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Remembered Today:

Ross binoculars


perejler
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The way I read it Audrey et al managed the vineyards up at Pokolbin. Harry's father John had the shop in Sydney and Harry also worked there.

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You could be right. I thought the Coolata brand was different to the Audley brand.

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I think the Audrey brand is fairly new....

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Coolalta Wines where Harry worked in Sydney was only about 300m from the distributor. I am going to predict he was also a militia officer, unfortunately I don't know how we can prove it!

More interesting reading here:

http://webjournals.ac.edu.au/ojs/index.php/ADPCM/article/view/231/228

Hopefully it can be proved by a current family member knowing his forebear's history. Given that Harry seems to have been a leading light in setting up the company, I imagine that his personality and life's history might be well recorded.
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The name John A Wilkinson Coolata Wines is on the bottle label.

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The Audley brand shows a picture of Audley on the label. I can't post the images because they are too big!

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"Perhaps the old boy gifted his binoculars to equip a family member going off to the war." ---- very likely, a binoculars offering a bit more magnification than the millitary standard 4 to 5x mag. was offered by several firms and even the 8X Ross are not a mini binocular, it is a resonable size and very rugid. But even it is a millitary model, it do not carry recticles -- a primitive scale in one side that allow you to compeed sizes and with a simple rule decide distances in "Mil's"

https://www.leupold.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Tactical-Milling-Reticle-Man.pdf

--- even this was offered with the first Zeiss Df 95 officers binocular in 1895, it was not a standart option, Several of the millitary bino's in our collection do not carry recticles, both german and frensh, Still if they had carried that, they cirtainly would have belonged the artillery, but not as a gift as only very few knew this feature. --- being able to use the binoculars to measure distances.

Spekulation, true. -- but no one know if that is not what will point the right direction.

One information about the binoculars is now confirmed, I had trouble reading it's serial number even using a loupe. It was the first number that was the problem as it was difficult to see if it is a "2" or a "3", but today I tried looking from another angle and that uncovered the right number to be "34887". Now this is both good and not so good, becaurse untill today I thought Ross second serie would stop before number 30000, as that you can read several places on the web. 34880 and placed a very uncommon place, not on one of the back plates as with all Ross second serie I know make me think that maybe it is time asking other binocular collectors ; I guess it is allright if I write about this tread in some of the internasional mail lists for binocular collectors., also please exchouse my english, english are not my prime language.

I am surprised and happy about the huge efford members put in uncovering this mysterie, and I think the chance to make the full circle seem more and more realistic, -- that would be wonderfull.

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How about this one. His brother John Frederick Moore Wilkinson is living in London in 1911 - occupation Captain, 1st Australian Horse.

Served in the Boer War and looks like commissioned into RFA in Great War. Later a Major. He has papers at NA.

http://search.ancestry.com.au/cgi-bin/sse.dll?db=1911England&h=1475712&ti=5544&indiv=try&gss=pt&ssrc=pt_t2467558_p1054700747_kpidz0q3d1054700747z0q26pgz0q3d32768z0q26pgplz0q3dpid

Rgds

Tim D

He is shown as living in a prestigious mansion block with his wife of 9 yrs, no children and a ladies maid. He died in Worthing in 1958 leaving £2000.

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I see Harry has a Jane Wilkinson at the same address in 1930 Australian Census. There is a marriage between a Harry and Annie J Driscoll recorded in 1897. Children to these two appear to be Doris GH born 1899 and Harry E born 1901. Unfortunately nobody appears to have done an indepth family tree on Harry Noel.

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I see Harry has a Jane Wilkinson at the same address in 1930 Australian Census. There is a marriage between a Harry and Annie J Driscoll recorded in 1897. Children to these two appear to be Doris GH born 1899 and Harry E born 1901. Unfortunately nobody appears to have done an indepth family tree on Harry Noel.

I do hope that the vineyard replies to johnboy's email, as we do not know if family members are still involved with the company (or do we?), sometimes a company name is retained for brand marketing reasons even though the interest has long changed hands.

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I think Audrey Wilkinson is just the brand....Coolalta sold out to Lindemann's before WW1. That said I think they had a number of vineyards and look to have been fairly established in Hunter Valley so we might get lucky. I'll PM a few of the family tree owners on Ancestry.

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Agnew Wines History

Inspired by Australia’s achievement and international standing in the global wine industry and armed with a love of wine and a strong desire to build a generational family business, the Agnew family entered the Australian wine industry in 2004 with the acquisition of the historic Audrey Wilkinson Vineyard in the Hunter Valley.

Just found. Disappointing.

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Agnew Wines History

Inspired by Australias achievement and international standing in the global wine industry and armed with a love of wine and a strong desire to build a generational family business, the Agnew family entered the Australian wine industry in 2004 with the acquisition of the historic Audrey Wilkinson Vineyard in the Hunter Valley.

Just found. Disappointing.

I thought that might be the case. I think that pursuing the genealogy route is probably the best course to take. Hopefully Tim might get a response.

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I have a mate who owns one of the vineyards up there. I'll drop him a line to see if there are any Wilkinsons still floating about in the area.

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I have now broadcasted the link for this tread in a Facebook binoculars groupe. There are more options as I will contact the most famous discussion list that is internasional to, --- issues in these lists often are production or serial numbers, and this have it's serial number placed a different place than other Ross 8X If. and Cf. binoculars, also the serial number of "34887", will make collectors aware.

I can not say why, and it is proberly speculation, but I have a suspision that the date are an important issue, worth to remember when trace start to pay off as I see it cirtainly have. I am very happy the trace allready narrowed as it have, but the aid also have been nessery becaurse my ability to handle historic documents are less than zero. All I can contribuate are what I know about millitary binoculars from that periode, the differences between civilian and millitary binoculars, what I know about the maker aso. Also I see this piece as more of a museum piece than a collectors item. As I said, we allready have one simular in the collection, that like this, carry no broad arow, so that one proberly also have been sold to a private person even being a millitary model with individual focus, Sorry if I repeat some of my writing, but it is important to remember these facts, and I like to share my contribution.

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Here's another couple of possible soldiers from the Wilkinson family mentioned:

http://trove.nla.gov.au/ndp/del/article/128058492?searchTerm=wilkinson%20pokolbin&searchLimits=l-decade=191

Rgds

Tim D

Blimey Tim, what time is it there? Don't you ever go to sleep! :blink:

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It is such a shame that first names or regiments are not given.

I have had a look at incoming passenger lists from Sydney, but again most are just given as Mr Wilkinson or with just one initial. As the name is not unusual it is like looking for a needle in a haystack.

Plus, of course we may have the wrong family!

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Blimey Tim, what time is it there? Don't you ever go to sleep! :blink:

It's only about 1530. I'm in Dubai - Forum won't let me change location for some reason.

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Wilkinson, Audrey Harold (1877–1962)

by W. P. Driscoll

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 12, (MUP), 1990

Audrey Harold Wilkinson (1877-1962), vigneron, was born on 29 July 1877 at Five Dock, Sydney, son of Frederick Albert Wilkinson (d.1883), a 'gentleman vigneron' from England, and his Adelaide-born wife Florence Mary Hindmarsh, daughter of George Milner Stephen and granddaughter of Rear Admiral Sir John Hindmarsh. Frederick had come to Pokolbin, New South Wales, about 1865 and planted the first wine grapes at Oakdale in 1866; he also selected a property (Côte d'Or) for his father and others (Mangerton, Coolalta and Maluna) for his brothers Charles, John and William respectively. The family became dominant in establishing viticulture in the Pokolbin area.

Having briefly attended West Maitland Public School and been tutored at home, at the age of 15 Audrey took charge of Oakdale and managed the property for the remainder of his life, mostly working the vineyard with his brother Garth. His activities were bound up with the affairs of his property (which combined wine production and dairying) and focused on the district rather than beyond it. In 1901 he became secretary of the Pokolbin and District Vinegrowers' Association (1901-14) which has been credited with influencing the passage of the first effective Wine Adulteration Act (1902) in New South Wales. He was also active in its successor, the Pokolbin and District Agricultural Bureau, and kept the rainfall figures for Pokolbin for over half a century.

Tall and slight, with keen blue eyes and an ascetic face, Wilkinson was a lifelong teetotaller. Commissioned in the 4th Australian Light Horse Regiment in 1913, he was promoted captain of the 6th L.H.R. but did not see service overseas during World War I. He enjoyed playing tennis at home and occasionally visited Sydney. At Christ Church Cathedral, Newcastle, Wilkinson married Beatrice Blomfield on 12 April 1921 with Anglican rites; they were to remain childless. For much of their married life she helped to run the vineyard and did office work, but by 1949 was almost entirely bedridden.

Courteous and cultured, Wilkinson did business 'in the old reliable, trustworthy way'; his 'outlook on men and affairs also dated from other times'. Oakdale slowly declined during the lean years of the Hunter wine industry from the 1930s. Wilkinson's wine-making reputedly involved squeezing grapes into clean kerosene tins and fortifying the juice with spirits. He continued to drive his 1920 Buick. Faced with changing times, he did not adapt, preferring to spend his days writing, and attending to Beatrice. Survived by his wife, he died at Cessnock on 30 July 1962 and was cremated.

Select Bibliography
  • Cyclopedia of N.S.W. (Syd, 1907)
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It's only about 1530. I'm in Dubai - Forum won't let me change location for some reason.

Ah I see....makes sense now. Watch out for those randy camels!

Wilkinson, Audrey Harold (1877–1962)

by W. P. Driscoll

This article was published in Australian Dictionary of Biography, Volume 12, (MUP), 1990

Audrey Harold Wilkinson (1877-1962), vigneron, was born on 29 July 1877 at Five Dock, Sydney, son of Frederick Albert Wilkinson (d.1883), a 'gentleman vigneron' from England, and his Adelaide-born wife Florence Mary Hindmarsh, daughter of George Milner Stephen and granddaughter of Rear Admiral Sir John Hindmarsh. Frederick had come to Pokolbin, New South Wales, about 1865 and planted the first wine grapes at Oakdale in 1866; he also selected a property (Côte d'Or) for his father and others (Mangerton, Coolalta and Maluna) for his brothers Charles, John and William respectively. The family became dominant in establishing viticulture in the Pokolbin area.

Having briefly attended West Maitland Public School and been tutored at home, at the age of 15 Audrey took charge of Oakdale and managed the property for the remainder of his life, mostly working the vineyard with his brother Garth. His activities were bound up with the affairs of his property (which combined wine production and dairying) and focused on the district rather than beyond it. In 1901 he became secretary of the Pokolbin and District Vinegrowers' Association (1901-14) which has been credited with influencing the passage of the first effective Wine Adulteration Act (1902) in New South Wales. He was also active in its successor, the Pokolbin and District Agricultural Bureau, and kept the rainfall figures for Pokolbin for over half a century.

Tall and slight, with keen blue eyes and an ascetic face, Wilkinson was a lifelong teetotaller. Commissioned in the 4th Australian Light Horse Regiment in 1913, he was promoted captain of the 6th L.H.R. but did not see service overseas during World War I. He enjoyed playing tennis at home and occasionally visited Sydney. At Christ Church Cathedral, Newcastle, Wilkinson married Beatrice Blomfield on 12 April 1921 with Anglican rites; they were to remain childless. For much of their married life she helped to run the vineyard and did office work, but by 1949 was almost entirely bedridden.

Courteous and cultured, Wilkinson did business 'in the old reliable, trustworthy way'; his 'outlook on men and affairs also dated from other times'. Oakdale slowly declined during the lean years of the Hunter wine industry from the 1930s. Wilkinson's wine-making reputedly involved squeezing grapes into clean kerosene tins and fortifying the juice with spirits. He continued to drive his 1920 Buick. Faced with changing times, he did not adapt, preferring to spend his days writing, and attending to Beatrice. Survived by his wife, he died at Cessnock on 30 July 1962 and was cremated.

Select Bibliography
  • Cyclopedia of N.S.W. (Syd, 1907)

If he did not serve overseas the binos were either lost during a visit to French vineyards or he passed them on to a family member (assuming of course the binos were actually his).

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Just trying to discount some of them.

Yes, I understand. Process of elimination. Makes sense.

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I keep looking at the picture in the link given in post #7. I have put it full screen and can zoom in and move it around. I don't seem able to open it if I save it!

Anyway, I am now not sure if the first initial is H. It looks to be in a different style and size? Could it be interlocked J and C?

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A more serious wine venture began in 1866 when two Wilkinson brothers - Frederick and John from a well-to-do family in Surrey - bought land at Pokolbin in the Hunter valley and started planting vines there.

Maybe a dig around Surrey. It would be funny if the bins were made in London, sold in Sydney and found their way back to surrey as a gift!

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