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Remembered Today:

Which battalion was my Great Great Great Uncle in?


CambraiComrade
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Hello all,

I have asked many questions on the matter but my GGG Uncle was in the West Yorks 1st batt attached to the 2/6th batt. So which was he in. He was a territorial officer.

Many thanks,

William E.J Rowland

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If he was attached then he was attached from the 1st Battalion and to the 2/6th.

The 2/6th Bn of the Blankshire Regiment was a 2nd line Reserve/Training Unit so it's possible he was attached to that Battalion from the Regular Battalion as many regular officers were especially when the 2nd line formations were created. Many 2nd Line units went on active service overseas later in the war.

However if you really want our help it's probably simpler if you post what is known as your question makes little sense without those details.

Ken

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He went to France in 1917 and was killed on the 22/11/1917. This was after visiting several camps since 1915 in England but that is all I know.

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His name might help?

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More clues here: 1st battalion or 2/6th Battalion insignia? :thumbsup:

Hello All,

My Great Great Great Uncle Captain Walter Moorhouse was in the West Yorkshire Regiment. According to records he was 1st Batt attached to 2/6th batt.

My question is what insignia would have worn then? Insignia for the 1st or 2/6th Batt?

Many thanks,

William

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Awfully sorry everyone, not being very helpful here. Captain Walter Moorhouse of B Company 2/6th batt the West Yorks

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Walter Moorhouse was originally in the 15th (Service) Battalion West Yorkshire Regiment (1st Leeds) a locally raised or 'Pals' Battalion, raised by the Mayor of Leeds. His regimental number was 15/654, i.e. 15th Bn. and probably the 654th soldier to enlist. A locally raised Battalion was funded by the authority that raised it until it was up to strength and handed over to the War Office, therefore he was almost certainly in the original contingent of volunteers. The raising of these Battalions was well publicised locally so the local newspaper could be your next call.

He went to Egypt in December 1915 with the main body of the Battalion, his rank was L(?ance)/Sgt so he probably held a supervisory position prior to enlistment.

He was not a 'Territorial Officer', but a 'temporary gentleman' promoted from the ranks although he was attached to a Territorial Battalion.

He remained in the same Regiment and was probably posted on promotion to the 1st Bn. His promotion (at least I assume it's him) was in the LG 17 April 1917 to date from 28 March

https://www.thegazette.co.uk/London/issue/30038/supplement/4040

There may be other references I haven't looked.

At some point he was attached to the 2/6th Bn in France and held the rank of A/Capt when killed at Cambrai according to his mic. (SDGW shows 2/Lieut; CWGC Captain) As Captain he was probably in command of 'B' Company you'll need to check the war diary. Downloadable from TNA http://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/C7355389

Ken

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So he joined as other ranks and worked his way from there?

Many thanks for the information,

William

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So he joined as other ranks and worked his way from there?

Many thanks for the information,

William

Yes that's correct not so much 'worked his way' as recommended and selected for a commission for his skill and leadership.

There is a lot of information on the web including a dedicated website for the 'Leeds Pals' http://leeds-pals.com and a published history of the Battalion.

Your man is probably in this photograph of the Sergeants Mess taken in February 1916 http://www.leodis.net/display.aspx?resourceIdentifier=20081028_167725&DISPLAY=FULL

Ken

EDIT apparently not as someone has added the names! Though there is another photo in the series with the same subject.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Evening William.

Bit more time on my hands this evening.

I have checked some notes myself and Dave Stowe W.F.A. compiled a number of years back as regards the 15th (Service) Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment:

Lance-Sergeant Walter Moorhouse 15/654

"C" Company, Company Commander, George Clifford Whitaker

Number 9 Platoon, Platoon Commander, Second-Lieutenant Eric St. Aubyn Brooksbank.

Section Number 4 and I presume that Walter is the Section Commander.

Hope you find the above of some interest.

Chris.

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Many thanks old boy, this is of great help!

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Evening William.

I will send you a PM over the course of the next few days as to men of Section Number 4. This will provide you with some details of 11 the men who served along with Walter.

All the best.

Chris.

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Searching some of my archives, I have found one photograph of Walter, taken whilst serving with the 15th (Service) Battalion, West Yorkshire Regiment on board H.M.T. Ascania.

This image taken whilst the Battalion were bound for Marseille.

Left to right Sergeants Dunwell, Cox, Pape and Odgers.

Seated, Chapman and Moorhouse.

I have re-sized the original so hopefully the latter will upload ok.

Best wishes.

Chris.

post-47-0-13528200-1419193707_thumb.jpg

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Thanks Chris!

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William,

Think it may be well worth getting copies of the battalion diary .

There is a narrative of the actions 20-22 Nov which includes a paragraph on Moorhouse leading his company forward on the 20th and I can say it was not B company!!

There are also many maps/plans of objectives, company objectives with map refs.

On the 23rd the CO wrote another appendix for the actions 20-22 Nov which gives the map refs for the trenches occupied by Moorhouse through the night of 21-22.

It seems the CO received reports late on 21st that the Hindenburg Line had been taken and was occupied but when he went out there himself early the next morning he found the companies in narrow shallow trenches which he knew was not the Hindenburg Line. Moorhouse's company and 2 others then fought off the enemy 3 times.

TEW

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Will indeed purchase them. Three times? Wow I had no idea.

Many thanks,

William

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