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Roger Casement: How did a hero come to be considered a traitor?

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brianmorris547

The Bolton Evening News 14/04/1916 reported the arrest of Sir Roger Casement.

"A Copenhagen telegram says it is reported there that Sir Roger Casement has been arrested somewhere in Germany on a charge not specified".

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wig

In early April 1916 Casement was still a guest of the Kaiser in Berlin and had certainly not been arrested. He did not arrive in Ireland (landing from a German submarine) until April 21st.

Bolton News not very accurate!

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David Filsell

Nor are the Wanderers when shooting on goal!

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archangel9

The Bolton Evening News 14/04/1916 reported the arrest of Sir Roger Casement.

"A Copenhagen telegram says it is reported there that Sir Roger Casement has been arrested somewhere in Germany on a charge not specified".

It would appear that Casement was at sea at the time -

"Memorandum by Richard Meyer

Berlin, April 12th, 1916

Sir Roger Casement and two Irish corporals Monteith and Beverley have embarked on a submarine yesterday the 11th in Wilhelmshaven for the West Coast of Ireland."

From Prelude to the Easter Rising by Reinhard R. Doerries.

John

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Martin Bennitt

There's an article on Casement in this month's History Today by Andrew Lycett, who concludes that Casement "is now widely acknowledged to stand among Ireland's greats". Apart from his somewhat peripheral role in the Easter Rising, he refers to Casement as "a model humanitarian, who as a result of his experiences in Africa and South America, raised issues that are as relevant now as in the early 20th century, issues of corporate responsibility, environmental justice and human rights."

Cheers Martin B

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brianmorris547

I posted the 14/04/1916 report about the arrest of Sir Roger Casement because I had never noticed it before and wondered if anyone could expand. I was aware of his voyage. I read the accounts of the Rising and the trial of Sir Roger Casement the last time I went through the 1916 Bolton papers, both are covered in some detail. I am currently going through the Bolton papers again on a weekly basis 100 years on so I will keep my eyes open for anything of interest.

Brian

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brianmorris547

The Bolton Evening News 22/04/1916 reported a mysterious discovery on Irish coast. A collapsible boat, containing arms and ammunition, was seized at Carrahane Strand, Tralee Bay. The following day it quoted the Secretary for the Admiralty "During the period -pm April 20th and - pm April 21st an attempt to land arms and ammunition was made by a vessel under the guise of a neutral merchant ship but in reality a German auxiliary, in conjunction with a German submarine. The auxiliary sank and a number of prisoners were made amongst whom was Sir Roger Casement". There followed a biography which included, "only a few days ago it was reported that he had been arrested in Germany, the charge was not stated. It is possible that the rumour was a mere blind on the part of the German authorities".

Brian

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corisande

I include for you a link to my work on Casement in Germany, which follows almost daily his time there and his attempts to create an Irish Brigade

http://www.irishbrigade.eu/other-men/casement/casement.html

The overall Irish Brigade story runs from the front page of the site http://www.irishbrigade.eu/

My main work was on the Irish Brigade, not on Casement after he left Germany in the submarine

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brianmorris547

Thank you for sharing that, very interesting. It is not my intention to post on here the Bolton Evening News reports covering his trial, I was trying to find out more about this report of his arrest in Germany which did not fit in with his known movements. Just for interest the paper referred to some of the inducements offered to Irish POWs i.e. a German farm, a German wife and three marks a day for life. It also reported that Sir Roger Casement was physically attacked by some POWs.

Brian

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archangel9

At Limburg the Germans grouped together men from Irish regiments. The fact that a lot of these men were not even Irish seems to have escaped them. Also the mood amongst the Irish contingent was misjudged and very few actually joined the Irish Brigade. In April 1915 Casement wrote to Count Wedel -

"......I have just got a letter from Father Nicholson (5 April) in which, speaking of the removal of the three young Corporals from the Camp, he says; - 'The British flunkeys in the camp are furious and endeavouring more than ever to terrorise those over whom they can exercise any control.' "

He includes a list of "men who are either not Irish at all, or are so strongly Pro-British that they seriously hinder the effort to form an Irish Brigade" He suggests the men on his list should be removed from Limburg.

Source: Prelude to the Easter Rising by Reinhard R. Doerries

John

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