Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Gallipoli Photos WWI


Guest

Recommended Posts

Hello - The Hon Curator of the Kent and Sharpshooters Yeomanry Museum (KSY Museum) has kindly given permission to post some Gallipoli photographs of the 1st/3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters). There are over 50 photos in total, from the albums of Lt Col A Weston Jarvis who commanded the Sharpshooters in Gallipoli and Palestine. I hope that these photos will generate some interest and draw out more information on the Sharpshooters and the people in the photos. I shall try and post one a day on the same thread in chronological order. I will post one photo at a time in order to make them as large as possible. Please note that these are the copyright of the KSY Museum. I trust that members will respect the integrity of this copyright. The agreement is that they can be shown for research purposes only. The diary entries transcribed are from the War Diaries held at The National Archives.

I have attached some info on Lt Col Weston Jarvis from Wikipedia. I can not vouch for the accuracy of this info as I have not had time to check it, but on first glance it looks OK. http://en.wikipedia....i/Weston_Jarvis. The Weston Jarvis archives are available to the public by appointment. They include diaries, maps and photograph albums from the Boer War through to Gallipoli and Palestine, ending in 1916. Regards MG

Here is the first picture: Number 31.3. The Caption reads "Alexandria August 1915 - Regiment Embarking for Gallipoli on SS Caledonia 14th August"

post-55873-0-48837800-1299459683.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin,

I have followed your other thread with much interest. As you will see from my signature my Gt-Uncle was part of the Sharpshooters and I only know the basics concerning his war record from the 1/3rd war diaries. Looking forward to the photo's and learning more, thanks for posting,

Stuart.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 31.4 "HMT Caledonia" I have attached some diary extracts to expand on what was being done on the day of the photo(s). The SS Caledonia was carrying the 4th (London) Mtd Bde and elements of the 5th Mtd Bde consisting of 5 Yeomanry Regiments, each in double squadrons (160) per Sqn plus an MG section (26) each plus a depleted cadre of Officers (12-15) and transport details. Each Regiment had to leave behind a weak Sqn of roughly 100 men each to look after the horses. Infantry webbing had been issued only 2 days earlier (Aug 12th) and the Yeoman had to be shown how to assemble the webbing by walking wounded infantry men from the hospitals. The march from the barracks to the respective stations was the first time the Yeomen had carried their own packs, and the pain was much commented on. As mentioned on another thread, such was the indignation of being dismounted, at least one Yeomanry regiment marched to the station in spurs however there was general relief that they were finally embarking for active service.

The flotilla would have been particularly aware of U Boats (The SS Caledonia was later sunk by one at the end of 1916) and the news of the sinking of the SS Royal Edward one day into their voyage which has been discussed on this link previously - http://1914-1918.inv...showtopic=59453 Also of some interest see http://www.paulinedo...oyaledward.html and http://en.wikipedia....no_von_Heimburg

War Diaries for the Embarkation:

4th (London) Mtd Bde War Diary

14th Aug
"The Bde entrained for ALEXANDRIA. Embarked on SS CALEDONIA. 3 Officers and 92 men embarked on SS KNIGHT TEMPLAR. Sailed 4 pm."

1st/3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters) War Diary

14th Aug
"MOASCAR ISMAILIA. The Regt 2 Sqns strong under Lt Col Jarvis entrained for ALEXANDRIA at 2:30 am. Each Sqn having a strength of 160 NCOs and men. Sqn Leaders Maj Lewellyn and Maj Bell. The third Sqn under Maj L K Jarvis being left at MOASCAR in charge of the horses. .... Arrived at ALEXANDRIA at 10:30 am and embarked for GALLIPOLI on SS CALEDONIA. Sailed at 5:30 pm. Officers of the Regt Sailing: Lt Col A W JARVIS, Maj LLEWELLYN, Maj BELL, Capt CUTBILL, Lt FITZGERALD, Lt MAINWARING, 2 Lts SCHUSTER, DE PASS, CROCKER, MARSON, RICH, SHEDDEN, BROOKS, FINDLAY, Capt HASTINGS (Adjutant) Maj PARSONS (QM) Capt FRANCIS (Bde MG Officer) and 2 Lt THORPE (Regtl MG Officer"

15th Aug
"At Sea. Church parade on deck. Received news by wireless of SS ROYAL EDWARD having been torpedoed"

16th Aug
"Arrived at MUDROS BAY 1 pm tied up alongside SS FRANCONIA"

1st/1st County of London Yeomanry (Middlesex Hussars) War Diary.

14th Aug
"
MOASCAR. 2.45 am. Two Sqns & MG Section entrained & left MOASCAR. Total strength 160 per Sqn, 26 MG & 16 Officers. All wire cutters and entrenching tools taken by these two Sqns. 12 Officers & remainder of men left in MOASCAR CAMP with horses. The following carts were taken: 2 SAA, 1 tool cart, 4 SAA MG & 1 GS Wagon, 1 Water Cart. (Note: All ranks were issued with web equipment and entrenching tools previous to leaving Moascar. ).... 9:45 am Commenced detraining at ALEXANDRIA and embarked on SS CALEDONIA. All carts and mules embarked on SS KNIGHT TEMPLAR. All transport animals wer mules. Sailed in the afternoon. (2nd in Command of Regt and Sqns lef behind)"

Capt Benn (Middlesex Hussars)
"Suddenly,a few days later, a mass of infantry equipment was dumped in the camp ; everyone was paraded and fitted with unfamiliar implements, entrenching tools and the like,and it was definitely announced that we were to go. The explanation, though we didnot know it then, was that all reserves from everywhere had to be collected after the failure of August 9th to make a further attempt to break through atSuvla. Our last parade in the hated desert at Moascar took place at 3 a.m. onAugust 13th ; a weird roll call, the men in infantry marching order and loaded, in addition, with all sorts of bundles and packs. No moon, lanterns held up to read the names, here and there a shout for an absentee, a hum of talking and the electrical atmosphere of a mob tuned to one emotion. Then the sharp word of command and we were off. We embarked at once at Alexandria, in the Caledonia, a North Atlantic passenger ship equipped against cold rather than heat. The following day we were admitted through the boom into Lemnos harbour. Here at least we were at the "back of the front." Men were daily coming from and going to the war ; there were hospital ships, things we had never before seen ; and all round us was theparched and barren island of Mudros diapered with camps and military roads. Therewere fog-banks of rumour. We had succeeded, we had been driven back, we were holdingon to the beach by the skin of our teeth, we were already across to Maidos. We had certain news that the transport preceding us had been sunk with only a few hundredsaved".

The Middlesex Yeomary War History
"Saturday evening, August 14th found the regiment sailing out of Alexandria on the SS Caledonia as full-blown infantry men in the company of similar detachments of all the other eleven units of the 2nd Mounted Div. Trooper Leybourn* who had been detailed to remain behind with the horses was discovered on board and was severely reprimanded by the Colonel who told him not to do it again"

* 3307 Tpr Joseph G Leybourne later 110836 MGC.

1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders) War Diary.

14th Aug
"Arrived at ALEXANDRIA docks at 6 am and embarked on board H M T CALEDONIA. 17 Officers and 315 OR s. All transport with 1 Officer Lt E T Palmer and 36 OR s embarked on H M T KNIGHT TEMPLAR. Sailed at 6 pm."

5th Mtd Bde War Diary

13th Aug "
5th Yeomanry Brigade (Herts & 2nd County of London Yeomanry) left ABBASSIA under Brig Gen Tyndale Biscoe for dismounted service oversaes Hd Qtrs 53 + 5 Officers Herts 355 + 14 Officers 2/Co of L Yeo 320 + 13 Officers ….. With mules and Transport. Total for Brigade Officers 32 , Other Ranks 728"

14th Aug
"Bde arrived at ALEXANDRIA and embarked as follows: - Bde Staff and 2/Co London Yeo on SS CALEDONIA….. Herts Yeo and Transport on SS KNIGHT TEMPLAR"

1st/1st Herts Yeomanry War Diary

13th Aug "
ABBASSIA. The Regt having been issued with Infantry web equipment proceeded as a dismounted unit oversaes. Forming with the 2nd Co of London Yeomanry the 5th Regt of the 2nd Mounted Divisionwhich had been reorganised. The Regt left ABBASSIA siding at 08:30 pm with 14 Officers and 355 Other Ranks, 2 horses , 32 mules, 8 waggons & 1 Water Cart with 17 attached drivers. The Bde Bn Officers attached were Brig Gen J Tyndale Biscoe, Maj G T Williams (Bde Major) and Capt C A Hawkins Staff Captain and the Regtmental Officers proceeding were Lt Col S G SHEPPARD DSO, Maj R HALSEY, Maj H Wild, Capt A C W CLACTON, Lts R A SMITH, R F BARNETT, , L G RAM, V C PONSONBY, 2 Lts T HOLLAND-HIBBERT, G BUNLIFFE G N CHARRINGTON, H W E LESLIE, H G N DANIELL and Capt & Adjutant T G L LUMLEY-SMITH (21st Lancers). In accordance with Div orders the follwing remained at ABBASSIA - Maj E B SHEPPARD, Capt A O PART, 2 Lts R C FAULCONER and H F CRITCHLEY, Lt L WEST RAMC, Lt (QM) W S ANSELL with 85 OR s.

14th Aug
"04:00. Reached ALEXANDRIA and at once embarked on HT KNIGHT TEMPLAR with exception of attached Bde HQ Staff and 2nd Lt LESLIE, DANIELL who were accommodated on HT CALEDONIA. 9:30 pm Transport left ALEXANDRIA"

1st/2nd County of London Yeomanry (Westminster Dragoons) War Diary.

14th Aug
"
ABBASSIA.
2:15 am Entrained for ALEXANDRIA. Forming part of the 2nd Mounted Div. Herts Yeo & West. Drag Regiments 5th Mtd Bde under? Brig Gen Tyndale Biscoe. Maj Williams Bde Major. Capt Hawkins Staff Capt Signallers & HQ Staff for thr Bde being [..?..] up from the Regts. Regts not to exceed 2 Sqns of 160 NCOs and Men and MG Section of 26 = 346. (Strength 15 Officers, 328 NCOs and Men, 16 attached drivers =total 344.... Serjt [..?] promoted 2nd Lt just prior to Regt marching off from ABBASSIA & 1 man fellout sick, men are 2 below establishment) .... 09:00 am ALEXANDRIA Embarked on HMT CALEDONIA - B2 - (Strength 15 Officers 327 NCOs and Men. Sergt Younghusband & 16 drivers attached & went on KNIGHT TEMPLAR with Transport)"

SS Caledonia. There were a number ships called SS Caledonia. I think this is the one but I may be wrong (see below). I am way out of my comfort zone here, but I am sure our Naval friends can help on more detail. If it is, it looks like she was sunk by a U Boat. The name SS Caledonia appears in a few diaries so she must have done a fair amount of service in the Med. It was rated to carry 1,428 passengers. ;

Bibliography:

North Atlantic Seaway; An Illustrated History of the Passenger Services Linking the Old World with the New
(2nd ed.; Jersey, Channel Islands: Brookside Publications), vol. 1, [1975] by

Pictured in Michael J. Anuta,
Ships of Our Ancestors
(Menominee, MI: Ships of Our Ancestors, 1983; reprint Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., [1993], Pictured on p. 39

Web:

post-55873-0-16184100-1299459933.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin,

"the Yeoman had to be shown how to assemble the webbing by walking wounded infantry men from the hospitals" - fascinating detail

This photograph seems to agree with that of the KSY Museum

SSCaledonia.jpg

regards

Michael

Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin, "the Yeoman had to be shown how to assemble the webbing by walking wounded infantry men from the hospitals" - fascinating detail. Michael

That's only part of it. I forgot to mention that there was absolutely no infantry training. They went into battle completely untrained for what they did. To manoeuvre the troops they used cavalry drill. It makes the Yeomanry's assault on Scimitar Hill on 21st August even more remarkable.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 32.1 "Mudros Harbour 16th August"

1st/3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters) War Diary 16th Aug - "Arrived at MUDROS BAY 1 pm tied up alongside SS FRANCONIA"

post-55873-0-91166100-1299460050.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 32.2 "Transhipping from HM Transport Caledonia to HMS Doris Mudros Bay 17th August"

War Diaries & Histories for 17th Aug:

4th (London) Mtd Bde
"Received orders to embark on HMS DORIS at 4:15 pm. Medical equipment on SS KNIGHT TEMPLAR also men who took the place of maxim detachment were ordered to rejoin before sailing but failed. Sailed about 10:15 pm"

1st/3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters)
"
Transhipped at 4:30 pm to HMS DORIS and sailed for SUVLA BAY at 10 pm. Major Bell and Lts Mainwaring, Fitzgerald and Findlay remained at MUDROS"

1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders)
"13 Officers , 311 OR s
transferred to HM Cruiser DORIS about 6:30 pm en route to SUVLA BAY. Maj O M Croshaw, Capt E Pery, Capt C P Stedall 2 Lt I S Underwood and 4 servants left on board H M T CALEDONIA"

1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders) History by A S Hamilton
:
"During the evening of the 17th, leaving only a small reserve which in the case of the Roughriders consisted of Maj Croshaw, Capt C P Steadall, Capt Perry, 2 Lt Underwood and their four servants, both Bdes were transferred to HMS Doris aboard which they had to remain on deck, tightly packed and with barely room to sit, but none the less beguiling the hours of waiting with song. At 11 pm the Doris moved out with lights screened and guns crews closed up and steamed uneventfully through the night to anchor in Suvla Bay shortly after dawn.. Lighters and "beetles" at once cam alongside, the latter being the capacious steel pontoons originally designed for Lord Fisher's Baltic scheme. Orders were piped and disembarkation began"

1st/1st County of London Yeomanry (Middlesex Hussars)
"5 pm transhipped to HMS DORIS. All ranks issued with 2 days Iron Rations & our ordinary rations & carried 200 rounds of ammunition"

Capt Benn (Middlesex Hussars)
"
On the second afternoon, i.e. August 17th,we were transhipped to the old Doris, where every inch of space was packed. It is literally true to say that there wasn't room to stretch. We were fed by the ship's officers from their own rations, and I at least slept under the stars deep and soberly.Very early we awoke to find ourselves slowly steaming up the west coast of the Peninsula.We were perfectly happy ; everything for us made new ; the old, silly, tedious ritual gone ; inferior people in their proper inferior place ; only one stick to measure by—" Are you good for a job of work ? "; everyone your comrade officers and men a band of brothers; all that had happened seemed ten thousand times right".

post-55873-0-31682700-1299460213.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 32.3 "Suvla Bay - Gallipoli - Disembarking from HMS Doris Early Morning 18th August" [Note one of the ramp of one of the distinctive armoured 'beetles' is visible off the port side of HMS Doris. MG]

War Diaries & Histories for 18th Aug: [ Note the differences in recorded timings. A small example of the challenges in relying on War Diaries for precise information. The timing difference might indicate the extremely long time it took to disembark over 1,000 troops. These units were all on HMS Doris. MG]

4th (London) Mtd Bde
"4:45 am. Arrived off SUVLA BAY … 6:30 am commenced to embark…..8:45 Landed. Shore was shelled immediately after landing."

1st/3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters)
"
Arrived at SUVLA BAY at 5:30 am. Landed in barges without opposition from the Turkish guns but were shelled soon after getting ashore. Dug ourselves in on the ridge on the North side of the BAY. Artillery duel between the Turks and the Battleships in the bay during the afternoon."

1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders)
"Landed at SUVLA BAY about 9:30 am unmolested. Shelled soon afterwards. No casualties"

1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders) History by A S Hamilton
:
" At 11 pm the Doris moved out with lights screened and guns crews closed up and steamed uneventfully through the night to anchor in Suvla Bay shortly after dawn.. Lighters and "beetles" at once came alongside, the latter being the capacious steel pontoons originally designed for Lord Fisher's Baltic scheme. Orders were piped and disembarkation began. The morning being misty, the landing was concealed from view of the enemy gunners. This was particularly fortunate as one of the "beetles" crammed as full as it would hold, stuck on a shoal for some time. The Bde got ashore safely;very few minutes afterwards though as it was awaiting orders by the roadside near the landing stage one Turkish gun fired several rounds at it but inflicted no loss. Eventually a move was made inland to the slopes of Karakol Dagh where all five Bdes dug in, but the 4th, after making a useful start was shifted uphill and had to begin anew...."

1st/1st County of London Yeomanry (Middlesex Hussars)
"4 am. Arrived at SUVLA BAY and commenced landing at 6 am; bivouaced by 9 am. Camp under shell fire but no casualties, men commenced to dig themselves in. (There was a lack of entrenching tools owing to these being put on a different boat to troops.)"

Capt Benn (Middlesex Hussars)
"Just before dawn on August 18
th
we arrived at Suvla. Again a boom was opened and we brought up in a bay ofexquisite beauty. Think of the most lovely part of the west coast of Scotland ;make the sea perfectly calm, perfectly transparent and deep blue ; imagine an idealAugust day; add an invigorating breeze, and you can picture our impression of thecoast of Gallipoli. For the first time since we had left Egypt's oppressive heatwe had now the physical ability to respond to the moral stimulus. There was theintense happiness of feeling that we must and could give our best to a cause supremelyworthwhile. It was only a matter of ten days since the first landing had been madeat Suvla Bay, so that the arrangements for disembarking were of an elementary kind.There was a pier, but it was not completed, and the road from it up the hill hardlyexisted. The skyline, which was only faintly illuminated with the early glow ofthe dawn, was jewelled with bursts of artillery, and occasionally a shell wouldfall in the water near our ship. Our disembarkation was effected by means of bigdumb barges covered with shell-proof hatches so as to protect the troops in theirshort passage from the transport. The ship kept as far as needful from thebeach, which was well within reach of the Turkish guns".

post-55873-0-12617800-1299460309.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 32.5 "2nd Mounted Division digging in after landing" - [Note this scene has been reproduced in a number of publications. The view is taken from the rising ground above 'A' Beach. The level of concentration of troops is interesting and would have provided a compelling artillery target. MG]

Selected War Diaries & Histories for 19th Aug:

4th (London) Mtd Bde
"The bivouac was situated on the southern slopes of GHAZI BABA PENINSULA about 1,000 yards from the end. Intermittent shelling. No casualties...."

1st/3rd County of London Yeomanry (Sharpshooters)
"Artillery duel soon after sunrise and continuingintermittently throughout the day. Improved dug-outs.......
"

1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders)
"Regt went into bivouac and made dug-outs"

1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders) History by A S Hamilton
:
" …With the whole bay overlooked and subjected to spasmodic shelling - and indeed, the same could be said of the entire Suvla front save only for a few blind spots which were already much over-crowded in consequence - dug-outs were everywhere necessary and for want of roofing and revetting material consisted of open pits with the loose earth banked around.The enemy's fire however was rarely serious as may be judged from the fact that in the three days the Bde had no casualties. The water-tanks near the foreshore were the favourite target and the only heavy "stuff" which came from "Asiatic Annie" or "Whistling Rufus" gave ample warning of its approach. Except for a party of Officers and NCOs who received instruction in bombing those crude jam tins , which theory required the thrower to hold for five seconds after lighting, but which the prevalence of prematures promted him to get rid of with the maximum of despatch - fatigues, digging, and Gallipoli's one boon, sea-bathing, occupied the time between the general stand to arms at dawn and dusk...."

1st/1st County of London Yeomanry (Middlesex Hussars)
"Remained in bivouac. Camp was shelled at intervals of 2 or 3 hours. No casualties in the Regt"

Sergt Walter Jackson, Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry.
"19 August: Pandemonium! Warships, artillery, and enemy all firing at once. Dug good shelter. Getting quite used to the guns, especially Beechy Bill. Doug wounded by shrapnel. Quiet night."

Diary of E T Cripps, Royal Gloucestershire Hussars Yeomanry "
SULVA BAY: AUGUST 19th, 1915 DIVISIONAL BIVOUAC My last letter was from the transport, which took us into a harbour in an island. We disembarked into small steamers. I went with the Brigade I was with at the time. Our Brigade went out a couple of hours before us, so I was anxious whether we should connect on landing. The boat we went in was oddly enough a Bristol pleasure steamer: much appreciated by the Bristol Troop! We put off at dark and steamed for five hours. I slept on the boards well, with my pack under my head. We landed.... as luck would have it, ran up against the Gloucestershire Transport, such as it is, and put my valise down and joined up. Very glad to see them I was, about sunrise yesterday morning. We marched on up from the landing-stage and lined up on the side of the hill, just above the landing -- very broken ground, with low, thorny scrub, rocks and stones on a clayey soil. They began to shell us, or rather the next landing party, so we dug ourselves into temporary graves! -- you can't call them anything else -- with headstones to protect us. Mine is just long enough to hold me, two feet deep, piled up all round with earth, a stone at my head, two pieces of wood I found floating in the sea in the middle of each side, and my mackintosh sheet as a sun shelter from the cross pieces to the ground, whichever way the sun is. The firing line is about three miles off, and everything goes and comes through our camp. The worst job is fetching water, every drop of which comes from Alexandria by ship, as they shell that part just below us on the landing all day. I went with Aubrey with the water party and a high explosive burst 10 yards away and another 20 yards a few seconds after. They make a great noise but do extraordinarily little damage. One of my troop had his trousers cut by a bit of the first, but only one man hurt. The Warwicks, not so lucky, have had several hit. After a few hours one takes no notice, and they don't bother me at all. The men are wonderful: they jeer when a shell doesn't explode and make jokes all the time. I bathed in the afternoon. Smith had a shell in the water when he was bathing. Ralph and I walked up the hill to about half-way to the trenches at the Pimple, and sat down and watched our Batteries and the Turks' shelling one another; it was a pretty sight... The warships chip in and fire big shells every now and again. Last night they had a big show, firing all night, and rifle fire very hot. They say we did well. We mess together, draw rations like the men, but have a few stores. Lime juice served out daily and a tot of rum at night. There are no flies here, but as it is not ground that has been used they may not have got here yet. It started to rain this morning at four, just enough to wet everything, but luckily stopped, and the sun soon dried it all -- the first rain I have seen since we left England. Smith is wonderful. He and I have kept fitter than anyone in the Regiment. He sews on buttons and gets water for me, which is an undertaking without being shelled as well .... Luckily it is a dry, cleanish country and you don't want a lot of washing, as water is the great difficulty. I had an old biscuit tin as a jug and while I was away bathing someone pinched it. It is so funny, one feels as if one had been accustomed to be under fire all one's life"

post-55873-0-46922300-1299460542.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 32.6 "Major Llewellyn Captain Hastings Regimental Headquarters Suvla Bay 18th August"

This is the one of the photos discussed on a previous thread. Maj Llewellyn was one of the Sqn OCs and was wounded in the hand on 21st August. Capt Hastings was the Adjutant (mentioned in the War diary on 14th - see below). I assume that the third person is an officer's 'servant'. The relaxed looking Llewellyn does not appear to be wearing regulation clothing - note the shirt and hat. Despite the limitations on baggage it does not appear to have stopped the Sharpshooters from carrying a considerable amount of impedimenta - note the washing bowl, valise, canteens etc....

post-55873-0-18773900-1299461013.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 33.1 "Major Rome Hon R Blyth Brigade Headquarters Suvla Bay 18th August" What intrigues me about this picture is that the people in it have no idea of the hell they are about to face the next day.

This was the last photo taken before the attack on Scimitar Hill. Maj Rome was the Brigade Major and Blyth a Staff Officer in the 4th (London) Mtd Bde. Any details on these men would be welcome..... Maj Rome is mentioned a few times in Weston Jarvis' personal diary. This photo is clearly taken from the lower slopes just above 'A' Beach West near Ghazi Baba. There appears to be a bicycle on the left of the trench. The Yeomanry had only been reorganised on 14th August and from the diary entries below we can get a taste of further chaos as some Regular Cavalry officers were elevated to higher responsibilities. Here, Bde Major Rome (pictured) is promoted to command one of the 'battalions'. His place is taken by the Adj of the Middlesex Hussars (W Nielson, 4th Hussars) , whose place in turn is taken by Capt Wedgwood Benn, whose troop is then commanded by another (un-named) Officer. Elsewhere the Bde Commander of the 3rd (Notts & Derby) Mtd Bde - Brig Gen P A Kenna VC (21st Lancers who charged at Omdurman with a certain Winston Churchill) was promoted to command the 2nd Mounted Division vice Gen Peyton (who was commanding the 10th (Irish) Div due to Gen Mahon's resignation). Kenna's place was taken by Col Sir John Milbanke VC (10th Hussars) and his place was filled in turn by Col Cole (South Notts Hussars) whose place in turn is taken by Maj Barber SNH. A long chain of 'over-promotion' was triggered due to the petulant resignation of Gen Mahon a few days earlier in the middle of the crisis of the Suvla campaign. A number of critical positions were now occupied by Officers with no experience in that rank, on the eve of their first day in battle.

http://en.wikipedia...._Aloysius_Kenna

http://en.wikipedia..../William_Peyton

http://en.wikipedia....e,_10th_Baronet

Selected extracts from War Diaries and Histories 19th & 20th Aug:

HQ 4th London Mtd Bde;
"
The bivouac was situated on the southern slopes of GHAZI BABA PENINSULA about 1,000 yards from the end. Intermittent shelling. No casualties....[20th Aug] Major Rome appointed to command a Bn and Capt W Neilson 4th Hussars took over the duties of Bde Major. 3pm Oderes received to prepare to move from bivouac…..5 pm orders received to move at 8 pm to LALA BABA… 8pm: The Div moved in the following order - Gen Kenna's Bde, Gen Taylor's Bde followed by the 30th Bde, 66th Fd Coy RE and Div HQ details. Div HQ remaining at A Beach SUVLA BAY until 10 am 21st Aug 1915 at which hour they were to move to LALA BABA. The march started in great confusion owing to the starting point selected being too near camp. The 4th Bde reached LALA BABA at 1 am and went into bivouac on the NW side of the peninsula. At daylight the Bde commenced to dig themselves in but the camp was not shelled during that day".

Sharpshooters.
Artillery duel soon after sunrise and continuing intermittently throughout the day. Improved dug-outs... [20th Aug] Artillery duel soon after sunrise. Marched at 8 pm in light marching order to LALA BABA arrived thee soon after midnight [?] And bivouaced".

Middlesex Hussars
.
In bivouac. Bde Maj left the Staff and Capt & Adj W Nielson takes over the duties of Bde Maj vice Maj Rome
[Note: Adj role taken over by Capt Wedgwood Benn - see other thread]
. Regt left SUVLA BAY 8 pm on 20th. Arrived at LALA BABA at 01:30 am. MG Section left Regt, reported to XI Div. Bivouac on Lala Baba.

Capt Benn (Middlesex Hussars)
"When we landed we were planted in a position which gave some shelter from the artillery fire, but our men were enjoined to get to work at once and dig themselves in for the next night. This was not an easy job, for, with a small entrenching tool, working on ground which is little else but rock lightly covered with soil, it is hard to make a bank big enough to afford adequate protection. The men were on a slope shelving towards the beach, and we officers on the hillside about a hundred feet above them. With the help of my batman I dug a splendid hole behind a rock. .... Our joint efforts produced a luxurious and well-protected villa residence on which we proudly carved in stone the name " Battle View."It rained, a glorious thing to desert dwellers. The noise and smell of it were delicious".

Roughriders (A S Hamilton)
"…With the whole bay overlooked and subjected to spasmodic shelling - and indeed, the same could be said of the entire Suvla front save only for a few blind spots which were already much over-crowded in consequence - dug-outs were everywhere necessary and for want of roofing and revetting material consisted of open pits with the loose earth banked around.The enemy's fire however was rarely serious as may be judged from the fact that in the three days the Bde had no casualties. The water-tanks near the foreshore were the favourite target and the only heavy "stuff" which came from "Asiatic Annie" or "Whistling Rufus" gave ample warning of its approach. Except for a party of Officers and NCOs who received instruction in bombing those crude jam tins , which theory required the thrower to hold for five seconds after lighting, but which the prevalence of prematures promted him to get rid of with the maximum of despatch - fatigues, digging, and Gallipoli's one boon, sea-bathing, occupied the time between the general stand to arms at dawn and dusk...…on the evening of the 20th, however, dumping rear-packs and bedding under guard and leaving a proportion of the officers in reserve the MG sections moved to Chocolate Hill whence they were distributed to the trench-line and the remainder of the Div trudged labouriously along the sandy beach to Lala Baba, where each man scraped himself a shallow trough which afforded protection from the chill night wind, if not from the enemy's fire. But that side of the ridge was fairly well screend from view and shells rarely landed on it. The digging-in which was resumed at daybreak, soon ceased and the men spent the morning bathing. It was the lull before the storm"

E T Cripps RGHY.
"DIVISIONAL BIVOUAC, AUGUST 20th, 1915. SULVA BAY. We are still here, but we hear a big show is to come off. I can't tell you where -- neither do I know. Ralph, Bertie (Palmer), Gething and I went up the hill, about a mile behind the firing line, and met a Brigadier up there, who showed us the position from the hill sky-line; so now we know how the land lies more or less. My Troop were out on fatigue all last night -- poor beggars! I had a night in my dug-out and slept well, except when a five-inch centipede walked in and wished to share my valise with me. I made short work of him. It is quite nice weather: warm in the day but with a nice breeze blowing, but cold at night. 4 p.m. -- I had a nice bathe with Aubrey and they only put one shell anywhere near us. This morning we had a lesson in bomb throwing. I am dying to have a go. One of us has to be left behind with each squadron, and I tossed up with Gething and lost! So I sha'n't see the beginning of it I suppose. Micky (Beach) is the other. I am so sorry I shall be parted from Smith: all servants go in the firing line.... I saw Teddy Gooch, Phil Wraughton and heaps of them in the Division to-day. I like my Troop the more I see of it; good material who will do well, I hope, when our turn comes.They have been well taught under Ralph, but, of course, this infantry job is so difficult to what we have been accustomed to. We live on "iron rations" -- bully beef, tea, sugar and biscuit; carry two days' supplies, and there is no room for anything else in the haversack."

post-55873-0-76788300-1299461882.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 33.2 "The Regiment Dug in on Chocolate Hill 23rd August". This was taken looking back across the Salt Lake plain that the Yeomanary had marched across under shellfire on the late afternoon of the 21st. Despite the accounts of constant shelling it is interesting to note the activity within the 'dead ground'. Men standing, mules resting etc. The Regiments would still be digging to improve their trenches having regrouped on the 22nd at Lala baba and then being sent back to Chocolate Hill. The Yeomanry were to hold the trenches from Chocolate Hill south through Tint's Corner to Susak Kuyu where they linked up with the Gurkhas for the rest of their campaign.

Selected Diary/History entries for 23rd-35th August.

Sharpshooters.
"Ordered to retire on LALA BABA at 2:30 am and which we reached at 4:15 am. Rested there all day. Casualties yesterday: Major Lewellyn and 2nd Lieut de Pass wounded and 40 NCS and men killed, wounded and missing.. Marched at 8 pm for CHOCOLATE HILL and dug ourselves in."[Total 42. Officers: 2 wounded, Ors 40 Killed, wounded or missing]

Capt Benn (Middlesex Hussars)
"After a day's rest, word arrived that we were to march back and occupy Chocolate Hill and the line before it. This manoeuvre was carried out that night without any interference from the enemy, an experience which suggested to most of us that by a similar night march the earlier loss of life might have been avoided ........Chocolate Hill at this period was covered with low bushes, and having been temporarily occupied from time to time in emergencies was in a dreadful condition of filth and disorder. However, the troops who were now sent to hold it soon made improvements. Bushes were cut down and the ground cleaned, and rows and rows of trenches and dug-outs were constructed. There was a daily shelling, and as these shells hadto come over the top of the hill and the shrapnel fell on the reverse slope,the beaten zone was considerably extended; in fact it seemed as if the hill was being scraped. However, as the dug-outs became better constructed and the men more used to the job the casualties grew less and less numerous. I remember one afternoon being in charge of a small fatigue party engaged in some digging work which had been ordered on the very top of the hill. We were not seasoned troop sand were all, as can readily be imagined, very impressionable. The particular spot where we were digging was well exposed to fire and was being spasmodically shelled; indeed I think the enemy could actually see us. In a bush alongside uswas a man, apparently asleep, covered with his overcoat. I took no notice of it at first, but as we went on and on with our work in relays of picks and shovels, the picks under cover while the shovels worked, and vice versa, Inoticed small parties of men arriving at and departing from the bush. When Isaw the number of sleeping men grow from one to four or five, I understood witha sickening feeling what was actually afoot and what we were really digging for. The spirit of the men, however, was unquenched. They were really merry.The difficulty was to check their desire to take risks. We were all happy. I suppose it was largely the reaction from occasional frights. The enemy guns, of course, had pet names, and their shelling excited admiration or derision accordingto its deserts. I can picture now a shell falling in a dug-out which wasoccupied by three men, all of whom seemed doomed to destruction. When the dust had blown away and they emerged, waving a shovel to indicate in the language ofthe butts "outer," Homeric cheers and laughter shook the hill. The experience of these weeks showed the noblest side of human nature, everyone putting forth his best in unselfishness and eagerness to help others. As to resentment against the enemy, that sense of hatred which is supposed to produce good fighting, there was none of it here. The shells and the bullets might have been earthquakes or tidal waves for the amount of personal rancour which they inspired in the breasts of those whom they sought to destroy. Besides, we were busy with some thrilling handicap races of country-bred"
tortoises.

Lt Cripps (RGHY)
"CHOCOLATE HILL AUGUST 23rd, 1915. I am up here, commanding the Squadron, on Chocolate Hill -- as all the officers and sergeants except my young sergeant, Philp, were hit or killed -- in the support trenches; in a dug-out with Micky, very deep and narrow, and the wind blows a shower of dust on us every few minutes. I joined the Regiment after a march round the shore to Lala Baba, where the Brigade was, and got there about half an hour before they started at dark to march up to the support trenches. They did the same at 3 p.m. the day before. The men on the hill -- some regiment of the 29th Division --said they behaved splendidly under very heavy shrapnel fire in columns of troops. Poor Gething killed! I tossed up with him to see whether he or I should go. We had about 65 casualties in the Regiment. Ben Smith is all right and, the sergeant says, behaved splendidly. My Sergeant Honey killed: I am sad about him. We got up to a hill and took over topping trenches made by the Engineers. We cooked some bacon this morning and made tea in our mess tins. Very good it was. The Regulars (29th Division) say the sight the day before yesterday of our men marching steadily under very heavy shelling was wonderful. Doing the same thing at night yesterday, we marched up without a shot fired, bar sniping. Just heard we are to move along into some other trenches. This will be good, as we shall get the Squadron more together. We were rather spread out in the dark last night. Such lovely scenery, spoilt by this game. We are looking at the sea in the rear, with battleships and an old camping ground and landing in the distance. All the men so cheerful: so are we. We all look beastly dirty and mud-stained. I managed to bring a sponge and towel, but water is the difficulty, and we mayn't use more than absolutely necessary for cooking".

Roughriders (A S Hamilton)
.
"...the Div marched uneventfully around the North of the lake and bivouaced at Chocolate Hill. In any account of Suvla, this hill looms large - far larger than its height of 150 ft would seem to warrant - but with its twin Green Hill it stood apart from the Anafarta Spur and isolation gave it both prominence and tactical importance. On its seaward face were crowded HQs, dumps, dug-outs and at the foot an aid post marked with a Red Cross flag to which it was rumoured the Turks objected when flown in such close proximity to combatants..... The protection the hill afforded was far from perfect and some part of it was shelled daily at dusk or dawn when men were likely to be moving about. On the morning after the Regt's arrival the "strafe" fell on the lower slopes where the officers wee standing in a group re-allotting dug-outs. Shrapnel spattered round them but the only casualty was Maj Knollys whose leg was smashed by a fuse. He was promptly sent off to the beach by ambulance accompanied but Father Day who later bought back word of a successful amputation. But after being evacuated to Alexandria, Maj Knollys was moved to England and died almost on arrival there. He was much beloved in the Regt and the loss of this ever-cheerful and gallant personality was deeply deplored by all ranks....... D Sqn thus being without officers, 2 Lt Kekewich came up from Suvla Base.... The next day (24th) when the officers left at Mudros rejoined, Capt Perry assumed command of D Sqn and 2 Lt Underwood took over duties of Adjt. At Chocolate Hill everyone led a "rabbit-like existence, venturing abroad only by night but biding close to his hole by day and scuttling to it at the first note of alarm". Blankets and some cloakes were sent up from the dump on pack-mules and much of the day was spent in sleep, knowing ones avoiding salvage and fatigue parties by taking their siesta in th heather on the exposed northern slopes. After dark, however, working parties and ration carriers left for the front line and the hillside was almost deserted.

4th (London) Mtd Bde.
"Chocolate Hill. 04:00 heavy firing was heard from the adavanced trenches and the Bde was warned to prepare to oppose them this however was not found necessary and no further move was made. Day - all was quiet. A large number of fatigue parties were called upon to gig in ammunition and carry rations to advanced trenches. That night the cloaks of the Bde were bought up. Up till now the men only having what they marched out with from SUVLA BAY"

post-55873-0-90714300-1299461154.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 33.4 "Waiting to Draw Water Chocolate Hill" Note the wide array of water carrying devices. Once again despite the intermittent shelling the troops here do not appear to be concerned about the level of concentration on the reverse slope of Chocolate Hill. This area seems to have been relatively well sheltered from the 'overs'.

post-55873-0-21850400-1299458859.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 33.5 " C Sqn Trenches" It is difficult to identify this trench, but it is likely to show one of the trenches in the area between Chocolate Hill - Tint's Corner - Susak Kuyu - Azmak Dere. Given the intense sunlight I suspect it is in late August or early September and also given the relaxed feel, it may well be in the reserve lines. Any thoughts would be welcome.

Sharpshooter's War Diary for late Aug:

28th Aug.
Very heavily shelled from 3:30 am till 6 am. Lt Marson, Cpl Withers and Tpr Terraine and Coombe-Robinson wounded. Shelling continued intermittently all day. Paraded at 8 pm and took most the line of trenches from GREEN HILL to TINTS CORNER held by the Westminster Dragoons and Herts Yeomanry

29th Aug
Quiet day except for snipers - many dead bodies close to our line but impossible to bury them under existing circumstances. Improvements made in trenches and dug-outs.

30th Aug
Tpr Beaumont shot dead through a loop hole in the early morning. Marched at 11:15 pm to take over the section near AZMAK DERE relieving 6th Bn [Royal] Dublin Fusiliers who in time take over our line.

31st Aug
Move completed at 2:15 am. The section in a very unfinished state and some hundreds of yards of trenches still to be dug to make the line complete. Cpl Filby severely wounded. Heavy Rifle fire all night.

Roughriders (A S Hamilton MM)

"
For several nights the Roughriders were employed in digging trenches in front of Scimitar Hill. Then, for a night or two they carried rations to the Middlesex and the
Sharpshooters
who had relieved the 5th Bde in the line south of Green Hill. But from the 31st when these two Regts moved further south they provided both cariers and working parties for them, the former pushing along the front line where the sentries took strange delight in warning those with the most awkward loads to "hurry along the next bit, a sniper got six there today!" and the latter toiling in the open on a new communication trench from Picadilly Circus where snipers were even more active and were commonly thought to get behind the British line. …

Neither then nor at any time was there any shortage of food, largely because rations were idented for several days ahead and the daily decline in numbers afforded a surplus. Nor was there any real lack of variety although jam was always apricot and the Maconochie ration proved too rich for most stomachs after a spell of semi-liquid bully and desiccated vegetables. "Extras" came only from parcels since there was no canteen at Suvla until September and then only with a poor stock: but supplies under this head were increased by retaining parcels for men no longer present with the Regt......

As food was plentiful, so was water scarce, especially for the first few days while the wells wre being developed and issues in consequence were maegre. Men became not only dirty but "bearded like the pard". "on one occasion, when Col Clarke went to enquire why his servant had been refused a canful, the RE Sgt Major in charge informed him 'I am sorry Sir; I didn't know it was for you. But you've no idea how careful I have to be. I gave two young fellows some water yestrerday and - would you believe it, Sir? - they actually washed themselves with it!'". …Furthermore, snipers covered the approaches to well-heads and compelled drawers to "step lively" until trenches were dug. The water generally was bad, although perfection to what men drank later in the front line and was undoubtedly responsible jointly with the flies and the unappetising concoctions prepared under the system of group messing then in force, for the rapidity with which disease gained a hold on the Regt.

post-55873-0-33032800-1299589903.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 33.6 "Lt Ferguson RE Lt Stearn RE B Squadron Trenches" I am not 100% ceratain of the spelling of the name of the second RE Officer. Possibly Stern, Stein and also he might not have been RE - see diary account below. This is one of my favourite photos. Some of the later photos show officers in a rigid parade like stance, not looking relaxed at all. These two are interesting. Lt Ferguson looks almost overdressed in the heat of Angust and has that relaxed confident feel. Compulsory woodbine. Lt Stearn has clearly come well equipped with his sunglasses. The picture has a natural feel and looks as if they were interuppted whilst observing where the next trench should be laid out. Weston Jarvis mentions the RE officers in his diary and has high praise for their professionalism. It is worth noting that as a long veteran of the Boer War Weston-Jarvis would have had at least some hard practical experience of warfare having served with the Rhodesia Regiment and then the 21st Battalion Imperial Yeomanry.

I am not sure the RE Officers would have been impressed with the standards of sandbagging in the previous photo, this photo and the next photo. As they say in the RE, "Ubique" loosely translated as "All Over the Place".

5th Mtd Bde.

28th Aug
"
Visited by Gen Nicholls and by RE Officers to Instruct us in bomb throwing. Gen Kenna (3rd Bde) on our right pushed out over a sap at night to straighten the lines. At 9 pm we marched back to CHOCOLATE HILL on relief by 4th Yeo Bde
"

Westminster Dragoons.

28th Aug
 
"A tremendous fusilade by te Turks commenced & lasted about an hour, we thought the Turks were attacking but nothing happened - our men behaved v well & we hardly fired a shot in return but waited. Cpl Williams died, one man wounded…. 1 pm Orders received that we would be relieved in the trenches by the London Mounted Bde. This they did at about 8.30 pm & we arrived back at CHOCOLATE HILL about 11:30 pm.
Lt F C Stern joined from Egypt recalled from leave in England"
29th Aug
 
"CHOCOLATE HILL considerably shelled but we were finally well dug in. Orders received to reduce our establishment of Officers to Col, Adj, 2 Sqn Leaders & 4 Subalterns - Officers per margin therfore sent back to SUVLA to report to Maj Yorke .
Lt Stern accidentally injured.
Lt Williamson goes sick with high temperature.
(Lt Stern accidentally wounded by RE Officer in practising bomb throwing.
Sir Ralph Gore, 2nd Lts Mumford, Rowe return to SUVLA"

post-55873-0-96309200-1299592013.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 34.1 "Lt Col A W Jarvis Maj O M Croshaw Azmak Dere"

The man himself, aged 60 in the front line trenches, looking very fit and healthy Lt Col Weston Jarvis appears to have been a larger than life character. Harrovian, an ex MP, Boer War veteran with interests in Rhodesia. A prolific diarist (watch this space) and photographer. Despite the incredible heat, note his immaculate dress. He is even wearing a tie. Standards. I would not liked to have been his orderly.

Major O M Croshaw was Oswald Mosely Croshaw. He is mentioned in the History of the Roughriders by A S Hamilton as being one of the reserve officers in the 1st/1st City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders). At this stage in the campaign, the fragments of Regiments had been melded into 'Composite Regiments' so it was not unusual to see a mixture of officers from different regiments in the same mess. Maj Croshaw was acting as Adjutant of this newly created body. Casualties and sickness had reduced the original regiments to shadows of their former selves and similar to the temporary amalgamations within the infantry Bdes, the Yeomanry Bdes did the same.

There is recorded an Lt Col O M Mosely who was in the Glasgow Yeomanry and later served and died with the 53rd Battalion AIF in France http://www.awm.gov.a.../unit_11240.asp. and was responsible for them being called the 'Whale Oil Guards' (see link)..... There is also a London gazette entry for Lt Oswald Mosely Croshaw being posted to the 19th Hussars from the 3rd Bn The Queen's (Riyal West Surrey) Regt in 1899. This might be the same person The London Gazette of sep 1916 also records the award of a DSO to Lt Col Oswald Mosley Crowshaw Yeo "For conspicuous gallantry in action.When attached to Brigade Headquarters, he twice voluntarily passed through a very heavy artillery and machine-gun barrage, and brought back accurate information of the situation" Research continues to establish if this is the same person. [Edit - They are the same person. A S Hamilton' s 'The History of the Roughriders' p.28 - "Major O M C Croshaw QOR Glasgow Yeomanry and late 19th Q A O Hussars joined as OC 'A' Squadron vice Capt Gunston..." MG].

Roughriders (A S Hamilton MM
) "
At the beginning of Sep the Div was reorganised. Its attachment to the 10th [Div] had terminated on 23rd Aug when Gen Peyton had resumed command. Since then the Scottish Horse Bde had been added and the Highland Mounted Bde was promised on arrival. In comparison with these the original brigades were extremely weak and diarrhoea, dysentery, jaundice and enteritis were further reducing numbers daily. Each of the five therefore became a composite regiment, the 1st, 2nd, and 5th forming a 1st Bde funder Brig-Gen Wiggin and the 3rd and 4th a 2nd Bde under Brig-Gen Taylor.
The 4th Composite Regt comprising three double-squandrons and a machine gun battery was placed under Lt Col Weston Jarvis of the Sharpshooters, while Maj Crowshaw
[sic]
came up from Suvla as its Adjutant."

Father Henry C Day SJ MC (RC Chaplain to 2nd Mouted Div) describing Weston Jarvis in Egypt in July 1915.
"Weston Jarvis, for all his brilliant vivacity was not a young man. By Army standards he was a veteran. He had served in the Matabele War (1896) and in the Boer War he held the rank of Major in the Rhodesian Regt (1899-1900) and afterwards commanded the 21st Regiment of Imperial Yeomanry
[Roughriders]
till the conclusion of the war when he received the CMG for his services. He next served on the staff of the Duke of Connaught in his mission to Egypt and India (1902-1903). Previosly he had represented King's Lynn in Parliament for several years (1886-1892). When I knew him in he was in his sixtieth year and probably the oldest man in the Regiment. The secret of his youthful vigour and keenness lay in his gifts of health and gaiety. He possessed these in abundance ; and his sources of interest and fund of enjoyment seemed well-nigh inexhaustible. Apart from the work and the regiment, there was all the past and the future to draw from - schooldays at Harrow, South Africa, his hair's breadth escapes, Canadian life with Lord Grey at Government House. dinner parties, shooting, steeplechase "point-to-point" races, fishing,
photography (he was never without his camera)
the prospects of the war, politics and plans for after the peace - these and countless other topics blended and glowed in the fire of the Colonel's enthusiasm.

Such spirit was electrical. It produced loyalty"esprit de corps" and discipline. Young subalterns described theColonel as a "topper" , whatever that meant and the men spoke of him as "our Colonel". This I took to be a certain sign of affection and pride. I think that we all felt that "our Colonel" would never willingly ask anyone to undertake risks or hardships which he was not prepared personally to encounter. Discipline too though rarely enforced by punishment was excellent. It rested on "esprit de corps", pride in the regiment and regard for its officers which needless to say is a far better foundation than fear. As the Colonel once told me he hated punishing his men, they were such fine fellows "every jack man." So too was he -"one of the best"

At dinner we had a 'shandy-gaff' club, of which besides the Colonel, Majors L K Jarvis his brother (a different type of man altogether but exceedingly liked), H LLewellyn DSO, Captains C Cutbill, Moxon RAMC a famous Harley Street Doctor and myself with one or two other members. What delightful evenings! What fun and rare stories! But the good things were not confined to our small coterie, and the EP tent rang with ripples and explosions of laughter as the CO jests went around the Mess"

post-55873-0-01541100-1299594560.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Phot 34.2 "Sergt Major Kent"

This is clearly in the reserve trenches in the are heading towards Lala Baba. Facing West towards the Pimple in the far distance. Interesting to note that the SSM is not wearing a sun helmet.

post-55873-0-17887400-1299595689.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 34.3 " Lt Col Clarke City of London Yeomanry"

Some hard evidence that officers dug trenches too. The City of London Regiment (Roughriders) were part of the same Bde as the Sharpshooters. .

post-55873-0-20432900-1299596036.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photo 34.4 "Brig Gen Taylor Brigade Headquarters"

Brig Gen A H M Taylor DSO was the Brigade Commander of the 4th (London) Mounted Bde which included the Sharpshooters, Roughriders and the Middlesex Hussars. This photo gives a good impression of the "rabbit like existence" that the men had become used to.

post-55873-0-47752900-1299662304.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Photos 34.6 " Major Croshaw shooting at 'Percy' the sniper" This photo also appears in The City of London Yeomanry (Roughriders) by A S Hamilton MM and is correctly attributed to Col Sir Weston Jarvis CMG MVO

There is an account in the Yeomanry diaries of the Turkish sniper nicknamed "Percy" in the vicinity of the barricade at Azmak Dere. There is some evidence that Percy could have been more than one sniper as repeated claims that he had been killed were soon followed by a resumption of the sniping. Percy caused considerable casualties. Percy's nest was eventually taken during one of the Scottish Yeomanry attacks to extend the Azmak Dere barricade.

Roughriders (A S Hamilton MM)
"No-man's land was 200-300 yards wide, covered with high grass and bush and infested with snipers. Of these none more deadly than "Percy" a group which caused the deaths of LCpl Edwards, Boyce and Woolrich and defied all attempts to oust it from its nest near the enemy line....."

post-55873-0-59625900-1299664398.jpg

Link to post
Share on other sites

Martin

Really excellent stuff; the pictures together with your digest of associated written material help to bring all those familiar names to life. I have not as yet seen the Weston Jarvis records and I have one query. There seems to be a gap between 18 and 23 August (picture refs 33.1 and 33.2). I take it the picture referencing is sequential and there is nothing in between?

John

Link to post
Share on other sites
There seems to be a gap between 18 and 23 August (picture refs 33.1 and 33.2). I take it the picture referencing is sequential and there is nothing in between? John

Hail Thales. Yes, the pictures are sequential. There is nothing between the 18th and 23rd in this particular album - all the photos in this thread are chronologically sequential, and as you know they were heavily involved in the advance and attack on Scimitar Hill on 21st and 22nd which might explain the gap. There are other photo albums in the Sharpshooters' archives which cover the period but the photos are much lower quality and quite a few of the photos are missing. I think the photos in the other albums are not by Weston Jarvis. I will post some once this thread is exhausted. The comments posted are very selective - there is a mountain of other material and I have a copy of Weston Jarvis' personal diary which I am slowly transcribing.

There are another 20 or so photos in this sequence but the quality drops as my camera slightly lost focus so I am going back to get better images of the original photos before I add more. A lot of the remainder are of senior officers standing in trenches in small groups, so a bit less interesting. I am thinking of omitting some as they are not particularly interesting. I will post a list of the descriptions so if anyone wants to see what General Bloggs looked like, I can post.

I am working on getting agreements from two other Yeomanry archives to do something similar to this thread - I hope to get a lot more (watch this space). In addition to this I think I have found 2 more sets of photos that have not been published before so they should be 'original' and new material. Regards MG

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 2 weeks later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
×
×
  • Create New...