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corisande

Major Carew - who was he

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corisande

Thanks very much

I have PMed the list. I appreciate that any joining before that date would not be on it

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IPT
corisande

Yes, I think it is generally accepted that the British officers in the Palestine Gendarmerie came mainly from officers who had served in Ireland

I have never seen a write up that quantifies this in any way

They could have come from ADRIC, from serving officers in Intelligence in Ireland or indeed from "Black and Tans". As I understand it (hazily!) there were not that many British officers to start with in the Palestine Gendarmerie - I should have a better idea once PeterMc gets back to me on the list of Intelligence officers I sent him

These men were not Irish, but ex-officers who had volunteered for service in Ireland in order to have a job, and the way to continue the job once the work in Ireland finished was to go to Palestine, using the "old boy" net if necessary

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Peter Mc

The names of the secret service men you supplied do not, with the exception of Carew, appear on the list I have. The list was first compiled on 17 July 1922 and shows that the composition of the British Section of the Palestine Gendarmerie. The officer ranks comprise of one Colonel, two Lt-Cols, 11 Majors, 15 Captains and 12 Lieutenants (41 in all). With the exception of 15 of these men (including Carew) all had previous service in the RIC or Auxiliary Division RIC. A second list compiled on 20 November 1922 shows that the officer class had reduced to one Lt Col, 2 Majors, 5 Captains and 9 Lieutenants (17 total).

A very small number of the officers were Irish, many more of the other ranks certainly were.

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corisande

OK thanks for looking it up

As a matter of interest where did you come across the list

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corisande

That was well spotted. Trouble is it raises another mystery on the children Frank Reginald Carew and Roy Hallowell Carew. Are they from the same mother

  1. I cannot find them in 1891 census, they are not with their mother
  2. BMD gives Frank Reginald born Eton in Apr/Jun 1888
  3. BMD gives Roy Hallowell born in Jan/Mar 1889 in Kensington
  4. so its is just possible that they have same mother
  5. the two boys are in the same school, Burlington House in 1901 census

On balance they probably were, but neither mother nor father seems to have had too much to do with them

I assume the Rubber planter has just added the Hallowell to his name

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IPT

Well, Roy Hallowell Carew is baptised as Edith's child. It goes without saying that he was baptised with a completely different name, "Roy St Fere Carew" (remember Mr Vaile?). He later uses his alternative moniker when the mood takes him.

The address given is 11 Bankston Gardens, Kensington.

http://search.ancestry.co.uk/cgi-bin/sse.dll?rank=1&new=1&MSAV=1&msT=1&gss=angs-g&gsfn=roy&gsfn_x=XO&gsln=carew&gsln_x=XO&81004010__date_x=1&uidh=7u6&rs_81004010__date=1&pcat=ROOT_CATEGORY&h=5553760&recoff=1+4+25+39&db=LMAbirths&indiv=1

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corisande
Partnership which has for some time past been carried on by Reginald Francis St. Fere Vaile and Frank Murray Maxwell Hallowell Carew,

That is a very astute observation. Makes you wonder doesn't it!

The Carew family seem to get up each morning and try a new name at random!

Mr Vaile seems a strange a character as Carew, 1901 census gives him as a banker born 37degrees S and 11 degrees west (it is given more exactly). Seems to be somewhere off Tristan da Cunha in the south Atlantic Ocean, at latitude 37°S, longitude 12°W.

And son Roy is a chip off the old block - bankrupt in 1949

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IPT

Another frustrating snippet view from an article called "Policing Palestine" by James Barker. I can't prove it's our man but i'd say there's a good chance;

"Carew [the local British Gendarmerie commander] then ordered them to unfix bayonets and clear the streets with butt ends if necessary. In 2 minutes the show was over and not a Nablusie to be seen, except those lying on the floor! No further trouble anywhere and [Wyndham] Deedes [sir Herbert Samuel's Chief Secretary] told me later in the day that it had had a very good effect all over Palestine."

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corisande
I can't prove it's our man but I'd say there's a good chance;

Given that our man was in Palestine at that time, odds on that it is him. Chances of 2 Carews in less than 100 British officers there is pretty remote.

Makes one realise that the poor citizens of Nablus have been suffering bayonets, rifle butts and worse for nearly a century now,

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ianw

A most enjoyable thread. I think I would have enjoyed a pint or maybe a large G&T with Carew in the 30s - a great fund of stories no doubt.

These men seem to be of a type - personally brave, bold, unscrupulous, good under pressure etc. I think such men are limited in number which explains why they may move from trouble spot to trouble spot. And of course, the ladies love 'em.

Do we have a photo of Carew?

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corisande
Do we have a photo of Carew?

You must be joking. He went to a great deal of trouble to obliterate his past, changed his name. The photo of his wife is there.

I wish I could get a photo of Carew, I have tried to find descendants, but have failed - the sons also changed names, were in bankruptcy courts, etc, so the family today probably have a completely different surname !

And of course, the ladies love 'em

Yes, I particularly like his entry in 1901 census, in which he is staying at British Hotel 82/83 Jermyn St, London with a "Rose Carew aged 21". (it is not a sister, no Rose Carew born around 1880). Carew was married to someone else at the time. It's not often that people get caught forever in the spotlight of history in this way

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ianw

Yes, there is little doubt that the man was a cad and a bounder.

Do we have details of his will? Interesting to see what he may have left and to whom.

I would have thought that he would have been photographed officially at some stage - though I suppose such files may well have been destroyed.

Ironic that the sale of any one of those £750 Northwood houses from his land speculation days would leave you comfortable for life - even in these days of falling house prices. He just mis-timed things by a few years.

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corisande
Do we have details of his will? Interesting to see what he may have left and to whom.

Ancestry "All England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations),1861-1941 " only runs to 1941 and he died 1943

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ianw

Ancestry "All England & Wales, National Probate Calendar (Index of Wills and Administrations),1861-1941 " only runs to 1941 and he died 1943

Will the 1943 will be physically available for reference somewhere?

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corisande

I assume so, but really have no idea - I have no English ancestors, so have never had to acquire knowledge on things like English Wills

Presumably Ancestry are only allowed to publish up to 1940 because of a 70 year clause or whatever. This is Ancestry's page, and they do not say why

No doubt a more erudite reader of this forum than I, can explain

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Robert Dale

I'm certainly NOT more erudite - but it's quite possible to get hold of post 1940 wills (I have).

GEN-UKI says "Post-1858 wills for England and Wales can be consulted at the Probate Dept of The Principal Registry Family Division (http://www.hmcourts-...ms/1226.htm#004): Probate Search Room, First Avenue House, 42-49 High Holborn, London, WC1V 6NP.

HMCS says : "Once you know when and where a grant [was] issued, you can have copies of the grant and the Will (if any). You may order copies at First Avenue House or any District Probate Registry and some Sub-Registries. You should state the full name of the deceased, the date of the grant, the Registry where it issued, what copies you want and pay the appropriate fee. You may order copies by post or by attending any Registry. Telephone or email orders cannot be accepted. "

Robert

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ianw

Thanks Robert.

It's just that I am intrigued by Carew and am often in Central London with a bit of time to kill between meetings.

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corisande

The facts as I have them on his death are

The Times reports the death on the 28th January 1943 of Major F Hallowell Carew OBE MC son of the late Francis Hallowell Carew of Beddington Park. Private funeral and no other details. The death of Frank M M H Carew was registered in Berkhamstead in the March Qtr of 1943, age 77

his death is registered as Frank M M H Carew, full name "Frank Murray Maxwell Hallowell Carew" born 1866

However as you know his name does wander and his will could have been any combination of the above

I am not sure how his relationship with his two sons worked out. In 1912 and 1913 Frank Reginald Carew cites his grandmother as his closest relative in ships papers. Interesting to see how much he left and to whom he left it.

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Robert Dale

Thanks Robert.

It's just that I am intrigued by Carew and am often in Central London with a bit of time to kill between meetings.

Indeed! He sounds like a character straight out of John Buchan (albeit a bit more of a cad - perhaps!)

Good luck with the will.

Robert

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IPT

Regarding the 1894 Ada Waterer/Florence Harriett marriage, it occurred to me that whichever lady did not marry Reuben Jacobs must have became Carew's wife. Therefore, I expected to find either Ada Jacobs or Florence Jacobs in the 1901 census or in the registered deaths, and be able to rule them out. Obviously, no such luck.

In 1901, there is a Harriet Carew, married, living alone in Carnaby Street who may be a possible. If so, she is having to work as a tailoress.

On the other hand, the likeliest Ada Waterer was the daughter of a greyhound trainer which sounds right up Carew's street.

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ianw

On the other hand, the likeliest Ada Waterer was the daughter of a greyhound trainer which sounds right up Carew's street.

Quite so, IPT.

"Darling , of course you mean more to me than just the tips on the dogs - but your pater's thoughts on the 7.30 at Walthamstow wouldn't be unwelcome."

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corisande

Gee, you have got me going again on the Major, but not getting anywhere

The only other clue on the ladies in his life, is the lady in the divorce case "Mrs A Seymour*.

I tried without success to try to nail her down as being nee Ana Waterer

The original wife married Mr. Loftus Earle who was named in some of the proceeding, but as afar as I can see reverted to Carew later in life.

The Major describes himself as "married" in 1911 census, even though he is alone in the household.

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headgardener

Regarding this man's Will, I pass the Probate Dept in Holborn almost every day on the way to work, I started a bit late today, so I jumped off the bus to take a look.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, there is no record of a Frank Carew, Frank Hallowell Carew, Frank Hallowell-Carew, or a Hallowell Carew (or any possibble variation of the spelling of the name 'Hallowell') during the years 1943 to 1957 (I couldn't quite remember his year of death, though I recalled that it was during WW2, so I also checked 1939 to 1942). The only names that I came up with were Reginald Philip Hallowell-Carew of Okehampton, Ellen Margaret Isabella Hallowell-Carew of Exmouth, Margaret Maud Hallowell-Carew, Louisa Hallowell-Carew of Luton, Gertrude Hallowell-Carew, Sarah Ann Hallowell-Carew of Innellan, Grace Mary Hallowell-Carew ("or Taylor" it said in the register - very mysterious) and Iris Hallowell-Carew. I took their details (some of them were executors of the other's wills). Let me know if any of them are of iterest.

Regarding your man, I can only surmise that;

he wasn't resident in England when he died, or that his property wasn't held or owned in England (the Probate Dept only covers England and Wales)

he didn't own enough property (or at least not in his own name) for his relatives to need to apply for probate.

there was a delay in his next-of-kin (or debtors...!) applying for probate, and maybe his name appears sometime after 1957 (uncommon, but it did/does happen - I have come across delays of 10 years or more)

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