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First World War Lectures/Presentations/Discussions on YouTube


The Ibis

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This is really good one...The Fighter Pilot with a Thousand Faces: The Birth of the Knights of the Air presented by Michael Hankins.

 

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Streamed live on Nov 2, 2018

The airplane began the First World War as primarily a reconnaissance tool, but through the years of bitter fighting, it evolved quickly. By 1918, aircraft in many shapes and sizes performed a variety of roles including bombing, ground support, interdiction and air-to-air combat. Intertwined with this evolution in technology was a similar evolution in culture. Pilots that focused on “pursuit” (air-to-air combat), began developing their own subculture. Partly as a response to the bleak conditions of trench warfare on the ground, pursuit pilots valued their independence and aggressiveness, and tended to see themselves as heroes in the mold of Greek myths or medieval knights. This culture was a constructed abstraction of reality. For some it was a veneer to cover the fears associated with flying, or the pain of losing comrades, and in some cases it was an accurate reflection of individual personalities. For all involved, this culture—itself a romanticization of reality—was a call back to a romanticized past. Yet it was powerful force that both brought pursuit pilots together and separated them from other types of fliers and soldiers. The main tenets of the subculture of the “knights of the air” that was formed in the First World War have been passed down through the decades and remain the key elements of fighter pilot culture 100 years later.

Dr. Michael Hankins, Assistant Professor of Strategy at the U.S. Air Force's eSchool of Graduate PME, the distance learning component of the Air Command and Staff College

Lecture given as part of the National WWI Museum and Memorial's 2018 Symposium, 1918: Crucible of War.

 

 

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Writing the global history of a forgotten army: The Allied armies of the Orient in WWI Greece by Anastassios Anastassiadis

 

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Published on Jan 31, 2019

Lecture by Anastassios Anastassiadis (Associate Professor of History & Phrixos B. Papachristidis chair in Modern Greek Studies, History & Classical Studies Department, McGill University) - 16 January 2019

“Writing the global history of a forgotten army: The Allied armies of the Orient in WWI Greece”

More than 600,000 Entente soldiers from around the world were at one point camped in WWI Greece. Between 1916 and 1918, there were 250,000 of them stationed in and around Thessaloniki, a city of 170,000 inhabitants at the time.

However, the story of these Allied Armies has mostly been cast to oblivion, despite not only their role in terms of the outcome of the war but also their huge impact in terms of the biopolitics, meaning their contacts with the civilian population in a variety of forms: infrastructure, transportation, housing and food logistics, medical care and hygiene and even governance.

Based on a current multi-partner research project, this talk will address some of those points and also touch upon the reasons this presence disappeared from the collective memory, both in Greece and in certain Allied countries like France.

 

 

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The Great War: Its End and Effects, Lecture by Professor Annika Mombauer

 

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Published on Feb 15, 2019

12 February 2019, “Changing German Views of the Great War”, Annika Mombauer, Professor of Modern European History, Open University. The lecture was sponsored by Christ Church Cathedral and the McDonald Centre for Theology, Ethics, and Public Life, Oxford.

 

 

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The Armenian Legionnaires: Sacrifice and Betrayal in World War I by Susan Pattie.

 

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Published on Mar 29, 2019

Susan Paul Pattie, Honorary Senior Research Associate at the University College London
Recorded on March 20, 2019.

 

Following the devastation resulting from the 1915 Armenian Genocide in the Ottoman Empire, the survivors of the massacres were dispersed across the Middle East, Europe and North and South America. Not content with watching World War I silently from the sidelines, a large number of Armenian volunteers joined the Légion d'Orient. They were trained in Cyprus and fought courageously in Palestine alongside Allied commander General Allenby, eventually playing a crucial role in defeating the German and Ottoman forces in Palestine at the Battle of Arara in September 1918. The Armenian legionnaires signed up on the understanding that they would be fighting in Syria and Turkey, and, should the Allies be successful, they would be part of an occupying army in their old homelands, laying the foundation for a self-governing Armenian state.

Susan Pattie describes the motivations and dreams of the Armenian Legionnaires and their ultimate betrayal as the French and the British shifted their priorities, leaving their ancestral homelands to the emerging Republic of Turkey. Complete with eyewitness accounts, letters and photographs, this book provides an insight into relations between the Great Powers through the lens of a small, vulnerable people caught in a war that was not their own, but which had already destroyed their known world.

Copies of "The Armenian Legionnaires" will be available for purchase (cash only) at the event.

Susan Pattie, former Director of the Armenian Institute in London is currently leader of the Pilot Project of the Armenian Diaspora Survey, funded by the Gulbenkian Foundation. She holds a PhD in Anthropology from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor.

 

 

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The WFA just posted a 2016 lecture by Gary Sheffied entitled "The Battle of the Somme reassessed" that might be of interest.

 

 

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Great finds, thank you.

 

Pete.

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2 hours ago, The Ibis said:

The WFA just posted a 2016 lecture by Gary Sheffied entitled "The Battle of the Somme reassessed" that might be of interest.

Just watched this in its entirety.  Very worthwhile and thanks for posting.

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You're most welcome, Fattyowls and WhiteStarLine.

 

Here is a lecture on Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck. It is part of the Ft. Leavenworth series at the Dole Institute. Mark Hull is the presenter. I haven't watched this one.

 

 

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David Tattersfield

The WFA youtube channel (link here  YouTube ) has just had uploaded to it a number of new videos. 

 

We have  'The World of the RAMC in WW1' by Jessica Myers 

 

 

Then FIVE videos from a conference held in Dundee all of which have a Scottish theme, being 

 

1) Scotland in British Propaganda 1914-1918 by Prof Stephen Badsey 

2) The Canadian Corps 1914-1917 by Rob Thompson

3) Vera Brittain: Nursing on the Western Front by Dr Phylomena Badsey

4) Reflections on Scotland and the New Armies 1914-1918 by Prof Peter Simkins

5) Douglas Haig: Hero of Scotland, Britain and the Empire by Prof Gary Sheffield

 

The links for these are below:

 

1) 

 

 

2) 

 

 

3) 

 

 

4) 

 

 

5)  

 

 

I would warmly encourage GWF members to subscribe to the WFA youtube channel 

 

Regards

 

David

 

 

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David Tattersfield

And, hot off the press, to mark the retirement of Prof Peter Simkins as the WFA's president (he is now the WFA's co-Patron) the WFA has published, on its youtube channel, Peter's presentation to the Yorkshire branch about the 12th (Eastern) Division in the Hundred Days. I hope GWF members find this of interest. 

 

 

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The British Army and the End of the First World War - presented by Jonathan Boff

 

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Published on Jun 12, 2019

Dr Jonathan Boff gives a lecture to members and guests of the Society for Army Historical Research (SAHR). He talks about the end of World War One, the Hundred Days, and the British Army's role in the fighting in 1918 and the Allied victory.

He is speaking on Wednesday 1st May 2019, at the National Army Museum, London.

 

 

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David Tattersfield

Another video on the WFA's youtube channel has just gone live. We have 'Dominion Geordies in WW1' by James McConnel

 

 

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David Tattersfield

Another WFA video that went live a month ago and which has perhaps slipped under the radar is an excellent one by Prof Gary Sheffield.

 

In this lecture entitled 'Gallipoli and the Western Front - two sides of the same bad penny?' Prof Sheffield examines whether the experience in the Dardanelles helped to create a more effective strategy in France and Belgium 

 

He asks if the efforts of the British, ANZACs and French at Gallipoli were an 'impossible task' or was this campaign one that could have shortened the First World War?

 

This video was recorded as part of the joint Western Front Association and Gallipoli Association conference.

 

 

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David Tattersfield

A further lecture has just been posted to the WFA's youtube channel. This is Dr Rob Johnson 'Re-thinking Lawrence: Orchestrating Revolt during the Great War in the Middle East'. 

 

 

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Just to add that I thoroughly enjoy the WFA YouTube videos and have been slowly working my way through them. As a WFA member I enjoy the local branch regular meetings and the interesting guest speakers we have each month. However having access to this resource on YouTube allows me to watch other presentations that I am not able to attend in person, the Presidents Conference for example. Thanks to the WFA for providing this interesting and informative resource.

 

Regards

Peter

 

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David Tattersfield

Thanks Peter. These are a real labour of love and take a lot of man hours to produce. It's extremely gratifying to hear that it's all worthwhile. 

 

David 

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3 hours ago, David Tattersfield said:

Thanks Peter. These are a real labour of love and take a lot of man hours to produce. It's extremely gratifying to hear that it's all worthwhile. 

 

David 

 

It certainly is, worthwhile that is.

 

Ken

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Terror from the Trenches: The Great War and the Birth of Horror - W. Scott Poole

 

 
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Streamed live on Oct 30, 2019

From blood-thirsty vampires to the vengeful undead, join us as American pop and folk culture specialist W. Scott Poole traces the origins of the contemporary genre of horror to the devastation of World War I in an eye-opening conversation based upon his 2018 book, Wasteland: The Great War and the Origins of Modern Horror. Following the works of famous figures like director F.W. Murnau, actor Bela Lugosi and writers Arthur Machen and H.P. Lovecraft, Poole argues that the trauma of the Great War and its calamitous costs reappear in a multitude of macabre forms, echoing the unprecedented horrors of the trenches, haunting the screen and page through today.
Presented in partnership with the Friends of the Kansas City Public Library.

 

 

 

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David Tattersfield

A brand new video has just been uploaded to the WFA's youtube channel (if you subscribe, notifications come through of all uploads)

 

The new video is of a presentation called 'Dardanelles: centrepiece of British Strategy 1915?' . 

In this presentation, Professor Eric Grove asks if the Dardanelles was the centrepiece of British Imperial Strategy in 1915, and if this campaign was 'the greatest missed opportunity of the war'.

 

 

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David Tattersfield

Here's something that may be of interest. As an experiment, a live stream of a branch talk will be attempted on Saturday 11 January at 2.30pm (GMT). This will be available on the WFA's You Tube channel. The presentation is called "The Gallipoli Effect on the Western Front" by Clive Harris. Here's the URL for the live stream: 

 

From a practical point of view, although the presentation will commence at 2.30pm, the stream may start a few minutes before that time, so please do consider this if you tune in early and wonder what is going on. 

 

 
 
 
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David Tattersfield

The live stream of "The Gallipoli Effect on the Western Front" was defeated by a technical gremlin, but this was a useful exercise to gain an understanding. Apologies to those who tried to view this live stream yesterday. A new video has been published today to make up for the failure of the live stream. This is entitled 'Babes, Bookmakers & Beach Combers: From Gallipoli to Gavrelle with the Royal Naval Division' with Clive Harris again as the speaker. 

 

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David Tattersfield

Another attempt will be made to live stream a WFA branch presentation. After the technical gremlin of a few weeks ago, with luck this will be successful. The live stream will start a few minutes before the scheduled start time of the talk (2.30pm Saturday 1st Feb) so please keep this in mind if the live stream does not look like a presentation at first. 

The live stream will be of a talk by Luci Gosling entitled 'Goodbye, Old Man: Fortunino Matania's war'. See below for a link to the live stream. 

 

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Hi David,

 

I can't make this afternoon's meeting, after the "livestream" wil it be available to watch on-demand ?

 

Steve

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David Tattersfield

Hi Steve. The 'livestream' version may be available. This is of course experimental. Whilst there are lots of these lectures on the WFA's youtube channel, these are all edited (with images inserted and the occasional 'slip' removed).. With live streaming we are in un-chartered territory so I can't give a definite answer, other than to say that even if it's not, there will be an edited version along in due course

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