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Coucy Le Chateau May 1917


GROBBY
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Thank you so much for doing this ,It dosnt matter how much you do its brilliant to read any of it . Two days ago I recieved another 24 postcards and there are a couple amongst them that have 3 or 4 from the same person. I shall post another on and if you would like to do it I would be very happy .Thanks again

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Am ready whenever you are for a new card! ;-)

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Feldpost

Fräulein Anna Grundmann

Burkau No. 218

b. Bischofswerda

 

Dresden, d. 21.4.18

Liebe Schwester!

Sende dir auch wieder ein Kärtchen

bin jetzt immer nicht dazugekommen.

Auf der Karte sind meine Rekruten, sind

aber nicht schön getroffen. Haben jetzt

ein . . . .Tage sehr schlechtes Wetter. Da

kann man nicht weit fort, sogar auch

Schnee, wie sieht es dann bei Euch aus?

Mir geht es sonst gut, was ich auch von dir

hoffe. Es grüsst recht herzlich Bruder Richard

 

Dear Sister!

I'll send you another card, haven't gotten around to it yet.

On the front of the card are my recruits, but it's not a good picture.

Now we have . . . . days of bad weather.

One can't go far, there's also snow, how does it look where you are?

I'm doing well otherwise, and hope that you are too.

Kind regards from brother Richard

 

A grandson of Richard Grundmann died in 2017. From his obituary, it seems that the family continued to live at Burkau for decades after the war.

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On that last one does it give Herr Grundmanns rank ? and where posted from . It looks to be under the postmark

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2 hours ago, GROBBY said:

On that last one does it give Herr Grundmanns rank ? and where posted from . It looks to be under the postmark

It looks like Gefr (Gefreiter) on the return address. He writes from Dresden, and the postmark says Dresden too. But I can't make out much under the postmark stamp. The purple stamp (not the postmark) says L. Rekrut Depot, Ers.Abt (possibly Ersatz-Abteilung? replacement division?), Feld-Art. Regt. 12.

 

In the Verlustlisten of 23 August 1916 there is a Richard Grundmann from Burkau, Bautzen. At that time he was attached to Infanterie-Regt 182, 3rd company. I expect this is him, as his grandson was born in Burkau but lived in Bautzen. Anyway, Richard is listed as severely wounded so perhaps he was no longer fit to serve on the front lines and ended up training recruits instead?

 

 

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1 hour ago, knittinganddeath said:

It looks like Gefr (Gefreiter) on the return address. He writes from Dresden, and the postmark says Dresden too. But I can't make out much under the postmark stamp. The purple stamp (not the postmark) says L. Rekrut Depot, Ers.Abt (possibly Ersatz-Abteilung? replacement division?), Feld-Art. Regt. 12.

 

In the Verlustlisten of 23 August 1916 there is a Richard Grundmann from Burkau, Bautzen. At that time he was attached to Infanterie-Regt 182, 3rd company. I expect this is him, as his grandson was born in Burkau but lived in Bautzen. Anyway, Richard is listed as severely wounded so perhaps he was no longer fit to serve on the front lines and ended up training recruits instead?

 

 

Thank you so much for that ,It is such a help. If I can I will see if I can find more on him

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The postcard with the dead horse from Malancourt. He has lovely handwriting and seems homesick.

 

Abs. Alfred Uhlig

N. . . . .  Batt.

c/ . . . .

18. Division 1. Armee

 

An Herrn Franz Garscha jr.

Schuhmacher

Ober Gelenau

Sachsen. Erzgeb[irge]

 

Frankreich den 25. 7

 

Lieber Franz

Ich habe deine Karte mit

grosser Freude erhalten.

Es wär mir lieber ich

könnte auch einmal in

der Bessenschänke gehen.

Hier sind sie alle lehr

und Bier giebt es in der

Höhle auch nicht. Den Hänfling

könnt ihr schon die Krallen

abschneiden. Auch könntest

du einmal zu mir kommen

zum Schafkopf spielen.

Viele Grüsse send. Alfred.

 

 

Sender: Alfred Uhlig

. . . .

18th Division, 1st Army

 

The rectangular stamp says:

5 K.S. Armierungsbataillon Nr. 25

3. Komp.

Soldatenbrief (soldier letter)

 

To: Mr Franz Garscha Jr.

Shoemaker

Ober Gelenau, Sachsen Erzgebirge

 

France, 25.7

Dear Franz

It was with great pleasure that I received your card. I wish that I could go to the Bessenschänke (1) again. Here they are all empty and there is no beer in the cave (2) either. You guys can cut the claws of the linnet now. You could also come to visit me and play Schafkopf (3). Many greetings from Alfred.

 

(1) A Besenwirtschaft or Besenschänke is "a temporary pub set up by the vintner to sell the wine they produce themselves; you will also find a menu of local home cooked foods." So this could mean something quite general. In Gelenau, there is a guesthouse/restaurant called the Besenschänke that has existed since 1893...

 

(2) Höhle literally means cave -- here I think it could refer to trenches or underground living quarters (like the tunnels at Mont Cornillet or Winterberg?).

 

(3) Schafkopf is a card game popular in the south of Germany.

 

I don't really understand the part about the linnet and the claws. Originally I wondered if it was some kind of metaphor but the rest of the card seems extremely literal. So maybe I read it wrong.

 

 

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Thank you for doing this .Its all different from the english .By the way if Richard Grundmann was in the 182nd Infantry Regiment in 1914 he would have taken part in the Battle of Dimant in which 647 civilians were killed .I hope he joined well after that date. It looks like he was wounded in the Battle of the Somme .B Y 1918 he looks like he has been through it .I noticed a couple of the recruits have Iron Cross Medals so they are not new boys .Thanks again 

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21 minutes ago, knittinganddeath said:

The postcard with the dead horse from Malancourt. He has lovely handwriting and seems homesick.

 

Abs. Alfred Uhlig

N. . . . .  Batt.

c/ . . . .

18. Division 1. Armee

 

An Herrn Franz Garscha jr.

Schuhmacher

Ober Gelenau

Sachsen. Erzgeb[irge]

 

Frankreich den 25. 7

 

Lieber Franz

Ich habe deine Karte mit

grosser Freude erhalten.

Es wär mir lieber ich

könnte auch einmal in

der Bessenschänke gehen.

Hier sind sie alle lehr

und Bier giebt es in der

Höhle auch nicht. Den Hänfling

könnt ihr schon die Krallen

abschneiden. Auch könntest

du einmal zu mir kommen

zum Schafkopf spielen.

Viele Grüsse send. Alfred.

 

 

Sender: Alfred Uhlig

. . . .

18th Division, 1st Army

 

The rectangular stamp says:

5 K.S. Armierungsbataillon Nr. 25

3. Komp.

Soldatenbrief (soldier letter)

 

To: Mr Franz Garscha Jr.

Shoemaker

Ober Gelenau, Sachsen Erzgebirge

 

France, 25.7

Dear Franz

It was with great pleasure that I received your card. I wish that I could go to the Bessenschänke (1) again. Here they are all empty and there is no beer in the cave (2) either. You guys can cut the claws of the linnet now. You could also come to visit me and play Schafkopf (3). Many greetings from Alfred.

 

(1) A Besenwirtschaft or Besenschänke is "a temporary pub set up by the vintner to sell the wine they produce themselves; you will also find a menu of local home cooked foods." So this could mean something quite general. In Gelenau, there is a guesthouse/restaurant called the Besenschänke that has existed since 1893...

 

(2) Höhle literally means cave -- here I think it could refer to trenches or underground living quarters (like the tunnels at Mont Cornillet or Winterberg?).

 

(3) Schafkopf is a card game popular in the south of Germany.

 

I don't really understand the part about the linnet and the claws. Originally I wondered if it was some kind of metaphor but the rest of the card seems extremely literal. So maybe I read it wrong.

 

 

 

img001 (4).jpg

img001.pdf

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The message starts on the back but then finishes on the front. The caption on the front indicates the castle is used as an officers' casino.

The purple stamp says something with 37. . .Ersatz-Brigade Bataillon 4. Kompagnie.

 

Abs. Res. Bordfeld

Art. Mun. Kol. No. 168

X. Ers. Div. Westen

 

Herrn Pastor . . . .

Hochehrwürden

Ohrum

bei Hedwigsburg

Kreis Wolfenbüttel

Braunschweig

 

Westen, 1. August 1915

Lieber Herr Pastor! Sende Ihnen

und Ihren werten Familie herz-

liche Grüsse von fremder Erde. Mir

geht es, Gott sei Dank, noch immer

ganz gut. Wie geht es Ihnen denn

noch immer. Hoffendlich doch recht

gut. Wer hätte das wohl gedacht,

 

[continues on the front]

dass der Krieg so lange dauern würde.

Heute am Jahrestage ist es wohl die Bitte eines jeden Gott

gebe uns bald einen siegreichen Friede! In der Hoff

nung auf ein frohes Wiedersehen verbleibe ich in

dankbarer Erinnerung. Ihr Albert Bordfeld

 

From Reservist Bordfeld

Artillerie Munitions-Kolonne No. 168

X. Division, Western Front

 

To: Pastor . . .

Reverend

Ohrum near Hedwigsburg, Wolfenbüttel district, Braunschweig

 

Dear Pastor! Sending you and your worthy family kind regards from foreign soil. I am, thank God, still doing well. How are you doing then? Hopefully very well. Who would have thought that the war would last so long. Today on the anniversary [of the start of the war] it is probably everyone's plea that God soon give us a victorious peace! In hope of a happy reunion, I remain in grateful memory, your Albert Bordfeld.

 

Edited by knittinganddeath
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Re: the Feldbäckerei postcard from Rudolf Wagner. I just noticed that his pen has given him a lot of trouble. He has either overloaded it with ink or he is using an inferior writing instrument. There are ink blots in the address field and his return address/name were written with too much ink (it's fuzzy and very thick). The problem seems to plagued him throughout the short message as lots of letters have unequal "weight" to them.

 

He talks about the "terrible cold" so I wonder if his ink might have frozen.

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It could be the ink very cold or even that it was in a dark dugout written with candlelight .I should think it was hard to get hold of ink or pens which is why a lot of the ones I have are in pencil .A shame for you as they will be hard to read .Thanks again for translating .Was any of the others I put in the message any good for your article ?

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1 hour ago, GROBBY said:

hard to get hold of ink or pens which is why a lot of the ones I have are in pencil

That was my next thought as soon as I realized how much trouble Rudolf's pen seemed to be. I like to think that I'm getting slowly better at the ones in pencil.

 

Anyway, here is the one from the Münzetheater in Brussels. Coincidentally, I did most of it on the 29th -- exactly 104 years to the day that it's postmarked.

 

Abs. Gefr. Herrmann

Regts. Stab IR 93

 

Feldpost

Herrn

Arthur Fentz-L.?

Dessau i/Anhalt

Turmstrasse 30

 

Lieber Arthur!

Teile dir mit, dass ich gesund

und munter wieder in Franzo

siner? angelangt bin. Es kann

mir aber gar nicht behagen.

Zu Haus war es doch schöner.

Ach, wenn es doch erst ein Ende

nehmen wollte. Das Wetter

ist auch nicht vom besten.

Sonst ist noch alles beim alten

die ettliche? Schiesserei genau noch

so wie vorher.

Nun sei du, deinen lieben Eltern

und Geschwister recht herzlich gegrüsst

und an deinen Schwagen . . . . .

 

Sender: Gefreiter Herrmann

Regiments-Stab IR 93

 

Fieldpost

To: Mr Arthur Fentz-L.?

Dessau in Anhalt

Turmstrasse 30

 

Dear Arthur,

Letting you know that I am healthy and cheerful and have arrived in France (among the French?) again. However, it can't appeal to me. It was nicer at home. Oh, if only there would be an end to this all. The weather isn't the best. Otherwise everything is like it's always been. The many shootouts just as they were before. Warm greetings to you, your dear parents and siblings, and to your in-laws. . . . .

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Thank you for doing that .I looks like his second trip to france and by 1917 they all have had enough of the war .Heres one you might like

img003 (4).jpg

img001.pdf

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Great picture. I can imagine that he thought his sister would get a kick out of a man doing women's work.

 

An

Fräulein Emma Kilian

Ölsnitz i/V[ogtland]

Walkmühle

 

2. E. . . . . der

L.M.T. den 4. Nov? 1915

 

Liebes Schwesterchen!

Ich schrieb dir kürzlich eine

Karte. Mir geht's immer noch gut!

Dir auch? Sind die garstigen Zahn

schmerzen fort? Habe vielen

Dank für das fleissige Besor

gen meiner Paketchen! Wirst

sie denn leicht los? Viele

herzliche Grüsse von deinem Br. Walter.

 

Upside down between the lines on the top he has written the following:

Ist das kleine Böckchen schon so gross wie die anderen Ziegen?

 

On the side he has written:

Liebe Grüsse an Papa, Mama, u. Elsa!

 

To: Miss Emma Kilian

Ölsnitz in Vogtland

Walkmühle [probably Walkmühlen-Häuser in Ölsnitz]

 

2. F. . . . of the Leicht-Munitions-Truppe? 192, 4 Nov? 1915

 

Dear little sister! I wrote you a card recently. I'm still doing well! What about you? Are the nasty toothaches gone? Thank you very much for the diligent procuring of my parcels! Is it easy to get rid of them [maybe: is it easy to send them]? Many warm greetings from your brother Walter.

 

Upside down between the lines:

Is the little goat buck already as big as the other goats?

 

On the side:

Greetings to Papa, Mama, and Elsa!

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Thank you Its great to read the normality in these postcards ( toothaches and little goats ) Another card thats not dammage or war

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img001.pdf

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Schützengraben-Idyll - Trench Idyll (VERY IRONIC IN MY OPINION)

 

Abs. . . .. And. Bernard

6. Komp RIR 133

24/2 Div XII K: Armee Korps

 

An

Klara Bernard

Leipzig-Schonefeld

DImpfelstr. 28 II

 

11.8.15

Du liebes böses Du

Es ist Doch gar nicht wahr dass ich

Dir böse bin so habe ich Doch gar

nich geschrieben Du kleines Dummen

Du warst? mich Doch . . . hen . . . wird?

Mir geht es noch gut was auch von

Dir mein süsser Liebling hoffe und

J?. . . . . auch. War gestern . . .

. . . . beim Zahnartzt und bei Finke

gegessen. . . . Brief . . .

und viele süsse herz. . . . Kusse

für Dich und . . . Dein lieber

braver Andreas. Auf Wiedersehen

 

His writing is very hard to read (a mix of Sütterlin and Roman), and I don't think I can get anything better than this -- sorry. Someone with better German might be able to guess the words more easily.

 

Dated 11.8.1915, he is either confused about the date or extremely delayed in posting it as the postmark is from 12.9.1915.

 

Sender: And[reas] Bernard

6. Komp RIR 133

24/2 Div XII K: Armee Korps

 

To: Klara Bernard

 

You dear little naughty one, It is not true that I'm mean/bad to you I didn't write that to you at all you stupid little one. You were. . . . . I'm still doing well, which I hope is also true of you and J . . ., my sweet darling. Yesterday I was . . . . at the dentist and ate at Finke's . . . . letter . . . . and many sweet kisses for you and . . . . Your darling well-behaved Andreas. Goodbye. 

 

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Thank you for that .I hope that is his wife . Could you please do this one I know this could be difficult but he looks such a stern chap and interesting. The other has beutifull writing but im not sure if it is militaryimg003.pdf

img001 (4).jpg

img001.pdf img002.pdf

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This was a great card! He was not very happy with his likeness, though ;-)

 

Abs

Hennig, F.I.R. 48. 3. Ers. Batt.

 

An

Gefr. d. Landw.

Martin Hennig

Pirna

F.I.R. 64 I. Ers. Batt.

 

6.II.1915

Lieber Bruder!

Herz. Dank für deine

liebe Briefe. Ich bin

froh, dasz diese Krank

heit nicht allzu ernst

ist. Die Aufnahme ist

nicht gut geworden aber

es ist nicht mehr zu

ändern. Dienst

ist stramm aber mir

gefällt es. Gestern

Scharfschützen mit

Mauserpistolen.

Baldige Besserung.

Frohes Wiedersehen

dein Albert

 

From: Albert Hennig, F.I.R. 48. 3. Ers. Batt.

 

To: Gefreiter of the Landwehr Martin Hennig, Pirna, F.I.R. 64 I. Ers. Batt.

 

6 February 1915

Dear Brother!

Thank you very much for your dear letters. I'm glad that this illness [of yours] isn't too serious. The picture didn't turn out well but it can't be changed. Service [in the army] is strict, but I like it. Yesterday sharpshooting with Mauser pistols. Get well soon. To a happy reunion. Yours, Albert

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The letter seems quite scolding, he seems to not want the shirt that they have sent him but his sister insists that he must keep it. He is injured and at the Vereins-Lazarett in Königslutter. He was listed as missing in the Verlustlisten of 3 December 1914, so at least he has been found and accounted for. According to Verlustlisten he belonged to IR 142, 4th company.

 

Abs

Maria Beising

Mühlhausen . . .ngen

 

An

Musketier

Josef Beising

im Vereins-Lazarett

Königslutter, Braunschweig

 

Mühlhausen, 11. April 1915

 

Lieber Bruder!

 

Haben im Brief noch etwas

vergessen was noch notwendig

ist. Du meinst du würdest

uns das Hemd wieder zurück

schicken. Darüber wären wir

noch böse über dich. Wir schicken

es dir ja zum anziehen.

Wir bitten dich, das Hemd

nicht mehr zurückschicken.

Es braucht dich gewiss nicht

raum. Dann hast du doch etwas

rechtes zum anziehen.

 

Auf baldiges Wiedersehen

Es grüsst dich

deine Schwester Maria

 

From Maria Beising, Mühlhausen

 

To Musketier Josef Beising, Vereins-Lazarett

Königslutter, Braunschweig

 

Mühlhausen, 11 April 1915.

[Postmarked Konstanz-Offenburg 12.4]

 

Dear Brother!

We forgot something in the letter that is still important. You said that you would send the shirt back to us. That would make us angry at you. We are sending it for you to wear. We ask you to not send the shirt back anymore. It doesn't take up any space [for you]. Then you will have something fitting to wear. See you soon. Greetings from your sister Maria

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Thank you for doing this .Those 2 were very interesting .Its nice to see a bit of family sqauble going on it makes it human and I dont think anyone likes their likeness in photos well I dont anyway. These are 2 groups if you would please

img001 (5).jpg

img003 (3).jpg

img001.pdf img002.pdf

I have just noticed There is only one man without a moustache

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On 27/03/2021 at 18:58, knittinganddeath said:

L. Rekrut Depot, Ers.Abt (possibly Ersatz-Abteilung? replacement division?), Feld-Art. Regt. 12.

 

 

On 27/03/2021 at 22:48, GROBBY said:

noticed a couple of the recruits have Iron Cross Medals so they are not new boys

 

Re: the postcard from Richard Grundmann. I was wondering why there would be recruits with Iron Crosses, and finally found an answer in Lyder Ramstad's book "With the Germans at the Western Front." He was a Norwegian volunteer in the German army, and he talks about being sent to officers' school. Here, he says, they were all officer candidates who had been at the front for a year or even two years. Most of them had more experience and decorations than their teachers, but "we were still dressed down as if we were the rawest of recruits."

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  • Michelle Young changed the title to Coucy Le Chateau May 1917

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