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Remembered Today:

What WW1 books are you reading?


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37 minutes ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

The Anathemata perhaps?

Quite probably :).

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On 22/04/2021 at 14:27, The Scorer said:

"Jacqueline's Winspear's "The care and management of lies", which in turn I highly recommend) "

 

I'm sure that you're aware (but others might not know) that this is one of a series of mysteries featuring a female private detective, Masie Dobbs. They're not all connected with the First World War, but there are echoes of what happened to her during the war in all of them.  I've read them all, and I think that they're good. 

Got them all too, except the very latest ... 

 

Love them!!! 

 

M.

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21 hours ago, David Filsell said:

Birdsong. Once described to me as Birdshite.

 

It's not THAT bad... 

The movie ... that's something else... 

 

M.

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The Scorer
8 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

Got them all too, except the very latest ... 

 

Love them!!! 

 

M.

 

I think that I'm up to date, but if I'm not, I will be soon!

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David Filsell

Covenent with Death is one of the exceptions. I am just re- reading it. It is outstanding. Written by a journalist who researched deeply who later became a highly prolific and successful author it is the exception which proves the rule - and copies are available easily and cheaply on the internet. I can add another useless work- its about a boy who had a horse, lost a horse and got his  horse back - while a war went on!

Regards

David

Edited by David Filsell
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Nearly all of his books irritate me profoundly, and he seems to have cornered the market in children's books about the Great War.

 

I will put in a good word, though, for Mary Rayner's book for younger children, The echoing green.

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One of my first post lockdown forays into a charity shop, produced a near mint copy of

'Passchendaele - Unseen Panoramas' by Peter Barton.  A weighty volume indeed,

already have his 'Battlefields of the First World War' in the same format.

 

Mike.

Edited by MikeyH
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  • 3 weeks later...
Marilyne

Hi all, 

 

I was hesitating today in Zonnebeke whether to get a copy of Andrew Rawson's "The Passchendaele Campaign" or not. 

I spent a part of the time we had a Koklikoo for coffee looking for references and got mixed signals in reviews from his other books in the series going from "good & interesting" to "nothing new to learn in that". 

Did I make the good decision NOT to take the book (yet??) 

 

M.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Just been reading (online so I didn't have to pay for it) Percy F. Westerman's 'With Beatty off Jutland' (1920).

 

Oh dear oh dear oh dear.

 

Experience of the Battle of Jutland crow-barred in between not one, not two, but three German spy plots with a great deal of emphasis on Hun frightfulness and examples of Kultur. Not to mention a sub-lieutenant leaping overboard to save an AB and a warship stopping to pick them up...

 

Great cover though.

 

 

Screenshot_20210611_203516.jpg

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593jones
3 hours ago, seaJane said:

Just been reading (online so I didn't have to pay for it) Percy F. Westerman's 'With Beatty off Jutland' (1920).

 

Oh dear oh dear oh dear.

 

Experience of the Battle of Jutland crow-barred in between not one, not two, but three German spy plots with a great deal of emphasis on Hun frightfulness and examples of Kultur. Not to mention a sub-lieutenant leaping overboard to save an AB and a warship stopping to pick them up...

 

Great cover though.

 

 

Screenshot_20210611_203516.jpg

 

I wonder if that's one of the books Jim Prideaux read to the boys at the boarding school?

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1 hour ago, 593jones said:

 

I wonder if that's one of the books Jim Prideaux read to the boys at the boarding school?

I had to look that up! I'm afraid my Le Carré reading is limited to The Spy Who Came in From the Cold...

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Michelle Young

I've just read As From Kemmel Hill by A Behrend. A great read, not sure why this little book has escaped my attention for so many years. 

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593jones
12 hours ago, seaJane said:

I had to look that up! I'm afraid my Le Carré reading is limited to The Spy Who Came in From the Cold...

 

To be honest, I find Le Carre very variable in his writing.  Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy was superb, but I just couldn't get into The Honourable Schoolboy or A Perfect Spy, and A Legacy of Spies was just bizarre.  It was part of the Circus series, but appeared to be in a parallel universe, with the characters bearing only a passing resemblance to their original incarnations.  Very strange.

Edited by 593jones
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