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First World War Lectures/Presentations/Discussions on YouTube

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hazelclark

Thank you for posting this.

 

Hazel C.

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The Ibis

Operation: Romanov

 

 

 

 

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Streamed live on Mar 15, 2017

Join the Museum for our latest offering in the Operation series, Operation: Romanov! At the centennial of the Russian Revolution, imbibe in a vodka infused revolutionary look at prohibition in Russia during WWI and the rise of local distilleries.

 

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WilliamRev

Professor John Bourne's WFA lecture: "Gallipoli 1915: The Faded Vision" is now available online. I was there at Wolverhampton University when it was presented in 2015. This is well worth watching - John Bourne is extraordinarily good when it comes to strategy and seeing the big picture. He is introduced by Professor Gary Sheffield.

 

William

Edited by WilliamRev

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WilliamRev

Professor Edward Spears' Western Front Association lecture, given at Wolverhampton University on Gas Warfare in the First World War is now available online.

 

William

Edited by WilliamRev

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Derek Black

Thanks for pointing these out.

 

I've found some interesting WW1 lectures through trawling youtuve recently. It's a marvellous way to learn about areas generally outside your own WW1 sphere of interest.

 

Cheers,

Derek.

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The Ibis

A Century After Vimy

This has as an all-star panel with Holger Herwig, Margaret MacMillan, Tim Cook and two others I'm not familiar with.

 

 

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Derek Black

Oh i like this.

 

I could go a few more discussion/debates like this.

 

Thanks,

Derek

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The Ibis

Here you go, then.:D

I haven't watched it yet, but the title looks controversial enough: “Won the War, Lost the Peace: The Centennial Legacy of World War One.” There are some good historians on the panel, including Mike Neiberg and Jennifer Keane:

 

 

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Derek Black

Ah, super dooper. Ta'

That Tim Cook didn't come off too well in the first one i thought.

 

Derek.

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The Ibis

World War I Centennial: History and Enduring Relevance

 

 

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Published on Apr 19, 2017

April 6, 2017, marks the hundred year anniversary of the US declaration of war on Germany. Following more than two and a half years of neutrality, the United States mobilized for war on a scale the nation had never before seen. More than two million Americans were to serve in the US armed forces during World War I. Once American combat power arrived in Europe, it tipped the military balance against Germany, frustrating Germany’s Spring Offensive of 1918 and resulting ultimately in the German surrender of November of that year.

In commemoration of the centennial of America’s entry into World War I, the Institute of World Politics and the Center for Military and Diplomatic History are hosting three of the world’s leading historians of the war: Michael S. Neiberg, Edward Lengel, and John H. Maurer.

MICHAEL S. NEIBERG is the inaugural Chair of War Studies in the Department of National Security and Strategy at the United States Army War College. His published work specializes on the First and Second World Wars, notably the American and French experiences. His most recent book on the First World War is Dance of the Furies: Europe and the Outbreak of World War I(Harvard University Press, 2011). The Wall Street Journal recently named it one of the five best books ever written about the war. In October, 2012 Basic Books published his The Blood of Free Men, a history of the liberation of Paris in 1944. In May, 2015 Basic published his Potsdam: The End of World War II and the Remaking of Europe. In October, Oxford University Press published his Path to War, a history of American responses to the Great War, 1914-1917.

EDWARD LENGEL is Chief Historian of the White House Historical Association, located in historic Decatur House on Lafayette Square in Washington, D.C. Before beginning work there in the fall of 2016, he directed the Washington Papers project for many years. A military historian, he is the author of several books, including General George Washington: A Military Life; To Conquer Hell: The Meuse-Argonne, 1918; First Entrepreneur: How George Washington Built His-and the Nation's-Prosperity; and the Army Historical Foundation award-winning Thunder and Flames: Americans in the Crucible of Combat, 1917-1918. He is also a regular contributor to magazines including Military History and Military History Quarterly, and appears often on television and radio including NPR and the History Channel.

JOHN H. MAURER is the Alfred Thayer Mahan Professor of Sea Power and Grand Strategy at the Naval War College in Newport, Rhode Island. He is a graduate of Yale University and holds an M.A.L.D. and Ph.D. in International Relations from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University. He is the author or editor of books examining the outbreak of the First World War, military interventions in the developing world, naval rivalries and arms control between the two world wars, and a study about Winston Churchill's views on British foreign policy and grand strategy. He also serves as a senior research fellow at the Foreign Policy Research Institute, on the Editorial Board of Orbis: A Journal of World Affairs, and Associate Editor of Diplomacy and Statecraft. In recognition for his service and contribution to professional military education, he has received both the U.S. Navy's Meritorious Civilian Service Award and Superior Civilian Service Award.

JOHN J. TIERNEY, JR. is the Walter Kohler Professor of International Relations at the Institute of World Politics. He was the Special Assistant and Foreign Affairs Officer, U.S. Arms Control and Disarmament Agency from 1981-1993. He has served as Executive Director of the Congressional Caucus on National Defense and the National Security Research Group, U.S. House of Representatives; Chairman, Politics Department, Catholic University; and Professor of International Relations, University of Virginia and The Johns Hopkins University.

 

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The Ibis

Prof. Sir Hew Strachan, 'The History of War and the Understanding of Contemporary Conflict'

 

This is not directly related to WWI, but there are numerous references to the historiography of the conflict throughout. Plus anything by Strachan is worth watching.

 

 

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The Ibis

Douhet and Command of the Air

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Streamed live on Sep 7, 2017

After World War I, some military theorists saw airpower as a way to avoid the horror of the trenches. Dr. Gates Brown discusses the promises of airpower theorists like Giulio Douhet, who argued that air forces could end wars before traditional military forces were ready to begin fighting. The work of these theorists helped develop the U.S. Army Air Corps’ strategic bombing doctrine during the interwar period.

 

 

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The Ibis

As a baseball fan, this one is near and dear to me.

 

From the Dugouts to the Trenches: Baseball during the Great War

 

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Streamed live on Sep 21, 2017
In partnership with the Negro Leagues Baseball Museum, Jim Leeke, author of the newly released From the Dugouts to the Trenches: Baseball during the Great War, will discuss how World War I affected America’s pastime and changed the sport forever.

 

Fast forward to the 11:40 mark to skip the intros.

 

 

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The Ibis

“Mr. Sargent Goes to War” Presented by Richard Ormond, CBE

 

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Published on Oct 19, 2017

John Singer Sargent’s engagement as an official war artist during the First World War is an involved and protracted story. It led to the creation of his masterpiece Gassed, a highlight of the Frist Center’s exhibition World War I and American Art, and to a sequence of remarkable watercolors painted near the front line. It was followed by General Officers of World War I, a group portrait of British and Commonwealth commanders. In this lecture, Richard Ormond places these works in the context of Sargent’s career by analyzing the artist’s response to the horrors of war, tracing the sources of his inspiration, and charting the stages of his artistic process.

Richard Ormond, Commander of the British Empire, is a former deputy director of London’s National Portrait Gallery and former director of the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England. A great-nephew of John Singer Sargent, Ormond is currently director of the Sargent catalogue raisonné project, as well as co-author of the nine-volume Sargent survey published by Yale University Press. Ormond has curated many Sargent exhibitions, including the Met’s Sargent: Portraits of Artists and Friends (2015). His books on nineteenth-century British art include studies of Edwin Landseer, Frederic Leighton, George Frederic Watts, and Franz Xaver Winterhalter, among others.

This lecture is supported in part by the Department of History of Art at Vanderbilt University.

 

 

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Fattyowls

More great stuff here. Many thanks.

 

Pete.

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The Ibis
'French Canada’s impact in the First World War' a lecture by Desmond Morton
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Published on Sep 19, 2017

The McGill Institute for the Study of Canada held a special event in honour of Dr. Desmond Morton, Hiram Mills Emeritus Professor and Founding Director of the Institute (1994-2001). Accompanied by several distinguished speakers, Professor Morton presented a lecture entitled "French Canada’s Impact in the First World War". The September 14th event simultaneously celebrated Professor Morton's invaluable contributions to Canadian Studies, as well as his 80th birthday.

 

 

 

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The Ibis

Two for today.

The Battle of Beersheba - myths and history,100 years on

 

 
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Published on Oct 31, 2017

Fought on 31 October 1917, the Battle of Beersheba, and its dramatic conclusion by a mounted charge of two Australian light horse regiments, has become one of Australia’s best known First World War actions. It is perhaps the only battle fought in the Sinai-Palestine Campaign of 1916-18 that many Australians might recognise, has been the subject of Australian feature films (twice) and today its memory has become a vehicle for the promotion of Australian-Israeli ties. It has also become a tool for national self-congratulation and myth-making, with claims about the Australian role including that it was the last great cavalry charge in history or that that it turned the tide of campaign.This public lecture will examine the battle and the Australian role in it to challenge some myths and offer an insightful appreciation of the events and their place in history.

Jean Bou is a military historian and a senior lecturer at the ANU Strategic and Defence Studies Centre. He is the author, co-author or editor of ten books on Australian military history and has written extensively on the Australian involvement in the First World War, particularly on the fighting in Palestine.

 

 

 

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The Ibis

This one is really excellent: 1917 and the French Mutinies  

 

Fast forward to the 8 minute mark.

 

 
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Streamed live on Nov 14, 2017

One hundred years after French mutineers shouted, “down with the war!” the legacy of the 1917 mutinies remains. Join Dr. André Loez in an eye-opening lecture as he addresses how the mutinies inform and reframe our understanding of World War I. Don’t miss the opportunity to consider what makes an army put down its weapons, or continue to fight. This program is proudly presented in partnership with Park University, the Cultural Services of the French Embassy with support from the French Mission du centenaire de la Première Guerre mondiale.

 

 

 

 

 

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Ronan McGreevy

You might be interested in  my YouTube channel. Regards, Ronan 

 

 

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The Ibis

‘The crucible of war: the adaption and development of the British Army on the Western Front 1915’  - Dr. Spencer Jones

 

 

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The Ibis

Happy new year everyone. Here is an interesting one - 1914 Rabaul Campaign

 

 
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Published on Dec 5, 2017

Analysis by an expert panel of the 1914 Australian capture of Rabaul in German New Guinea. Convenor Professor Tom Frame with panel is Rear Admiral Peter Briggs, Professor Michael Epkenhans, Dr David Stevens, Dr Stephenson & Commander Greg Swinden.
Produced by the Naval Studies Group in conjunction with the Submarine Institute of Australia, the Australian Naval Institute, Naval Historical Society and the RAN Seapower Centre.

 

 

 

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The Ibis

Kde domov muj and Wacht am Rhein: Singing Loyalty and Disloyalty in Habsburg Bohemia during the First World War

 

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Dr Tamara Scheer (Ludwig Boltzmann-Institute for Historical Social Science/Institute for East European History, University of Vienna) gives a talk for the Globalising and Localising the Great War seminar series.

 

http://podcasts.ox.ac.uk/kde-domov-muj-and-wacht-am-rhein-singing-loyalty-and-disloyalty-habsburg-bohemia-during

Edited by The Ibis

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The Ibis

The Indian Army in World War One with Dr. Charles Godfrey

 

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Published on Jan 13, 2018

The RCMI's own HLCol/Dr Charles Godfrey discusses the history of the Army of India and its role in the British Imperial Army's campaigns on the Western Front, the Dardanelles and the Middle East in World War One.

 

 

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hazelclark

Thanks for that. Will watch it.

H.C.

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Fattyowls

Another really interesting one, thank you. This is a unique thread and full of fantastic finds. What I need to do is set aside some time each week to start looking at some more.

 

Pete.

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