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Remembered Today:

Marilyne

Women buried on the Western Front - a complete overview

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Marilyne

Dear all,

 

I'm sure there are other threads on which they are all listed and the topic is old, BUT... this is something I have to start, as sort of penalty...

I made a grave mistake in numbers during a very public explanation this year, on the 4 Days of the Yzer, seriously UNDERstating the number of women casualties of the Great War buried in France... bad preparation from my side... and so I have decided to do pennance and to research them all; and more to the point: VISIT them all! and of course photograph their grave, which is a very nice and new picture-project to boot.

So... starting today, and for as long at it will take me, I'm going to post here everything I find out about the women buried on the Western Front (Belgium and France) in CWGC cemeteries (to start with)

I hope it'll interest somebody...

 

Happy readings!!!

 

Marilyne

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Marilyne

First one is easy ... not much extra research needed, I think we ALL know Staff Nurse Nellie Spindler, who lies in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery in Poperinge, Belgium.

 

nellie_1000.jpg.21ab01b3ccd1cf62d72214dda66c8736.jpg

 

this picture of her grave was taken on the 23th August this year, after the team's little cross-laying ceremony.

959165080_NellieSpindler23Aug2018.jpg.b8d04451c6b47f5e05abc99d935aec1b.jpg

 

Not my best work I agree, I'll try to give her more honour next time.

 

M.

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Terry_Reeves

Some information in this thread Marilyne:

 

 

 

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Marilyne

thanks Terry!  

I intent to pass in Belgrade saturday when driving home from work. Research done, so she will be the next one on the thread.

 

I know this is going to be work of looooooong haul (or how do you say that in correct English??) but in time, I'll get there... 

 

M.

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frev

I'll be very interested to read your findings Marilyne.

Here's another one you won't have to do too much research on - Hilda Mary Knox, Sister AANS - buried in St Sever Cemetery
Her story and photos can be found at this link (scroll down for story): https://discoveringanzacs.naa.gov.au/browse/person/374983

Cheers, Frev

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Marilyne
3 hours ago, frev said:

Here's another one you won't have to do too much research on - Hilda Mary Knox, Sister AANS - buried in St Sever Cemetery

 

 

Thanks for that... I put it in my little database and will tell you when I have the opportunity to go to Rouen.

 

M.

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Jim Strawbridge

Marilyne, I am well advanced in researching all WW1 serving female casualties whether at home or overseas. It is quite a task that you have set yourself. The road has already been trodden but good luck..

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Marilyne

Good afternoon,

 

yesterday on my way back home from Marche-en-Famenne I stopped at Belgrade cemetery for a visit to the second woman buried in Belgium: Sister Elsie Mabel Gladstone.

Elsie was born in India and moved back to Jersey with her family just before the outbreak of the war. She completed her training as a nurse in London, at Guy's hospital in July 1915, served on a hospital ship for some time and then on land in both France and Belgium. the Armistice found her at 48th Casuatly Clearing Station in Namur and confronted to the influenza epidemic. She nursed the soldiers and eventually contracted the disease herself and died.

Apparently Sister Gladstone was one of the handpicked nurses that were trained as anesthetists, a controversial training they underwent to cope with the shortage of MOs. this is certainly a topic I'd like to investigate a it further in due time...

Elsie Galdstone was awarded the Royal Red Cross 2nd Class for her work but died before she could receive it.

A noble and courageous woman!

 

Note please that I HAVE found and read the controversy on this picture, which might (or not) be her ... I guess we will never know for sure.

 

92554673_Elsiegladstone.jpg.a836e0d03f196b4651da52c2d3073453.jpg

 

As for her headstone... there had been a project by a local school that colored doves and placed them on various graves in the war cemetery. Elsie got two.

I also like the fact that her grave is situated directly facing the Cross ...

 

1210250966_Elsiegladstone13Oct18.JPG.b40aa50185bde19f8ad008e7265551ab.JPG

 

That's the Belgian part of the expedition done, now up to France...

 

Marilyne

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Fattyowls

Perhaps an obvious one but I like to visit the grave of Helen Fairchild when I've been to Bony American Cemetery. Helen was an American nurse who worked with British and Dominion casualties during 1917 and 1918 at Dozinghem. A search of the forum and the wider internet will pull up lots of info, and some of the earlier threads on women.

 

Pete.

 

P.S. I have a photo of her grave somewhere but it's on paper from a 35mm negative, remember them?

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Marilyne
40 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

Perhaps an obvious one but I like to visit the grave of Helen Fairchild when I've been to Bony American Cemetery. Helen was an American nurse who worked with British and Dominion casualties during 1917 and 1918 at Dozinghem. A search of the forum and the wider internet will pull up lots of info, and some of the earlier threads on women.

 

Pete.

 

P.S. I have a photo of her grave somewhere but it's on paper from a 35mm negative, remember them?

 

You means the ones where you simply could not afford to make 700pics of ONE concert night and then spend hours to sort them out and post-produce... aaaah... those were times...

kidding...

 

US cemeteries are outside my initial scope... I'd like to stick to CWGC in a first time. But IF I'm in the area, I'll look her up...

 

M.

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Fattyowls
Just now, Marilyne said:

 

You means the ones where you simply could not afford to make 700pics of ONE concert night and then spend hours to sort them out and post-produce... aaaah... those were times...

kidding...

 

US cemeteries are outside my initial scope... I'd like to stick to CWGC in a first time. But IF I'm in the area, I'll look her up...

 

M.

 

Not a problem MM, Helen was originally buried in Le Treport and moved when Bony was opened.  I mentioned your project to my sister and she's already thinking of signing up for the tour that accompanies the book that follows on from the project. One of Ted Walshe's epic blogs has some photos of a Canadian nurse being buried at Etaples, I'll try and work my way back through to see if I can find it.

 

Send my best to bear.

 

Pete.

 

P.S. 700 is some going, especially as I know how you compose your photos. Was that using the mobile missile launcher or the compact? Did you get a chance to listen to any of the music?

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Marilyne
16 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

 

Not a problem MM, Helen was originally buried in Le Treport and moved when Bony was opened.  I mentioned your project to my sister and she's already thinking of signing up for the tour that accompanies the book that follows on from the project. One of Ted Walshe's epic blogs has some photos of a Canadian nurse being buried at Etaples, I'll try and work my way back through to see if I can find it.

 

Send my best to bear.

 

Pete.

 

P.S. 700 is some going, especially as I know how you compose your photos. Was that using the mobile missile launcher or the compact? Did you get a chance to listen to any of the music?

 

BOOK???? 

What book??? don't give me strange ideas... 

 

As to the concert... venue required the missile launcher... and for the music, just go for "Musique Royale des Guides" on YouTube... it was my unit's yearly Gala Concert. 

 

M.

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Fattyowls
16 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

What book??? don't give me strange ideas...

 

In that case we will just have to wait for Jim's book to come out.

 

The Canadian nurse in Ted's blog is Nursing Sister Margaret Lowe. Do a search of the forum for her name and it turns up some excellent photos.

 

Pete.

 

 

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Marilyne

thanks for the tip, Pete!! 

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spof

If you have not done so already, have a look at this new thread from Le Havre

 

 

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Marilyne
7 minutes ago, spof said:

If you have not done so already, have a look at this new thread from Le Havre

 

 

 

Ken, 

 

I saw the post this morning. 

These are 4 out of the SEVENTEEN women buried on that cemetery... that's some work ahead to ID them all... 

 

M.

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DoubleD

Hi Marilyne,

 

I'm not sure how far this is away from you, but I have attached the information I have on Sister Mabel Lee Milne, who is buried in Longuenesse (St Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, France. I have also included some photos we took on our school trip in May/June this year.

 

As you will see in the extract from the war diary three nurses were killed in the air raid, and I'm pretty sure they are buried side-by-side. Unfortunately we didn't realise this at the time of the trip, and didn't take any photos of the other two headstones.

 

Hope this is of some use.

 

Dave

Info for gwf.pdf

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MKC

Frev has alerted you to Sister Knox. The other AANS buried in Europe is Edith Ann Moorehouse at Lille Southern Cemetery, who died after the end of the war on 24 Nov. 1918, but within the prescribed period.

 

CWGC also list three AANS buried in the UK, and one in Greece, should your database ever extend that far.

 

I also will look forward to both researcher's books, should they choose to publish, as every author has their own 'take' on a particular line of research.

 

Mike

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tbirduk

Doris Mary LUKER died of Pneumonia 13 Feb 1919 and lies at 72.B.15 Etaples Military Cemetery as Worker 6947 in Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps,

Born Woking 13 Jan 1898 2nd daughter, youngest of 3 children, her elder brother James Ryder LUKER had been killed during the Battle of the Somme at High Wood 15 September 1916
 Doris joined up January 1917 and arrived in France 23 February 1918.
I would very much appreciate an image of her Headstone as she is the only Great War Female casualty on the Woking Town Great War Memorial and appears to have been added to the Christ Church Parishioners Memorial as an afterthought! 
 

wok_mem_ju(10).jpg

woking_ChristChurch_Mem.jpg

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Marilyne
On ‎14‎/‎10‎/‎2018 at 16:52, DoubleD said:

Hi Marilyne,

 

I'm not sure how far this is away from you, but I have attached the information I have on Sister Mabel Lee Milne, who is buried in Longuenesse (St Omer) Souvenir Cemetery, France. I have also included some photos we took on our school trip in May/June this year.

 

As you will see in the extract from the war diary three nurses were killed in the air raid, and I'm pretty sure they are buried side-by-side. Unfortunately we didn't realise this at the time of the trip, and didn't take any photos of the other two headstones.

 

Hope this is of some use.

 

Dave

Info for gwf.pdf

Thank you for that. 

I actually had the names of the two others: Agnes Climie and Daisy Coles, that makes the line complete. On your pictures, you can see the name of Sister Climie. 

There are three other ladies in Longuenesse, for a total of 6 women. 

 

M.

Edited by Marilyne

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MKC

Marilyne,

 

There is also Louise Blanch Riggall, buried in St Sever Cemetery, Rouen. She was a member of the Australian Red Cross Society. More information about her can be gained from the Maffra Spectator newspaper of Monday 24 Feb 1919, via the NLA's Trove website. 

 

Mike

 

 

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frev
On 10/10/2018 at 16:34, frev said:

 

Here's another one you won't have to do too much research on - Hilda Mary Knox, Sister AANS - buried in St Sever Cemetery
Her story and photos can be found at this link (scroll down for story): https://discoveringanzacs.naa.gov.au/browse/person/374983

 

 

On 15/10/2018 at 02:13, MKC said:

Frev has alerted you to Sister Knox. The other AANS buried in Europe is Edith Ann Moorehouse at Lille Southern Cemetery, who died after the end of the war on 24 Nov. 1918, but within the prescribed period.

 

 

On 15/10/2018 at 04:12, MKC said:

 

There is also Louise Blanch Riggall, buried in St Sever Cemetery, Rouen. She was a member of the Australian Red Cross Society. More information about her can be gained from the Maffra Spectator newspaper of Monday 24 Feb 1919, via the NLA's Trove website.

 

 

Hi again Marilyne

 

As well as the 3 Australian ladies mentioned above by Mike & myself - the only other Australian lady I have in my databases that is buried on the Western Front is:

Myrtle Elizabeth Wilson (QAIMNSR), who died 23/12/1915 at the 14th GH of pneumonia, and is buried in the Wimereux Comm Cemetery

I have files on all these ladies if you need any help

Cheers, Frev

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MKC

For interest, I just put the term 'Riggall' into the forum search box, which resulted in a list of several threads on this forum which have information about Louise Riggall, too.   

 

Mike

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Marilyne

Hi all,

 

Turning to France now...

A few weeks ago I accompanied the Boyfriend to the ceremony at the NATO memorial in Frethun and we made a WE in Calais of it. After having to endure a ceremony that lasted three hours and featured in that short period of time more protocol breaches than I have seen in 20 years of army (OK... not the topic...) I had enough arguments to drag him to Les Baraques Cemetery in Sangatte, Calais on the sunday.

An interesting cemetery for its really eclectic collection of inhabitants: British, Germans, Chinese, South African and Egyptian labor corps, one belgian and one japanese sailor, two soldiers shot at dawn (one british and one chinese), a handfull of civilians and even a 7 year old boy.

Thtat's bound to be normal for a cemetery related to a logistic depot and a few stationary hospitals

And amongst them are three women, all three victims of the flu pandemic that swept through Europe at the end of 1918 and beginning of 1919.

 

Unfortunately, I have not found much information on these two on the internet, except what's in their records on the CWGC webpage. Nor have I found any picture of them.

 

Sister Ethel Blundell Radcliffe was born in India in 1874. At some point her parents moved to Jersey, presumably when she was still a child. She joined Queen Alexandra's Imperial Nursinv Service and died of broncho-pneumonia follwoing influenza on the 10th march 1919, aged 45. this leads me to think that she must have been a professional nurse even before the war. I might be wrong of course, but I'd like to picture her as an example of efficiency following a lifelong experience.

Worker Silance Ethel Davis was from Nothingham. She died 25th September 1919. The nothingham county council archives say that in 1911 she worked as a draper's assistant. Did she have a similar job in Queen Mary's Army Auxiliary Corps?? Maybe working on soldier's uniforms or making tents ... I guess it's hard to find out.

the picture of her grave, I admit, is not mine... as this project started after I went to the cemetery, I already had pictures of the two others but had to hit the CWGC database to find out the name of Nb 3 (sorry to just call you a numer, Silance). I'lll go back one day.

Anyway, if anybody out there on the forum has some information on these ladies, I'll be very grateful.

 

389796504_SisterRadcliffe.JPG.9fbcc69a76527ba1cbac3f65389d2f07.JPG

1034608366_SilanceEthelDavis.jpg.d21d8060bc792973ef19d20cb27d3b9b.jpg

 

I need just one last bit of info and tomorrow I'll introduce you to Cora, also laying in Sangatte.

 

good night everybody,

 

M.

 

 

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