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museumtom

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BottsGreys

Tom:

Thanks for "setting these guys straight" for me. If you could find photos of any of these four men, I would sure like to see.

Garnett W. Brown New York

Charles Schroll 28th Infantry from Pennsylvania

and the 2 you just checked:

Wade H. Jackson West Virginia

Lilleton T. Cordell Maryland

Thanks so much,

Chris

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museumtom

I did my best for ya, went through it twice again There was only one Photo for these four men. Better luck next time.

Sorry

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BottsGreys

Tom:

Thanks again for trying--I'm in your debt for finding the one. The power of the Forum once again--now I have a face to go with the headstone I found just a couple a days ago. Cordell was in the 111th MG Battalion of the 29th (Blue-Gray) Division. My curiosity is aroused as to why he (a Baltimorean) is buried here in eastern West Virginia. Perhaps he was originally from here and was living in Baltimore (75 miles away) when he enlisted. The 29th Division was Maryland and Virginia National Guard.

Regards,

Chris

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Neil Burns

Chris,

I must rush to my state's defense!

Most of the 113th and a good amount of the 114th Infantry were New Jersey National Guard. In fact the majority of troops in the 29th were from Jersey.

I have the 29th's Division History so if you need anything looked into, just ask.

Take care,

Neil

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BottsGreys

Neil:

Arrrgh!!! You are correct--I, of course, was erroneously thinking about the reorganized 29th of WWII.

Chris :o

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Neil Burns

Hi Chris,

I checked the 29th's History Cpl. L.T. Cordell Co. A 110th Machine Gun Battalion KIA Ocotber 23, 1918.

The 29th were beginning their attack of the Etrayes Ridge and around 4 AM the Germans hit them with a preemptive bombardment with a large amount of gas. Most of the casualties seem to have come from artillery fire/gas.

Take care,

Neil

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BottsGreys

Neil:

Thanks so much. You're a mind reader--after I posted yesterday, I realized I should have used it as an opportunity to take you up on your offer and have you check Cordell in the 29th Division history.

I appreciate your foresight in checking him out for me. I plan on visiting the grave again this week now that I am armed with information/photo.

Chris

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perce620

As War graves rep for my unit have the complete listing for wargraves in Cornwall(covers WWI,WWII,and post war RAF), have to make visits to post war RAF graves, willing to do look ups and photo graves in this area if in graveyards I cover

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kingsman64

Hi Tom

quite new to the forum think its stunning anything on 72101 Sgt Jack s Read 9th Cheshires Died 29/04/1918 please?

Many thanks. ;)

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museumtom

SDGW states that he was an Acting Sargeant while the CWGC says he was a Sargeant. SDGW states he was born in and enlisted in while living in.Bridgport in Dorset. He changed units from the Dorset regiment where his number was 17688. He was killed in action. He is not in De Ruvigneys Roll of honour. The CWGC state;

READ, JACK STEWART

Initials: J S

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Serjeant

Regiment: Cheshire Regiment

Unit Text: 9th Bn.

Age: 20

Date of Death: 29/04/1918

Service No: 72101

Additional information: Son of Mr. and Mrs. G. P. Read, of 32, East St., Bridport, Dorset.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: Panel 61 to 63

Cemetery: TYNE COT MEMORIAL

TYNE COT MEMORIAL

Country: Belgium

Locality: Zonnebeke, West-Vlaanderen

Visiting Information: There are two separate registers for this site - one for the cemetery and one for the memorial. The memorial register will be found in the left hand rotunda of the memorial as you face the memorial. The Panel Numbers quoted at the end of each entry relate to the panels dedicated to the Regiment served with. In some instances where a casualty is recorded as attached to another Regiment, his name may alternatively appear within their Regimental Panels. Please refer to the on-site Memorial Register Introduction to determine the alternative panel numbers if you do not find the name within the quoted Panels. Wheelchair access to the cemetery possible via main entrance. For further information regarding wheelchair access, please contact our Enquiries Section on telephone number: 01628 507200

Location Information: The Tyne Cot Memorial to the Missing forms the north-eastern boundary of Tyne Cot Cemetery, which is located 9 kilometres north east of Ieper town centre, on the Tynecotstraat, a road leading from the Zonnebeekseweg (N332). The names of those from United Kingdom units are inscribed on Panels arranged by Regiment under their respective Ranks. The names of those from New Zealand units are inscribed on panels within the New Zealand Memorial Apse located at the centre of the Memorial.

Historical Information: The Tyne Cot Memorial is one of four memorials to the missing in Belgian Flanders which cover the area known as the Ypres Salient. Broadly speaking, the Salient stretched from Langemarck in the north to the northern edge in Ploegsteert Wood in the south, but it varied in area and shape throughout the war. The Salient was formed during the First Battle of Ypres in October and November 1914, when a small British Expeditionary Force succeeded in securing the town before the onset of winter, pushing the German forces back to the Passchendaele Ridge. The Second Battle of Ypres began in April 1915 when the Germans released poison gas into the Allied lines north of Ypres. This was the first time gas had been used by either side and the violence of the attack forced an Allied withdrawal and a shortening of the line of defence. There was little more significant activity on this front until 1917, when in the Third Battle of Ypres an offensive was mounted by Commonwealth forces to divert German attention from a weakened French front further south. The initial attempt in June to dislodge the Germans from the Messines Ridge was a complete success, but the main assault north-eastward, which began at the end of July, quickly became a dogged struggle against determined opposition and the rapidly deteriorating weather. The campaign finally came to a close in November with the capture of Passchendaele. The German offensive of March 1918 met with some initial success, but was eventually checked and repulsed in a combined effort by the Allies in September. The battles of the Ypres Salient claimed many lives on both sides and it quickly became clear that the commemoration of members of the Commonwealth forces with no known grave would have to be divided between several different sites. The site of the Menin Gate was chosen because of the hundreds of thousands of men who passed through it on their way to the battlefields. It commemorates those of all Commonwealth nations except New Zealand who died in the Salient, in the case of United Kingdom casualties before 16 August 1917. Those United Kingdom and New Zealand servicemen who died after that date are named on the memorial at Tyne Cot, a site which marks the furthest point reached by Commonwealth forces in Belgium until nearly the end of the war. Other New Zealand casualties are commemorated on memorials at Buttes New British Cemetery and Messines Ridge British Cemetery. The TYNE COT MEMORIAL now bears the names of almost 35,000 officers and men whose graves are not known. The memorial, designed by Sir Herbert Baker with sculpture by Joseph Armitage and F V Blundstone, was unveiled by Sir Gilbert Dyett in July 1927. The memorial forms the north-eastern boundary of TYNE COT CEMETERY, which was established around a captured German blockhouse or pill-box used as an advanced dressing station. The original battlefield cemetery of 343 graves was greatly enlarged after the Armistice when remains were brought in from the battlefields of Passchendaele and Langemarck, and from a few small burial grounds. It is now the largest Commonwealth war cemetery in the world in terms of burials. At the suggestion of King George V, who visited the cemetery in 1922, the Cross of Sacrifice was placed on the original large pill-box. There are three other pill-boxes in the cemetery. There are now 11,952 Commonwealth servicemen of the First World War buried or commemorated in Tyne Cot Cemetery. 8,365 of the burials are unidentified but there are special memorials to more than 80 casualties known or believed to be buried among them. Other special memorials commemorate 20 casualties whose graves were destroyed by shell fire. The cemetery was designed by Sir Herbert Baker.

No. of Identified Casualties: 34870

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Chunkeroo

Would you mind looking for:

ALBERT SOULS PRIVATE 2ND WORCESTERSHIRE REGT. M.G. KIA March 14 1916

JOHN VELLENDER PRIVATE 8TH GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGT. KIA 1 July 1916

FRED G. SOULS PRIVATE 16TH CHESHIRE REGT. FRANCE KIA July 19 1916

WALTER D. SOULS PRIVATE 2ND WORCESTERSHIRE REG. M.G. DOW May 27 1916

OLIVER J. PORTER PRIVATE 8TH GLOUCESTERSHIRE REGT. KIA July 21 1916

GARNET MORRIS LANCE CPL. ROYAL WARWICKSHIRE REGT. KIA April 15 1916

THOMAS SPENCER GLOUCESTERSHIRE TERRITORIAL KIA Dec 5 1917

WILFRED H. HENSLEY CAPTAIN 6TH SOMERSETSHIRE L.I. MIA March 21 1918

ARTHUR W. SOULS LANCE CPL. 16TH CHESHIRE REGT. KIA April 25 1918

ALFRED E. SOULS PRIVATE 11TH CHESHIRE REGT. KIA April 10 1918

FRED MASTERS ARMY PRIVATE 10TH ARMY CYCLIST CORPS DIED AFTER DISCHARGE 1916

THOMAS W. BOLTER PRIVATE 11TH. LEICESTERSHIRE REGT. DIED AFTER DISCHARGE 1919

Many thanks

Clare

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museumtom

If you have acess to The CWGC or SDWG just say so................it willsave time. What information do you require?

Tom

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kingsman64

Tom

You are a gent and a scholar!

Many thanks.

:D

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museumtom

I get the impression that this is a list of soldiers from a memorial in Great Rissington.

Albert Souls, No 17208,Born in and lived in Great Rissington, Enlisted in Bourton-on-water,

Formerly 17173 Worcs regt.

Jon Vellender, 8th Service Bn, 2367 Born in and lived in Cold Aston, Glos, enlisted in Slow-on-the-wold. DOW,

Fred Souls, Born in and lived in Great Rissington, enlisted in Slow-on-the-wold. No 21686.

Walter Davies Souls, Born in and lived in Great Rissington, enlisted in Bourton-on-water(sic),No 17209, Formerly No 17177 Worcs regt,

Oliver John Porter, Born in and lived in Great Rissington, enlisted in Bourton-on-the-water, No 13687

Garnet Morris, Born in and lived in Great Rissington,Enlisted in Bourton-on-water, No 242685, Formerly No 17757 Worcs regt,

Thomas Spencer, Born in and lived in Great Rissington,enlisted in Bristol,died, No 202023, 2/4th City of Bristol Battalion, territorial, It says he was KIA on the 3rd of Dec.

Wilfred Henry Hensley Capt,.nothing new to add from SDGW however.hurrah!! we got a hit in De Ruvigneys roll of honour.......finally. Capt Hensley Wilfred Henry, 6th Service Bn, Prince Alberts Somerset Light Infantry, only son of the Rev Henry G Henslet of

Great Rissington Rectory Co Gloucester, rector by his wife Alice Andree. Born Warwick,14 july 1894; educ Warwick SAchool;Bath College#Dean Close School and the Emmanuel College Cambridge, joined the Public Schools battalion. The Royal Fusiliers in sept 1914;served with the Expeditionary Force in France and Flanders from Nov 1915;returned to England in March 1916 and after a period of training at Oxford was gazetted 2nd Lieut july 1916 6th batt The Somerset Light Infantry;promoted Lieut July 1916 and capt Dec 1917;was again wounded near arras 9th April 1917 and invalided home;went back to France in dec and was killed in action north of Moy near St Quentin March 1918. This is the only one of your list I searched De Ruvigneys for.

Albert Souls, No 17208,Born in and lived in Great Rissington, Enlisted in Bourton-on-water,

Formerly 17173 Worcs regt.

Jon Vellender, 8th Service Bn, 2367 Born in and lived in Cold Aston, Glos, enlisted in Slow-on-the-wold. DOW,

Fred Souls, Born in and lived in Great Rissington, enlisted in Slow-on-the-wold. No 21686.

Walter Davies Souls, Born in and lived in Great Rissington, enlisted in Bourton-on-water(sic),No 17209, Formerly No 17177 Worcs regt,

Oliver John Porter, Born in and lived in Great Rissington, enlisted in Bourton-on-the-water, No 13687

Garnet Morris, Born in and lived in Great Rissington,Enlisted in Bourton-on-water, No 242685, Formerly No 17757 Worcs regt,

Thomas Spencer, Born in and lived in Great Rissington,enlisted in Bristol,died, No 202023, 2/4th City of Bristol Battalion, territorial, It says he was KIA on the 3rd of Dec.

Wilfred Henry Hensley Capt,.nothing new to add.

Arthur Souls, Born in and lived in Great Rissington,enlisted in Stow-on-the-wold. No 21683, Won a Military Medals so he did begorrah!!

Alfred Souls, Born in Sherbourne in Glos, lived in Great Rissington,enlisted in Stow-on-the-wold. N0 21525,

Fred Masters.no data.

Thomas Bolter.no data

Look up their burial data on www.cwgc.org/

Tom

Arthur Souls, Born in and lived in Great Rissington,enlisted in Stow-on-the-wold. No 21683, Won a Military Medals so he did begorrah!!

Alfred Souls, Born in Sherbourne in Glos, lived in Great Rissington,enlisted in Stow-on-the-wold. N0 21525,

Fred Masters.no data.

Thomas Bolter.no data

Look up their burial data on www.cwgc.org/

Tom Burnell

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museumtom

I just ran a check in De Ruvigneys Roll of Honour for the rest of the names and there was nothing on them….only information on the Officer posted earlier.

Tom.

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Guest gen_wizard

Hi Tom,

I'm wondering if you are able to tell me where Casuality Clearing Station 6 was in April 1917? I am researching a soldier from the 75th Battalion of the C.E.F. and i think that he died of wounds at this station. Thanks for any help that you are able to give me.

Regards

Mike

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museumtom

The No 6 Stationary was located at PREVENT and the No 6 B.R.C.S was in Etaples at that time.

Tom

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museumtom

I also meant to add that the No 6 CCS was in other places at other times but for this period the only No 6's are the above.

Tom

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Guest gen_wizard

Tom,

Many thanks for that, it helps me track him and where he was fighting roughly when he got hit.

Would you do me a big favour as you have the SDGW cd's? I'm also researching my great uncle Frederick Lelliott of the 1st Battalion Kings Own. There seems to be a bit of difference in the date of his death with CWGC and the place where his Battalion was. I think now that he died in 1915 and not 1916. If you could look up any deaths for that Battalion on the 24th May 1916 and same date but 1915 for me. I need to compare where the deaths were so that i can get the right date for his death. If it does turn out to be 1915 then he died only a few days after his younger brother who was with the 2nd Battalion.

I appreciate the help that you have given me so far and for that i thank you.

Regards

Mike

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museumtom

His rank is down as WO Class 2, born in Chichester and enlisted in Winchester, Won the DCM also, KIA 24/5/15,No 8073

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Guest gen_wizard

Tom,

Many thanks for this imformation. It seems that the CWGC have got the wrong date as his Battalion was down getting ready for 1st July 1916, the Somme. I'll now have to see if i can get the records changed at CWGC. Thanks again Tom.

Regards

Mike

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Chunkeroo

Thanks Tom.

Sorry for taking up your time. The men were all from Great Rissington - my home village. I was just hoping you may have had something I had not seen before. Thanks for the info on Wilf Hensley.

Clare

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kingsman64

Hi tom

I have access to CWGC wondering if you had anything extra please (SDGW or De Ruvignys Roll of Honour) on 2nd Lieut Frederick E Adkin 2nd Royal Sussex. KIA 24/9/18.

Thank you in advance ;)

Paul Dwyer

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museumtom

De Ruvigneys has only one Adkin and it is not your man. SDGW says that he was attached to the 2nd Bn, was a 2lt(TP) and he was Killed in action. Last bit of info is from SDGW it says that he won the Military medal. Officers won the Military Cross so this may mean that he won the Military medal as an OR before being commissioned. So he may have 'risen through the ranks'. His name was Fredrick Edward Adkin

Thats all.

regards.

Tom

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kingsman64

Cheers Tom

Your a Star, If I ever make it over to visit the "old country, the land of my fathers" I will look you up for a liquid lunch!

Bets regards

Paul Dwyer

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