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Remembered Today:

What WW1 books are you reading?


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@David Ridgus

@Maureene

Found it on kindl for 2€ and followed your advise... it's now somewhere down on the list, I guess I'll come to it one day. 

thanks for the tip both of you! 

 

M.

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23 hours ago, GWF1967 said:
23 hours ago, pjwmacro said:

y any chance?

I couldn’t say. I have yet to read it and unfortunately it’s not indexed. 

 

22 hours ago, The Scorer said:

The name doesn't ring a bell, but it's quite a while since I read it - sorry.

Thank you both.

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"I have seen Sordet's cavalry march through Inchy on the eve of Le Cateau, I have seen the Iron Corps of France march through the square of Ypres, I have seen the 1st Canadian Division marching to St Julien before the gas attack, I have seen Indian troops going into action for the first time on European soil, I have seen Australians on their way to attack Poziers, but I have no remembrance to equal that of the old regiments of the "B.E.F" marching to the battle of Mons." from "The Breaking of the Storm" by C.A.L Brownlow (Methuen & Co 1918).

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Dust Jacket Collector
4 minutes ago, Ghazala said:

 

"I have seen Sordet's cavalry march through Inchy on the eve of Le Cateau, I have seen the Iron Corps of France march through the square of Ypres, I have seen the 1st Canadian Division marching to St Julien before the gas attack, I have seen Indian troops going into action for the first time on European soil, I have seen Australians on their way to attack Poziers, but I have no remembrance to equal that of the old regiments of the "B.E.F" marching to the battle of Mons." from "The Breaking of the Storm" by C.A.L Brownlow (Methuen & Co 1918).

One of the great classics. Has anyone reprinted it?

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37 minutes ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

One of the great classics. Has anyone reprinted it?

image.png.66b472d832881a5eca3a383185df08c4.png

 

Reprinted 4 years ago. I know this is probably anathema to you DJC but I have it on Kindle

 

David

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Dust Jacket Collector
15 minutes ago, David Ridgus said:

 

Reprinted 4 years ago. I know this is probably anathema to you DJC but I have it on Kindle

 

David

Just glad to see it available again. Have to admit I do have a few books on my iPad!

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3 minutes ago, Dust Jacket Collector said:

Just glad to see it available again. Have to admit I do have a few books on my iPad!

Even Homer nods!!

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Considering the anniversary of the Unknown Soldier coming up, decided to take up "The Flag" once more. I think it is fitting reading for this WE leading up to Remembrance Day, in between my readings on deploying VJTF and consorts. 

 

M.

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A stroke of luck: teacher for Land Ops wants us to read the chapter about von Moltke in Barrett's "The Swordbearers" ... 

 

M.

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Just finished reading 'The Tale of a Casualty Clearing Station' by Colonel F.A Symonds ( 'A Royal Field Leech ' ) who was ADMS to the 9th Scottish division

when he was killed on 30th April 1917 . It was published by William Blackwood & Sons in 1917 and covers the trials and tribulations of his unnamed CC.S

(or clearing hospital as it was then called ) from Mons until Festubert in May 1915 . It's available to read on line as well if you can't find a copy :whistle: 

 

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Have just finished "July 1914 Countdown to War" by Sean McMeekin, Iconbooks/net. 

 

Well worth the time spent. It gives insight in great detail to the political and diplomatic shenanigans that led up to the outbreak of the great War.

 

In just a month there were so many personal mistakes, miscommunications, misconceptions and plain errors of judgement that Europe simply staggered towards war.

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You could have helped me out yesterday... we've been analyding the concept of mission command through the cse study of the Schlieffen plan and I was asked by the African students in our group if I could "quickly explain" how one single gunshot led to the war. eeeuuuh.... do you have an hour or five to kill???? 

I managed to keep it under ten minutes ... 

 

rather interesting discussion with the guys... 

 

M.

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17 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

I managed to keep it under ten minutes ... 

 

That's some achievement. Do you still need any thoughts on Moltke the younger? I've got an email on the go if you do....

 

Pete.

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4 minutes ago, Fattyowls said:

 

Do you still need any thoughts on Moltke the younger? I've got an email on the go if you do....

 

Pete.

 

We actually nailed it!! 

Well, our german colleague presented our group work (90% Bear's)... 

I'll post it in the WIT... 

 

M. 

 

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Just now, Marilyne said:

We actually nailed it!! 

 

Excellent. I was going to talk about the impact of breeding against environment and compare it with the British tendency to favour the former (which is encapsulated by the phrases "the old boy network - where old boy is an old boy of a good public (ie private) school, "a chip off the old block" and "I was at school with your father"). The other thing that I was thinking about was the unusual degree of autonomy that Moltke's army commanders had, and that communication in 1914 simply couldn't keep up in a fast changing situation. There's an interesting comparison with Heinz Guderian in 1940 over much the same ground.

 

Pete.

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the point was actually to show the importance on Mission Command. 

Worked out fine actually. the first point was encapsulated in the "mascot" function of Moltke as WII saw him. 

And we all agree that C2 during the early weeks of the war was crap!! 

 

M.

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46 minutes ago, Marilyne said:

(90% Bear's)...

 

Is there a danger that bear might end up running Belgium's mighty military machine rather than yourself? Or do you see yourself as a future military partnership, like Hindenburg and Ludendorf, or Plumer and Harrington?

 

I need to work my way back through this thread and read up on 1914, my focus recently has been on the Meuse rather than the Marne.....

 

Pete.

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1 minute ago, Fattyowls said:

 

 Hindenburg and Ludendorf

 

 

interesting.... 

 

I'll always play Second Fiddle I guess... 

 

I also need to read up on 1914 ... but above all I need my Research Paper done with so that I can ONE: clean up my notes and my files and files of documentation (15years worth of stuff... that's 8 (EIGHT) big maps full of notes, some handwritten, some printed... don't ask) and then TWO: continue reading and continue filling maps... :blink::blink:

 

M.

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This might sound self aggrandizing and it probably is, with the recent review the journal of military history described it as taking the German General Staff to the woodshed. Based on the military analysis of the difference between Schlieffen and Moltke’s plans. It has been amazingly well received [see Stand To!! Review by Jack Sheldon] and it might help your research.307270333_coverbook5.jpg.7ad6e6339f16dd2dbf88f9146dd279d1.jpg

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Thanks Joe, that's on the list, much appreciated. And I don't think that self aggrandisation is in evidence, if it's good enough for Jack who am I to argue.

 

Pete.

 

P.S. Is Janet related to you or is it just a coincidence?

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1 minute ago, joerookery said:

The other Colonel Robinson, Janet, I am fortunate to say is my wife.

 

Thanks Joe, I know of one other husband and wife colonel partnership, I was interested to know if either had to salute the other.......

 

Pete.

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2 minutes ago, joerookery said:

The other Colonel Robinson, Janet, I am fortunate to say is my wife.

 

I'll consider the title, 

 

Respectfully, colonels, 

 

a lowly major en route to become GS... 

 

.M

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