feelings about the subject and their picture.

To John W - What a typically 'British' village scene. I loved it. Pity about the white car! Get back there on a Sunday morning about 7.30am and take the same picture from the same angle minus car! Your forum needs you!!! :D

Best wishes Des

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This is one of these threads which pops up at irregular intervals on the forum. I can only say that it is a thread where one can spend a lot of time - you can admire the pictures, wonder at the weather and be envious of and happy for someone at the same time.

Envious that I didn't take the picture .. and happy that someone did capture 'that' moment so well.

It's been said before , worthy of a book. Or maybe even a 're-threading' with all the pictures and simple captions, dates and the photographer's feelings about the subject and their picture.

To John W - What a typically 'British' village scene. I loved it. Pity about the white car! Get back there on a Sunday morning about 7.30am and take the same picture from the same angle minus car! Your forum needs you!!! :D

Best wishes Des

Maybe they all need reposting/compiling in a new section on the Gallery?

Ryan

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Whoa John Reed I think you got the life sized portrait!! Actually great pic! I do like the poppies, they add the extra detail.

I think Salient has a point.... we should compile the photos, from this and other threads into the Gallery. That way they won't be lost.

Chris... what would this idea take to make happen. If its just time and man power, I'd volunteer.

Andy

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I can confirm that the ossuary at Bazeilles is one of the most bizarre places I have ever visited. Your skin starts crawling as you open the door - it is normally locked, but the curator at the 'Dernier Cartouche' museum just up the road will lend the key on a promise to bring it back! once you have paid to visit the museum.

My wife and I gave back the key and then went for a bit of something strong.

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Hi Aurel from Belgium!

Another great picture! Another compliment from a dour Dutchman. It is the photographer that sees the subject as it will come out in a picture just as beauty is in the eye of the beholder. (This is not a negation of the compliment, of course.)

All the best and keep up the good work!

Fred

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  • 5 months later...

It's up not far from Dixmuide, in the Salient. The statues are the grieving parents by Kathe Kollwitz...her son Peter lies under one of the plaques in front of the statues.

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I find them very moving, the facial expressions are chilling.

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