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Marilyne

Women buried on the Western Front - a complete overview

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frev
12 hours ago, Marilyne said:

Sister Ethel Blundell Radcliffe was born in India in 1874. At some point her parents moved to Jersey, presumably when she was still a child. She joined Queen Alexandra's Imperial Nursinv Service and died of broncho-pneumonia follwoing influenza on the 10th march 1919, aged 45. this leads me to think that she must have been a professional nurse even before the war. I might be wrong of course, but I'd like to picture her as an example of efficiency following a lifelong experience.

 

Anyway, if anybody out there on the forum has some information on these ladies, I'll be very grateful.

 

 

Ethel Blundell Radcliffe trained in the London Hospital, receiving her Certificate in 1910 – her registration address was The Lyth, Ellesmere, Salop [Register of Nurses – Royal College of Nursing]

 

She had received her qualification as a Midwife in Feb 1904 at Queen Charlotte’s Hospital – her address: Sea Cliff, Gorey, Jersey [Midwives Roll, 1905]

 

She was actually born on the 28/12/1873 – by October 1876 the family was living in Beckenham, Kent, where her younger sister Catherine was born

 

Probate record 1921:

RADCLIFFE Ethel Blundell of The Nightingale Home East London South Africa spinster died 10 March 1919 in France Probate London 6 August to the reverend Conrad William Curling Finzel clerk.  Effects £3308 14s. 9d.

 

Her service record can be obtained here - if you ever become as obsessed with these ladies (as I have with our Australian QAs!)

http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C10799646

 

 

Cheers, Frev

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Marilyne

The third woman lying in Sangatte is Forewoman Cora Cornish Ball. Quite the heroin in her hometown of Truro, Cornwall, she was born in 1896 in a village called Kenwyn. Her father had various jobs and they moved round the area but through all this, Cora continued to go to school until she was 14. in 1917, just aged 21 years, she volunteered for service in the Woman's Army Auxiliary Corps. She was sent to France and worked in the area of Calais, getting her rank of forewoman (equivalent to army sergeant) probably because she had more education, having stayed in school so long. For her work, she was awarded the Victory medal and the British War Medal. She died 13 days after the Armistice, on the 24th November, probably another casualty of the flu epidemic.

961061915_CoraCornishBall.jpg.0bd89581ef8584126308eaa1b195237a.jpg

988005120_CoraBall.JPG.a59b8e333dc92168745558273609c89d.JPG

 

Next week I'm off to Godewaersvelde... sounds flemish, but is in France.

 

Until then...

 

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Jim Strawbridge
On 14/10/2018 at 12:25, Marilyne said:

 

Note please that I HAVE found and read the controversy on this picture, which might (or not) be her ... I guess we will never know for sure.

 

92554673_Elsiegladstone.jpg.a836e0d03f196b4651da52c2d3073453.jpg

 

 

I have four different photographs of Elsie Gladstone one of which is in a Guy's Hospital Report (obituary) of 1922. If the 1922 Report had the wrong photograph I am sure that it would have been flagged then by those who knew her. Three of the photographs are of the same woman and a fourth is a woman wearing a Red Cross uniform which I am sure is where the error has crept in. I have not found Marilyne's source but be assured that the one above is correct.

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nigelcave

Well, the ones I have in mind are French, but ...

 

Some years back I was at Rocquigny-Equancourt British Cemetery and noted in the register a list of French civilian casualties that had been buried there, complete with Row etc numbers. When I investigated there was an obviously empty row but no headstone of any type. I happened to know the DG of the CWGC at the time and asked how come, given that names and locations were known in the cemetery. Back the reply came that the French provided the headstones and he would have another go at seeing if they could get the situation rectified, which they did and there is now a line of French crosses in the cemetery. It is a fair bet that there must be a woman or two in there (possibly even a child?) - I have not checked. I know that they were not British/Empire/Dominion, nor were they combatants, but they are in a CWGC cemetery ...

 

 

Edited by nigelcave

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Jim Strawbridge
20 hours ago, nigelcave said:

Well, the ones I have in mind are French, but ...

 

Some years back I was at Rocquigny-Equancourt British Cemetery and noted in the register a list of French civilian casualties that had been buried there, complete with Row etc numbers. When I investigated there was an obviously empty row but no headstone of any type. I happened to know the DG of the CWGC at the time and asked how come, given that names and locations were known in the cemetery. Back the reply came that the French provided the headstones and he would have another go at seeing if they could get the situation rectified, which they did and there is now a line of French crosses in the cemetery. It is a fair bet that there must be a woman or two in there (possibly even a child?) - I have not checked. I know that they were not British/Empire/Dominion, nor were they combatants, but they are in a CWGC cemetery ...

 

 

 

Female foreign national whose grave is under CWGC care. In the plot are seven graves (A.1 Sussanne Renard, A.2 Maurice Rollard (assumed to be male), A.3 Germaine Gabet, A.4 no grave – records show that Roslaie Dupont (some sources say Dupuet) should be buried here but the grave has been found to be empty, A.5 Marguerite Hainaut, A.6 Marie Dumoulin, A.7 Asselle Gulles, A.8 no grave - the previous occupant (Mde Levetez) removed to Pys Communal Cemetery, A.9 Marie Joveniau), A.10 no grave – all French citizens.

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Marilyne

Hi all, 

 

yesterday I took advantage of my trip to Ypres to go to see Jouney's End to hop over to Godewaersvelde ... which, despite the name, is in France. Situated just at the foot of the Mont des Cats, it is a hospital cemetery, created in July 1917n the 37th, 41st and 11th CCS used it as a burial place. There are a few German burials in the cemetery and one nurse: Sister Elise KEMP. 

Elise Margaret Kemp was born in Wellington, New Zealand in 1881, the third of six children born to Dr. William George Kemp, a physician and surgeon, and his wife, Charlotte (née Greenwood). Kemp's father was from Alnwick, Northumberland. He took a job at Nelson Hospital where he met his wife Charlotte, the daughter of a Dr John Danford Greenwood (American, probably a colleague or a teacher??) moved to Wellington as a surgeon and eventually ended up New Zealand’s chief Medical Officer.  

 By 1901 – Elise was 7 - the family had relocated to London, living in West Dulwich. Kemp attended the Church High School in Streatham followed by a finishing school in Brussels (There was one in Koekelberg Chateau at the time I think…)  

 Kemp entered nursing school at King's College Hospital in October 1904, at the age of 23. She graduated on 12 February 1908, and began working as a Ward Sister at the Albert and Victoria male surgical wards. She was described as "A very capable nurse, bright, intelligent, and very nice manners, better surgical than medical nurse... " 

Around 1909, her parents moved to Hastings. 

 In 1914 she was called up for military service and became a member of the London-based Territorial Forces Nursing Service (TFNS). In January 1916 she was posted to the Western Front. Two of her brothers who were also doctors joined up with the Royal Medical Corps and went overseas.

In January 1916 Sister Kemp was posted to the Western Front, attached to the 58 CCS (also known as the West Riding CCS) and stationed at Lillers. However, due to the incoming wounded from the Battle of Passchendaele, she was temporarily attached to 37 CCS in Godewaersvelde. In the evening of the 20th October 1917, the CCS was bombed by enemy aircraft and Kemp, three orderlies and three patients were killed.

On November 3, 1917, the British Journal of Nursing recorded her death as follows:

OUR ROLL OF HONOUR. "Great sorrow has been caused at King's College Hospital, Denmark Hill, by the news of the death of Sister Elise M. Kemp, of the Territorial Force Nursing Service. Sister Kemp, who was trained at King's College Hospital, and afterwards promoted to the position of Sister, was a great favorite with her colleagues, both at home and abroad. At the time of her death she was working at a Casualty Clearing Station in France, where she was killed instantaneously by the explosion of a bomb. We offer our sincere sympathy to her parents, Dr. and Mrs. Kemp, of Hastings, in their bereavement."

 

Today, Elise lies at the far end of her row, next to the little terrace upon which are erected the stone and the cross. I thought this would make an interesting picture. 

 

747910588_SisterEliseKemp_jpeg.jpg.b7a6dc24f7e6d308c7d30ba8255d9f55.jpg

 

D94A0972.JPG.e48fa31e553199d675cc5060372cb158.JPG

 

The next visits will take place in November. 

 

Until then... 

 

Marilyne

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Male VAD

So does anyone have an total number or are we still at the near guess stage ??

 

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Marilyne
On 26/10/2018 at 14:45, Male VAD said:

So does anyone have an total number or are we still at the near guess stage ??

 

 

I've got the numbers... 2 in Belgium and 121 in France... but not absolutely sure... 

 

M.

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Terry_Reeves

There are 20 buried in Etaples Military Cemetery including Bertha Gavin "Betty" Stevenson of the YMCA known as The Happy Warrior after the inscription on her headstone.

 

https://www.royalmint.com/discover/uk-coins/first-world-war/personal-stories/betty-stevenson--the-happy-warrior/

 

https://livesofthefirstworldwar.org/lifestory/4966632

 

TR

Edited by Terry_Reeves

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healdav

A German officer and a nurse are buried in the same grave at Longuyon.

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AOK4
12 minutes ago, healdav said:

A German officer and a nurse are buried in the same grave at Longuyon.

 

Do you mean that they are on the same headstone? That doesn't mean they are buried in the same grave...

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Marilyne
19 hours ago, healdav said:

A German officer and a nurse are buried in the same grave at Longuyon.

Thanks for the info. 

German cemeteries are not on my list for the moment... maybe another project once this one is done. 

 

M.

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PaulC78

Worth mentioning Mary Stuart Flynn Gartside-Tipping, who was shot in 1917 while attached to the French Red Cross. There's a topic about her here:

 

 

Although her case was rejected by the CWGC, she does have a headstone in their care. She is buried at Vauxbuin French National Cemetery:

 

https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/169034506/mary-stuart-gartside-tipping

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Marilyne

Hi all, 

 

So I took advantage of my little "Dynasty-Day" outing to visit some more of the women on the Western Front and my first stop on the 16th November was Lillers Communal Cemetery Extension, where Sister Ellen Andrews lies. 

For the next info I owe many thanks to forum pal Dave!! I owe you  a couple of Belgian Beers!!! 

 

Ellen Andrews was born somewhere in 1896 and baptised on the 21st November in the little town of Wrawby. She had two brothers. Her father Frederick died in 1890, leaving his wife Hanna tending to the three children until she remarried when Ellen was 18. But that marriage also ended shortly after: Hanna was to be a two-times widow. Ellen trained as a nurse and started working in Leicester by 1911.

When the war broke out, she joined the Territorial Forces Nursing Services, earning recognition at Nb 5 General Hospital in Leicester tending as a “very good and capable staff nurse who on being promoted to be sister showed her ability to manage her ward well”.

Having requested overseas duty, Ellen Andrews reported to 59th General Hospital in St Omer on the 14th July 1917. A report dating 11th October of that year gives her a very good evaluation and considers her more than capable for duties in a CCS, so more at the front line. Somewhere around the end of the year she was posted to 58thCCS at Lillers (that was the CCS from which Elise Kemp was dispatched to 37thCCS… have they crossed paths at a time? One wonders… ).

On the 21st March 1918, the day the German Spring Offensive started, the town of Lillers and the surroundings of the CCS were bombed by German Taube aircrafts. Ellen and three of her colleagues were making their way back from the accommodation of the nurses back to the CCS when a bomb hit a train on the railway they were crossing. The Sister in charge and Ellen were both gravely wounded but Ellen was not to make it, despite the efforts of her colleagues.

The diary of a Staffordshire Regt soldier tells the story:

21st Thursday/23rd Saturday

Myself included in a party of 18 B Sect march to Lillers for temporary attached Duty with No. 58 C.C.S. The place bombed at night and the Station by Hospital also one train of ammunition blown up, and fired. Shells blown all over the town and into Hospital. Many casualties. Nurse killed and Matron badly wounded. We turned out in Stretcher Squads to the scene, the bombing continued for hours.

 

That day the Germans attacked not only Lillers by air, but also hit Wimereux, St Pol and Boulogne

The diary of the Matron in Chief also mentions the incidents and she went down to 58thCCS herself in the next days. Dr Harvey Cushing, visiting Lillers on the 10th April also mentions the attack in his diary: The last time a Taube came---not long before our arrival---he got an ammunition train or rather a large cache of alcohol near by, which set the train on fire 32 trucks of 9.5's, and as the siding is only a hundred yards from No. 58, things were lively for a while, unexploded as well as exploded shells dropping all over the place, and one sister was killed.

 

On the 27th march, Ellen’s mother was informed of her daughter’s death and then started a very long and winding administrative road for Hanna to get the effects and the pay and gratuity owed to Ellen back. The question was raised whether Ellen had a will drawn up before going out to France, a question to which the matron of Leicester’s hospital answered that “perhaps her fiancé knows something about them”… this is the only indication that Ellen had a sweetheart. Who was he? Did he survive the war? No idea!

In the end, having died without a will, Ellen’s money was divided in three equal parts going to her mother and her two brothers, who both survived the war.

977926144_EllesAndrewsIWM.jpg.556eead8505f7ba411cbb7f62f7df6a2.jpg

 

Interesting fact is that Ellen’s father called himself Andrew (without S) but Ellen Andrews – with S, and was so mentioned on all of her service records. The CWGC database and certificate lists her as Ellen Andrews, as does the burial return dated 11/6/18 of Lillers Communal Cemetery. But her headstone is marked ANDREW…

DSC01356.JPG.3c90f8d8da5178bbc8b121b1e1f1061b.JPG

Ellen Andrews also has her name on the walkway around Lochnagar crater… I’ll have to find it when going back there next time.

 

The next stop on the tour was Longuenesse... 

 

M; 

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Marilyne

As promised here the rest of the visits of the Dynasty day tour.

The second stop was at Longuenesse (Souvenir) Cemetery, at St Omer. There are 6 women there as recorded in the CWGC database and two non war graves. I honestly admit I found the two last ones only because they are on the same row as the nurses...

1661109958_IWMQ108207-30sep17nurses.jpg.1b66ef05defeb8c84cd8e360ee962c3f.jpg

2102232315_Sadnursesrow.JPG.d8287c3c6cbc327b128778128904e993.JPG

 

The most known women in Longuenesse are Agnes Murdoch CLIMIE, Daisy COLES, Elizabeth THOMSON and Mabel Lee MILNE. they all died as a result of an raid on 58th (Scottish) General Hospital in St Omer on the 30th September 1917.

I tried to capture the same picture as that on archives at the IWM. Of course the graves behind the row of nurses weren't there then because they are WWII

 

Chris Baker has a very good account of the raids of September on his site The Long Long Trail, so I won't spend more time on that.

 

Important are the girls, starting with Daisy Coles.

1900651369_DaisyColes.png.139e277022c4f27a13b952e26165c5ae.png

Daisy Kathleen Mary Coles was born in Scotland, the daughter of Mr and Mrs Walter Coles of Priorsford House, Peebles. She went to school at George Watson’s Ladies College.

In September of 1914, Daisy, joined the Voluntary Aid Detachment and started work at the 2nd Scottish General Hospital.  In 1917 the hospital sent a detachment to St Omer as the 58 (Scottish) General Hospital. Daisy Coles was one of them.

interesting information is that Daisy had a brother:

Captain Lionel Coles was a platoon leader in the 16th Bn Royal Scots, also known as McRae’s Battalion. On the 1st July 1916, he went over the top on the Somme, being killed before Contalmaison around 11 in the morning. He is buried at Gordon Dump Cemetery, grave V.E.5.

Lionel was engaged at the time to nurse Dorothy Agnes Yeaman and had given her a locket with his picture in it. Dorothy found her husband in 1918, and in the 80’s, Jane Brown, cleaning up the house of her grandparents, found the locket and slowly started to piece together the story.

 

918448972_DaisyColestomb.JPG.27dec9dfb7880c9fed218cdbd1bbbb0e.JPG

 

A second nurse killed in the raid was Elizabeth Thomson.

Of her not much is known except that she was from Kirkcudbright and was 25years old when she died.

If anyone has information on her to share... that'd be most welcome.

 

I have one picture to make to make the story of Agnes Climie and Mabel Lee Milne complete... tomorrow... you'll understand why.

until then...

 

M.

Elizabeth Thompson.JPG

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Fattyowls

Excellent work Marilyne. Looking forward to the next installment.

 

Pete.

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Marilyne

The two other casualties of the 30/9 bombing were Daisy Coles and Mabel Lee Milne.

 

I own thanks to our pal DoubleD for the info he gave me on Sister Milne. He also sent me some pictures of the visit he made and I'm happy to report that the little scottish flag and the pebble that his visiting party laid at the grave are still there, as you can see on the pictures.

Mabel Lee Milne was born in Dundee on January 8 1886, the eldest daughter of James Mitchell Milne, a district traffic agent for Caledonian and West Coast Railway, and his wife Mary.

In 1901 Mabel was living at Craigie Road, Perth. She had an elder brother, George and a younger sister: Maggie.

On May 29 1917, a 31-year-old Mabel started work as a staff nurse at the 58th (Scottish) General Hospital in France.

Mabel did not die immediately after the attack. She as severely wounded and the staff of the hospital did all they could to save her, but the injuries were too extensive and she died two days later, on the 2nd October.

1922883530_MabelLeeMilne.jpg.8acc5d71bc44a898401983d312ff68b4.jpg759860718_MabelLeeMilne(2).JPG.9bb886bd964c0ee765fe5e61a611aa92.JPG

 

Agnes Murdoch Climie was one of six children in quite a wealthy family of Cathcart, near Glasgow. Her father John was a timber merchant’s cashier, at one of the biggest firms or the area and later a company secretary. Agnes would probably not have to work but she found a vocation as a nurse and trained at the Royal Infirmary of Glasgow from 1908 to 1912. At the outbreak of the war she joined the Territorial Forces Nursing Service and joined the staff of the 4th (Scottish) General Hospital at Stobhill. Her personnel file describes her as “very keen” and of good influence. She was promoted to staff nurse in 1915 and sent to St Omer in May 1917.

Agnes’s brother Andrew studied medicine at Glasgow University and qualified in September 1914. He served as a Captain in the RAMC in France. Her other brother James was a private in the Gordon Highlanders. He was WIA but survived the war.

On the 30th September, Nurse Climie was not even on duty but she’d felt her place was in her ward and when the bombs hit, she was singing to a nervous patient.

1753059780_AgnesClimie.jpg.2557916b032b2e009329c66b7e04415d.jpg

1469384247_AgnesMurdochClimietomb.JPG.c4293b2c8d04677f2b1aa9103fb6a666.JPG

In September 1918, BBC-Scotland produced the story of church officers in Glasgow who found a wealth of papers and documents in their ancient church on the local Great War history. The documents contained information about 32 members of their congregation who died in the war, including Agnes Climie. What was interesting to them was that Agnes is not on the church’s memorial. They now want to change that.

The whole story:

https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-scotland-glasgow-west-45611695

 

There's an extra touch to Agnes' story. She was going to have a cousin: William Benzie Forbes Climie was born in 1921, so he never knew her… (I still need to figure out the real family connection, but multiple sources say they are cousins). In 1923 his parents emigrated to the US. When WWII broke out, William joined the Canadian Air Force. On 23rd August 1943 his bomber was shot down during a raid on the IG Farbenworks near Cologne. He is buried today at HEVERLEE WAR CEMETERY which is, as those reading the left pane of this screen might have noticed... my hometown! The cemetery lies at the edge of the woods, and I pass there everytime I go running. so this morning, I put my running shoes on, in passing the cemetery said hello to The Girls (the first row are 6 WWII women casualties) as usual and visited Willam Climie also.

1736068795_WilliamClimie.jpg.d1af6e77801d3b0696fcec0c38e8e6e0.jpg

 

The four women from Longuenesse were laid to rest on the 2nd October by the staff of the hospital and of course in presence of the matron in chief Maud Mc Carthy who wrote in her diary: It was an enormous gathering which lasted over 2 hours – the walks up to the graveside from the gate were lined with walking patients from 58 General Hospital. Overhead aeroplanes were hovering all through the service.

 

M.

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dickaren

I seem to recall from a visit many years ago (if my memory serves me correctly) that there are several nurses buried in Gezaincourt Comm Cem Ext outside Doullens.

Richard

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James A Pratt III

According to the German 1918 NB on 21 Mar 18 Lillers, Wimereux, St Pol and Boulogne were bombed by BG 3 (BG Bombengeswader) Note the Bgs were very active bombing the allied rear areas at night during the 1917-1918 period.

 

I don't have the NBs for the latter months of 1917 you might want to make a post on the aviation section.

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Marilyne
On 23/11/2018 at 18:55, dickaren said:

I seem to recall from a visit many years ago (if my memory serves me correctly) that there are several nurses buried in Gezaincourt Comm Cem Ext outside Doullens.

Richard

 

Richard, 

your memory does not betray you... there are three Canadian nurses in Bagneux British Cemetery, in Gezaincourt. Not sure when I'll make it there, but you' ll read it soon enough!! 

12 hours ago, James A Pratt III said:

According to the German 1918 NB on 21 Mar 18 Lillers, Wimereux, St Pol and Boulogne were bombed by BG 3 (BG Bombengeswader) Note the Bgs were very active bombing the allied rear areas at night during the 1917-1918 period.

 

I don't have the NBs for the latter months of 1917 you might want to make a post on the aviation section.

 

Thanks James!! 

I've been trailing for info on the bombers, I now know where to start. 

 

Marilyne

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Marilyne

Hi all, 

I still owe you a few names after my Dynasty Day visits. 

So for the last ladies at Longuenesse

 

Mabel Edith BLENCOWE was born in Oxford in 1879, the third child of eleven born to John George Blencowe (1839 – 1892) and his wife Emma Blencowe, nee Young (1855 – 1938), six of whom survived.   John Blencowe was a master baker, pastry cook, confectioner and grocer.  After their marriage in December 1885, John and Emma ran a grocer’s shop on Kingston Road in Oxford.  (their ad on the wall was still visible in2014) After the death of her husband, Emma Blencowe ran the business with the help of family members, adding a post office in 1899.   Mabel Edith and her sister Florence Blencowe trained as nurses. Florence worked at Northampton General Hospital in 1911.

At the outbreak of the war, Mabel Edith joined the Territorial Force Nursing Service and after working as a Staff Nurse at Northampton General Hospital for nine months, she was sent to France. She died of cerebral meningitis at the 7th General Hospital at St Omer on 10th March 1917, aged 36

 

27095058_MabelEdithBlencowe.jpg.0dae0f8f5db28f0e9bf1f812cc90edf5.jpg

996884859_M.EBlencowe.JPG.22ed32288e7d20e70de2602ac8ef71df.JPG

 

Edith Frances Barker belonged to a rich Liverpool family who had acquired their wealth by brewing. She lived in Huyton with her father, Richard, mother, Emily, three brothers and two sisters.

Edith joined the British Red Cross as a Voluntary Aid Detachment (VAD) nurse in February 1915 and went to Malta that November. After eight months she was invalided home with dysentery. After a longer period of leave, she returned to duty, this time in France in March 1918. On the 3rd April, she was taken illwhile on duty in St. Omer and died the same evening. There is no direct proof I found that her illness was related to the dysentery she contracted in 1915, but maybe the hospital's files can shed a light... 

246622958_EdithBarker.jpg.804d89377dfd6222246b906cf3adc956.jpg

1958235331_EdithFrancesBarker.JPG.b6fb0b8a556e69dce2cd73fa39f7947e.JPG

 

Last but not least, there are two other graves of women in Longuenesse, on the same row as the nurses of 21/3/18: Lilian Cooper and Rosa Jane Shorter. These both are non war deaths. Lilian was the wife of a surveyor for the CWGC and Rosa, I don't know... more information on these women can be found on another thread, for which thanks to starter and contributor: 

https://www.greatwarforum.org/topic/40238-women-buried-at-longuenesse/?tab=comments#comment-330807

 

That was it for Longuenesse ... I'll be back in better tlight for maybe some more pictures of this very nice place... 

 

Marilyne

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Jim Strawbridge

Edith Barker died of cerebro-spinal meningitis.

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Marilyne

Jim,

 

thanks for the heads up !!!

Do you have a source for that, by any chance?

 

M.

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Jim Strawbridge
21 hours ago, Marilyne said:

Jim,

 

thanks for the heads up !!!

Do you have a source for that, by any chance?

 

M.

 

Sorry, Marilyne, but I don't know where I got that information from.

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Marilyne

no worries, Jim.

 

All,

it's time for the last entry of this year ... after this I need a long research break and... find the time to travel to the other cemeteries...

The last stop of the Dynasty Day tour brought me to Lille Southern Cemetery, the last resting place of Edith Ann Moorhouse.

Lille, and by extention Lille Southern Cemetery wasin the hands of the Germans during the greater part of the War, and after the Armistice taken over by the 39th Stationary Hospital and the 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station, where Edith Moorhouse was stationned.

 

For this information, I own many thanks to forum Pal Frev, for handing me her research on the Australian nurses. THANK YOU !!!!

I only had to summarize the text here:

 

Edith was born in Undera and had 4 siblings. By the age of 6 she was an orphan. She trained as a nurse at Mooroopna General Hospital for three years and passed her final exam for the Royal Victorian Trained Nurses Association in June 1910.

On the 20th July 1915, Edith enlisted as a staff nurse in the AANS, together with a friend of hers, Mary Margaretta Nielsen. Both of them sailed for Alexandria with the 2nd Australian General Hospital in august 1915, where they served at Ras-el-Tin Convalescent Depot until November of that year. February 1916 saw the two friends returning to Australia.

Both re-sailed with 14th General Hospital on 19th August 1916. Edith signed her attestation papers for service abroad out at sea on the 9th September 1916. After Suez, the girls sailed for France, where Edith was posted first to 14th Australian Stationary Hospital and then to 2nd Australian General Hospital. At 2nd AGH Edith was on staff in the operating theatre and the X-ray department. On their picture, Edith is the one sitting to the far right.

1795954051_GroupPic2ndAusGenHosp1918-EAM2ndfromledft.jpg.465e98bbca204f934e746fd9cc035254.jpg

On the 1st October 1918, Edith was posted to 1st Australian Casualty Clearing Station and promoted to Sister. N° 1 ACCS was in St Venant, where, as eye witnesses report, it was wet, cold and they were working in tents on an open field with nearly no heating.

On the 13th November, two days after the Armistice, Edith fell ill and was transferred to 39th Stationary Hospital with pneumonia. She died on the 24th November and was buried two days later in Lille Cemetery.

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one detail on Lille Southern: there are two completly separate plots of CWGC graves. the main one with the Cross is in the middle, next to the French military plot. the WWI graves are more towards the entrance, hidden amongst the civilian graves. the gloomy autumn weather, the leaves on the ground made me add a little filter on this pic, to just accentuate it a little bit. I hope I did right by Edith here...

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That's it for now, I will now dive into my books and concentrate on the area of Etaples, Wimereux, Terlincthun and Boulogne, hoping to be able to  visit them soon.

 

M.

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