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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Taking the MIC


Skipman

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It's everywhere

" so can someone wiser than I confirm that Drv Nanhu should have an MIC recording these medals? "

" I have been unable to locate an MIC for him or any military reference on Ancestry. "

" Lieutenant Colonel of 8th (Isle of Wight Rifles) Hampshire Regiment in July 1913 and has an MIC went to Gallipoli in 1915. "

etc

Mike

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I would write "a MIC" because I would read MIC as "medal index card", not as a word in its own right. The same question arises with NCO.

Actually, I would probably avoid it altogether by writing "his MIC" or "the MIC". The beauty of English is that there is almost always another way to write or say something to avoid awkward phrasing or syntax.

Ron

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I would write "a MIC" because I would read MIC as "medal index card", not as a word in its own right. The same question arises with NCO.

Ron

Is it not all just to do with the letter that follows ie an N.C.O, or a non commissioned officer. a MIC or a medal index card

Mike

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Mike

Yes, IMO again.

But then my academic study of the English language culminates in a just scraped through "O" level in 1966 (one of my prized four).

The language, both written and spoken, develops over time so what may have been relevent half a century ago may no longer be the case. Here's a question, then - in speech, would people say "an MIC"?

John

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The letter N is named and pronounced "en", hence an N.C.O.

The letter M is very similarly named and pronounced "em", and hence an M.I.C.

Quite simply, an is used before vowels (and sometimes before h in an unaccented syllable e.g. an historian, but that is another story), and thus an "em".

When talking about a Military Medal, it is an MM, not a MM.

265

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I dunno, but I write "A MiC", small i. Same as I write "A MiD".

But then again, is it "An MiD", or "A MiD"?

Trev

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The letter N is named and pronounced "en", hence an N.C.O. I agree.

The letter M is very similarly named and pronounced "em", and hence an M.I.C. I disagree, it should be a MIC.

When talking about a Military Medal, it is an MM, not a MM. It is a Military Medal, and an MM.

I'm not a Mick, or an Mick, I'm Scottish.

Mike

265

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As an unbiased external judge, I suspect it all depends on how you read 'MIC' in your head. Pretty much as SPOF (is that S.P.O.F. or spof??) says in Post #9

If it's one word (mic) then I suggest it should be 'a mic', but if it's read as a sequence of letters (M.I.C), then it would be 'an M.I.C.'

So you can't mix&match.
So no 'a M.I.C.', and no 'an Mic'

Like it's always 'an R.A.F. pilot', or 'a raf pilot'

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Perhaps we should return to the traditional practice of indicating abbreviations by using full stops: "an M.I.C." makes it clear that MIC is to be read as three separate letters.

Ron

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Agree with all that Dai, except " irag' epends " is that Welsh?

Mike

Sorry I was writing it on my smart phone, when somehow the cursor shifted back a few lines without me noticing.

I noticed the error after posting, and then corrected it.

But not quickly enough evidently...

Perhaps we should return to the traditional practice of indicating abbreviations by using full stops: "an M.I.C." makes it clear that MIC is to be read as three separate letters.

Ron

Hmmm.

I think whether the poster puts "an MIC" or "a MIC", (or variants) both have to be accepted as possibly being correct, as the reader can't possibly know how the poster intended it to sound, and it's a bit impractical to cover every eventuality.

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Ah ! The ever divergent and mutating language we all call English. It allows for all manner of use and change. That's why crisp is what I hope my potato chip to be; bowler is the guy trying to knock down all ten pins not a hat or a cricket player; sh*g is a type of carpet (trying to preserve politeness); biscuits are the little round bread rolls My Mother made for Sunday dinner; Ma'am is a respectful salutation to ladies, not just the Queen; ad infinitum. At least we are all understandable and correct at least some of the time. ( smiley emoji insert if I knew how to use them).

Trying to speak and read as good or best or well as possible, Bif

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Should it not be " a MIC " not "an MIC " also " a Hotel " not " an Hotel " " an " only appropriate if 'H' is silent :mellow:

Mike

I believe the correct term is " An H'otel", with a silent H.
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