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Krithia

Lieutenant Waldren of "Walden's Point"

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michaeldr

in 2013 on the Peninsula, we have a brand new "Hidden Gallipoli" walking tour to get all those able two-legged folk to the places that few have ever trodden. Tempted?

Very much so!

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michaeldr

in 2013 on the Peninsula, we have a brand new "Hidden Gallipoli" walking tour to get all those able two-legged folk to the places that few have ever trod. Tempted?

Tempted, and succumbed!

Great itinerary ( "]http://www.battle-ho...ours/tour13-7/ )

E-mail already sent to Clive and dates marked off in the new diary

Happy New Year

Michael

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Auimfo

Hi Everyone,

Sorry I hadn't seen this thread until now.

I can confirm that my Grandfather spent most of the period between Aug - Dec 1915 at Walden Point (or Waldon Grove as he called it in his diaries). The 4th Field Amb took up position at Walden Point in early August but when they were given a break in Lemnos during Sept, they handed the ambulance camp over to the 7th Field Amb. The 4th returned at the beginning of November and took the camp back from the 7th. Interestingly it was only when they arrived back from Lemnos that my Grandfather began to use the name Waldon Grove. Prior to that (in August while he was there) the place doesn't appear to have had a name.

Unfortunately he didn't mention how it came by it's name.

If the exact location of Walden Point is helpful to establishing how it got it's name I can pinpoint it for you. These days it is more commonly known as 7th Field Ambulance Cemetery. Here is a comparison of my my Grandfather photo of Walden Point and my photo in 2007 of 7th Field Amb Cemetery.

Cheers,

Tim L.

post-2918-0-97268300-1357211120_thumb.jp

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Guest

Gents....from the History of the 2nd County of London (Westminster Dragoon) Yeomanry, it appears that Major Lord Howard de Walden (mentioned in one of my earlier posts) was DAQMG 29th Div and was in the area of Suvla Bay. I suspect the 29th Div's logistics base never got near Walden Point.

MG

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Guest

If the exact location of Walden Point is helpful to establishing how it got it's name I can pinpoint it for you. These days it is more commonly known as 7th Field Ambulance Cemetery. Here is a comparison of my my Grandfather photo of Walden Point and my photo in 2007 of 7th Field Amb Cemetery. Cheers, Tim L.

post-2918-0-97268300-1357211120_thumb.jp

Tim - a great "then and now" photo. Thanks for sharing this. MG

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Auimfo

Thanks Martin.

I've done a little more digging but haven't yet discovered when or why it was named Walden's Point. My Grandfather was pretty studious in recording the place names of where they were located at any given time and it strikes me as odd that he never mentioned it prior to his return there after a rest at Lemnos. This would usually indicate to me that the place didn't have a name until then or at least quite some time after they originally arrived there in early August.

I have confirmed that the name existed before the 7th Field Ambulance took over from the 4th FAmb on 13-14 September because they mention taking over the position by name. So that establishes a date that we know it was named prior to but I can find no record of it's name being used before that. The NZ Canterbury Mounted Rifles were given the task of capturing it in early August so perhaps there is mention of it in their orders/war diary but someone will have to look that up.

I tend to agree that it was probably named after a NZ scout (most likely Colin Warden) but in the absence of concrete proof, this chap cannot be overlooked:

669 Private Joseph Benjamin Harold Walden

18th Battalion AIF

who was KIA on 22nd August 1915 in the vicinity of Hill 60.

- although admittedly there is nothing specific about him from all the other 18th Bn men killed that day that might suggest a place be named after him.

Cheers,

Tim L.

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gilly100

Hi Tim

Great photos and thanks. I will be there next year with luck!!

I seem to remember a member of the clergy went by that name or similar, but will need to dig up where I saw it, like administering support to the wounded etc.

So tied up with other stuff at present and desperate to return to Hill 60, which is closer to this thread for sure!!

Cheers

Ian

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gilly100

Thanks to Michael for this possible!

Captain and Chaplain (Church of Christ) Georg Trilford Walden born 23/10/1861. Got a degree at a University in Kentucky USA at some stage prior to war. Embarked in Australia on 25 June 1915.

Attached to 18th Bn AIF, 5th Brigade and embarked for Gallipoli on 16 August 1915. 18Bn decimated at Hill 60 on 22 August 1915.

Walden became ill and was sent via 5th Field Ambulance to No2 Casualty Station on 6 September, before transfer to 16th CCS with enteritis the following day. Sent away on 8 September 1915. Later served on Western Front.

Perhaps not long enough on peninsula to have a place named after him. Will dig some more.

Cheers

Ian

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Guest

Steve,

Just to throw a spanner in the works. In New Zealanders at Gallipoli by Fred Waite on p.324 Waite describes Walden's Point as " North of Taylor's Hollow. Waldren, who's name was always mis-spelt - Walden was a very daring sniper who did much reconnoitering on the Suvla Flats as a machine gun officer of the Moaris. He was killed at the Apex".

It is worth emphasising that this description is from a section of Waite's book called "the Place Names of ANZAC" which runs as an alphabetical gazetteer of place names, trenches etc. with quite detailed descriptions of the positions and the history behind the names. There are nearly 150 specific points named.

Waite was Adjutant to the Divisional Engineers NZ & A Division 1914-1915 and the introduction states that the authors of the NZ histories all fought with the NZEF. If he did indeed serve at Gallipoli he would have had detailrd personal knowledge of this area. The NZ sappers were likely instrumental in mapping the area (I have seen very detailed Australian Sapper maps of Quinn's Post for example) which might also reinforce the integrity of Waite's claim for the provenance of the name of Waldren's Point.

MG

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gilly100

Hi Martin

Sounds probably right on your man Waldren, which has been discussed earlier on the thread. I will flick thru some 5th Brigade AIF stuff and see if Walden the chaplain pops up or not. His short tenure at Gallipoli would be against him for place naming.

Cheers

Ian

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Krithia

A gret little thread, and we have not even debated "Walden's Knob" yet.

I also believe it was named after Private Colin Warden (note the misspelling) who is commemorated on panel 11 on the Chunuk Bair Memorial, named afte rhim for he scouting he did in this area prior to the August breakout. Warden was an accomplished scout, sniper and machine gunner who was killed at The Apex on 8 August, whilst commanding a Maori Contingent machine gun. Captain Jessie Wallingford wrote: had he lived, was a marvel, and would have made an excellent brigade machine gun officer. Killed alongside Warden was Private Donald Ferris (Sp.Mem.B.16), who is buried in Embarkation Cemetery.

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Guest

Hi Martin

Sounds probably right on your man Waldren, which has been discussed earlier on the thread. I will flick thru some 5th Brigade AIF stuff and see if Walden the chaplain pops up or not. His short tenure at Gallipoli would be against him for place naming.

Cheers

Ian

I can't claim credit (and wouldn't want to) ...just echoing/emphasising another's view........and my 2nd Edition of Waite arrived last week so rather luckily I was already in the area so to speak. By the way I finally got to read your book. Excellent.

MG

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Guest

A gret little thread, and we have not even debated "Walden's Knob" yet.

I also believe it was named after Private Colin Warden (note the misspelling) who is commemorated on panel 11 on the Chunuk Bair Memorial, named afte rhim for he scouting he did in this area prior to the August breakout. Warden was an accomplished scout, sniper and machine gunner who was killed at The Apex on 8 August, whilst commanding a Maori Contingent machine gun. Captain Jessie Wallingford wrote: had he lived, was a marvel, and would have made an excellent brigade machine gun officer. Killed alongside Warden was Private Donald Ferris (Sp.Mem.B.16), who is buried in Embarkation Cemetery.

A rather small additional point....in the book. "The Auckland Regiment NZEF 1914-1918" by Burton he records him as 'Richard Walden' [page 61] when commenting on his death (an obvious error).

What I find strange is that while the author mentions his exploits (as does Waite in his history of the NZEF at Gallipoli) Walden/Waldren does not even get a MID and rather curiously is not listed in the copious appendix as KIA at Gallipoli. It seems strange that a man who was so prominent in the psyche of the authors didn't quite manage to get his exploits recognised at the time in an Official context. Really . How does a man who gets mentioned by name in not one, but two histories, get forgotten in the Roll of Honour? It raises questions. How does the best Scout in the NZEF whose recorded heroic exploits completely miss offcial recognition?

The 10th (Irish) Div claim they were short-changed in the awards and honours at Gallipoli due to friction between Generals. I am not aware that the NZEF had the same claim, which raises the question why, if a man was so prominent in the minds of the later historians, why did he not get official recognition as a member of what was (relatively) a very small force. ..... It does not sit well in my mind.

This has nothing to do with the provenance of the name of Walden Point (I think it is him) but the features named after people such as Jephson, Walker, Russell, Plugge, Quinn, Tint (actually Tynte) Boulton, Bridges, Coventry, Chatham, Clarke, Courtney, Dawkin, Durrant, Gillespie, Johnston, Leane, Malone, Monash, McLagan, , McLaurin, Mc Cay, Owen, Phillip, Pope, Steel, Taylor, etc ad nauseam all seem to be officially recognised in some way. .... It would be an interesting exercise to see ho many men who had geographic features named after them who were not recognised in the despatches.... Having a feature at Gallipoli named after an individual might suggest that the troops on the ground (at least in some cases) recognised who deserved recognition.

I am reading Waite at the moment and it is making my blood boil. The bias is truly staggering. Really. He even suggests if it was left to the ANZACS alone (had there been enough) it would have been won. A statement that is easy to make and significantly harder (impossible actually) to prove. He also manages to twist history by explaining how the NZEF actually won Gallipoli by dint if the fact that they occupied the peninsula after the armistice. Any author who can stretch facts tha far needs to be treated with great caution in my view. "Don't let facts get in the way of a good story" .... How Waldren/Walden could be leading the British to Chocolate Hill one minute and then on the Apex the next raises questions. I would go as far as to say it was impossible.

Waite is nearly as dismissive as Bean on the Kitchener men at Suvla. They both confuse poor General leadership with tactical leadership. The battalion Officers in the Kitchener assault divisions saw at Divisional level (I think) the one of the highest concentration of casualties (and that includes the Somme) in the whole War, yet history has been unkind to these men. I digress, but I have yet to see evidence of an ANZAC battalion at Gallipoli with casualty rates higher than the battalions of the 10th and 11th Divisions (New Army) suffered in their first two weeks from landing. The ANZACS had the great fortune to have incredibly detailed preserved records. Sadly for the 98% Officer casualties in the assaulting Kitchener Battalions there were few detailed dedicated battalion histories to record their exploits, for the simple fact that there were so few survivors. Ironically some of the most detailed British histories come from units that suffered the least (on a relative basis) - the egotistical Jourdain and his desperate keenness to promote the exploits if the 5th Connaughts springs to mind. People like GWF member Steve Morse and his history of the 9th (Service) Bn Sherwood Foresters has partly redressed the imbalance, particularly so given the War Diary was lost. An incredible achievement in rebuilding a lost history. . Sadly, nearly 100 years after the event units such as the 8th (Service) Bn Northumberland Fusiliers who had only one Officer left after 14 days have no written history. I say this as I stare at the histories of every infantry battalion and every Mounted Rifle unit of the NZEF on my bookshelf. They were well served by their historians. The Immense void in the British battalion histories relating to Gallipoli stands in stark contrast to the truly immense efforts of ANZAC historians. I fear that the shameful paucity of the former wrongly implies that these battalions did nothing. It is a curious thing that we are debating the actions of a single New Zealand soldier at Gallipoli and are able to follow versions through published histories. It is unlikely that this would happen with a British soldier, simply because for the British Gallipoli was a shameful failure that ultimately (statistically) was minute compare to the grinding slaughter on the Western Front. Bean and Waite are beyond doubt quite biased in my opinion. Had they seen the 4th Worcestershire annihilated at Worcester Flat on the same type of diversionary folly as the men at the Nek, they might have stopped and thought a while. The national biases are a thematic of great interest to me (the Brits were not immune) and I can only conclude from the evidence provided in the NZ histories that the authors had a very narrow view of events. I would treat any comments in the NZ Histories on Walden/Waldren with great caution simply because of the obvious errors (name, location, unit for example) and the fact he was not recognised in the Despatches. Just how did that happen?

My instincts tell me that one of the authors (Waite or Burton) leaned on the other. Not sure which as Waite published in 1919 and my edition of Burton has no date. I am very sensitive to the possibility of the subtle contagion of false information between the early authors of WWI. This is an area most (modern) authors underestimate in my opinion. This thread is a very good example of just how difficult it is to be absolutely sure...... so at the very least there are a few minor errors in the books which we (and I include myself) heavily rely on to establish one version of the truth. ..... For the record I do think Walden's Point is named after this NZ Scout.

Any mistakes are entirely mine.

MG

P.S. heavily edited

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Bryn

I'm certain that Colin Airlie Warden is the man. The following is from an interview in London with Captain Wallingford NZEF:

A GALLANT SCOUT.

One of the finest of all the fine men who passed through the dangerous apprenticeship of the machine-guns was the scout Warden. A native of New South Wales, Warden was in Fiji when the war broke out, and although on the reserve of officers of Australia he went to Samoa, as a private in the New Zealand contingent, and afterwards joined the main body in New Zealand, A splendid figure physically, he did not know what fear was, and he proved to be the finest scout imaginable. He it was who was told to guide the British battalions to their position on our left on the morning of the great landing at Suvla Bay, and in spite of anything said to the contrary he did guide them there, and pointed out their ground before he rejoined Captain Wallingford's section. That was a desperate day for the machine-guns. No sooner had the Wellingtons, under their fearless Colonel Malone, crowned the ridge, where they could plainly be seen against the skyline in the breaking dawn, than the four best gun teams were rushed forward to their assistance. Only two got there, and they were not complete, so the two guns were put together and worked as one. What happened to the others no one knew. Later in the day they were reinforced. It was a deadly corner, enfiladed and battered from all sides, and one after another the guns were knocked out and the crews killed or injured. The bravest of all were the Maori team, all of whom were laid out.

A HERO'S DEATH.

It was in that day's fighting that Warden met his death, and for some time it was impossible to recover the body or to bury it. Finally, on a half starlight night, the gallant Father Dore, whose name is in every mouth, with Captain Wallingford and some volunteers from the gun team nearest, crept out and furtively dug a grave, and with the simplest service the finest of scouts was laid to rest. Seven guns in all were sent to the top of Chunuk Bair, where the Wellingtons had more than held their own against odds. After 36 hours in the new trenches they were relieved and a British battalion, the Loyal North Lancs., it is believed, took their place. Seven New Zealand machine guns remained with them in garrison. During the day following it became known that the whole post had been wiped out. It simply disappeared mysteriously, something like 40 of the Lancashires getting back to the main body.

(Poverty Bay Herald 20 Nov 1915 p9).

warden_smh_2sep1915p5.jpg

PRIVATE C. A. WARDEN

Private Colin Alrlie Warden (killed in action) was 25 years of age, and the second son of the late Mr. A. A. Warden and of Mrs. Warden, of Lindsay-street, Neutral Bay. He was an engineer by profession, and was for some years in the employ of the C.S.R. Co.

He afterwards went to Fiji to follow his profession, and on ths outbreak of war volunteered from there, and went to Samoa. He was one of the ten men who hauled down the Imperial German Standard from the Government House at Apia. Private Warden was a native of Largs, in the Maitland district, and was educated at the Maitland High School. (Sydney Morning Herald 3 Sep 1915 p10).

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Auimfo

Thanks for that Bryn.

I think with all the accounts produced thus far, Colin Airlie WARDEN is certainly the man they refer to and highly likely to be the source for the name Walden Point. But is there any evidence anywhere that confirms Walden Point was named after him? The fact that a number of WARDEN's contemporaries incorrectly thought his name included an 'L' may explain the mis-spelling of the place name, but it's still not confirmation that's from where it was derived.

Of course, no evidence might exist to solve this question definitively and if that's the case, given what 'is' known, I think most people would be prepared to accept it was from WARDEN.

Cheers,

Tim L.

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Bryn

Right Tim, as long as we keep in mind that 'most people being prepared to accept something' is still not definitive proof. If one of the British battalions that Warden guided mentions him as having been the source of the name, for example in a diary or unit history, that would clinch it for sure.

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Auimfo

Bryn,

Something in writing would most certainly resolve any remaining debate. In the meantime, although we might not be able to class it as 'beyond reasonable doubt', I think it would be fair to assess it as 'on the balance of probabilities'.

Cheers,

Tim L.

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JenniferCWPearson

Hi all I'm a desendant of Colin Airlie Warden. Here is some information that I know and letters from Capt Jesse Wallingford to Col's mother and Col's brother, Aubrey Airlie Warden "Airlie", 2nd Light Horse, Gallipoli. Colin was born near Maitland in the Hunter Valley, he had been an Officer of the Royal Engineers before the War. Col and Airlie were in Fiji as Plantation Managers when the WW1 broke out. Airlie left and joined up in Townsville QLD with the 2nd LH. Col and several other men joined the NZ German Samoa Expedition Force when the ships called into Suva. Col and the other Fijian contingent were the boarding party to go ashore and take control of the Communications Centre. They landed without a hitch and advanced up to the Communication Centre. They entered the Centre and captured the flag and Samoa surrendered without a shot being fired. Reason being no one was manning the Centre at the time. Upon returning to Auckland NZ lots of photos were taken and celebrations etc. The flag is in the Auckland War Museum. The Fijian Contingent were disbanded and Col re-enlisted in the NZ Expeditionary Force, Auckland Regiment.

25 April 1915 - Col is on the beach at Gallipoli. Mayhem is rife and Capt Wallingford comes across Private Col Warden collecting dog tags of the dead and Col hands then to Wallingford. So families can be notified. This meeting was the beginning of a remarkable trusted friendship. Col was a good shot and so Wallingford made him his right hand man. During their time together Col would go night or day, into enemy trenches, get intelligence, return and make a map of the trench lines and report any intelligence to Wallingford. On many occasion Col had saved Wallingford life. Col was personally requested to escort a group of British officers to a location and when his job was completed early he requested to return to Capt Wallingford, which was granted. On heading up to Chunck Bair, he ask a General, who thought very highly of Col, if he could get some guns, and some troops to take up. The General gave him 6 Maxim Guns and the Maoris. Col, who had been a Lieut in the Royal Engineers took control and many believed he was an Officer already. Comments were made that Lieut Warden had the Maoris. Note that Col was going to be promoted to an Officer in 4 days but he was killed. Col headed up to Chunck Bair and was warmly greeted by Wallingford. Who was glad to have his great scout beside him. When the fighting started Col was on one side of Wallingford and the Maoris on the other. During the hot fire fight Col was shot through the heart by a sniper. Wallingford was hit by flying shrapnel from his gun and was knock out for a short time and when he came to he saw Col had died and the Maoris has been killed too. He buried Col and he returned that night with the Padre. He dug a grave and Col was placed in it with a rock at his head and one at his feet for a land mark. They prayed for Col as the bullets fly over head. Wallingford said it was a fitting burial for a soldier. Wallingford then continued no stop fighting for three days and he fought like a mad man.

So that's a brief story of Col. For Col to be known as the Great NZ Scout or Wallingford's Scout and to be personally requested to do escort duties, who could draw a map of the enemy trench from the inside, be a sniper, collect intelligence, handle a maxium gun, and have the faith and trust of the troops all the way up to Generals, he must be one hell of a soldier. So it would be without a doubt that it's Wardens Point in honor of Colin Airlie Warden.

Hope this helps. Jenny

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stevebecker

Jenny,

Can you confirm these details on Aubrey;

WARDEN Aubrey Airlie 396 L/Cpl 02 LHR B Sqn C or D Troop? WIA 29/30-6-15 shoulder in bayonet charge at Popes post (G) disch 7-3-16

(Fiji Rewa MR 5 years) (Boer War?) brother Colin NZEF KIA

I am intested in his pre war service like was he in the Boer War and his service in the Milita?

Cheers

S.B

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JenniferCWPearson

Hi S.B.

Years ago I tried to find out about the Boer War and if the Warden boys had been in it. I couldn't find anything as the Internet was only young at the time. I'm looking at it now and various other military things that are written in Col Warden's letters to his mother Amy Warden. One question I'd like to ask is, why are you interested in Colin Warden?

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JenniferCWPearson

Steve B. Sorry I will recheck Airlie's (Aubrey Airlie) military records and letters to see the what division he was in in the 2ndLH.

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stevebecker

Jenny,

No reason in general.

I am looking at soldiers in the 2nd LHR and his name is shown.

He records two years in South Africa, and I had thought it was Boer war related but maybe after in Natal during the rebellion of 1906?

The reason for what Troop he was in when wounded was a reported in the 2nd LHR histroy, which records that C and D Troops B Sqn 2 LHR under Lt's Burge and Chisholm counter attacked a Turkish attack with a bayonet charge lossing two killed and 2 wounded, L/Cpl Warden carried one of the later back. But I am still not sure what Troop he was in?

Cheers

S.B

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JenniferCWPearson

Hi S.B. Sorry, I dont get on the computer much. I never even thought that Airlie (Aubrey Airlie Warden) would be in anything else but the Boer War. Ive never been able to find him in any Boer records. So you may have hint the nail on the head that it maybe Natal in 1906. For your information, all the WW1 Australian military and nurses are on the Australian Archives website in digital form. Ive gone through Airlie's records as Ive got the hard copy and please note his digital copy is out of order. So this is what Ive found out:

Aubrey Airlie Warden No 396, 2nd Light Horse Regiment, enlisted in Rockhampton QLD 21 Aug 1914 as a Private. 18 Sep 1914 Promoted to Lance Corporal, (written L/CPL). His records dont show any acting rank or promotion to SGT. He embarkeded at Brisbane per A15 "Star of England" on 24 Sep 1914. Injuries he sustained - 3 Jan 1915 - 26 Jan 1915, Military Hospital Alexandria, fractured left ribs. 2 Mar 1915 - 9 Mar 1915, Detention & Isolation Hospital, Abbassia, Measles (never had any more children when he returned from the war and he had another two wives after my GG mother). 8 Jul 1915 - 13 Aug 1915, No 2 Hospital, Gherzireh, Cairo then to Mena House, Cairo, Gun Shot Wound to the collar bone exiting through the shoulder blade during a bayonet charge at Popes Hill. He was discharged 13 Aug 1915 to return to Australia. He was in the 2LH Regiment B Company or B Squadron depending on who wrote up his medical records.

Now during some research at the AWM I found this interesting bit of information. You may know this already. Its from the "History of the 2nd Light Horse Regiment AIF 1914-1919, pg 15 "The meaning - The 1st, 2nd, 3rd ALH Regiment formed the the 1st ALH BRIGADE that left with the first contingent.

The 4th ALH Regiment left with the first contingent from Victoria, but were attached to the Infantry and not included in any Mounted Brigade.

The 5th, 6th & 7th ALH Regiments formed the 2ALH BRIGADE, & were with the 2nd contingent. The 8th, 9th & 10th Regiments formed the 3rd BRIGADE & the 11th, 12th & 14th Regiments formed the 4th BRIGADE. So in speaking of the 2LH it generally means 2ALH Regiment."

From the book "The Queensland Digger", 'Formation of the First Expeditionary Force'. The Regiments comprising the Brigade were 1st LHR (from 2nd Military District), 2nd LHR (from 1st Military District), 3rdLHR (from 4th &6th Military Districy). Lieut-Colonel R.M. Stodart was appointed to Command 2nd Light Horse Regiment on 18 Aug 1914. A Squadron was enlisted mainly from the Moreton and Logan and Lockyer districts. B Squadron from Darling Downs and Burnett districts and Central Queensland; and C Squadron from North Queensland and the Northern Rivers of NSW. B Squadron Regimental Staff were Major G.H. Bourne, Capt. A.W. Nash, Lieut A.F.Chambers, Lieut. A. Chisholm, Lieut. M. Shanahan and Lieut. J. Burge.".

Airlie was in the 2ALH Regiment, B Squadron, 1st BRIGADE. He worn the "A" for ANZAC and he also wore a brass "bar" to indicate he had been wounded in action.

Dont know if this has help you. If I find out any more I will certainly let you know.

Cheers Jenny

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JenniferCWPearson

I'm certain that Colin Airlie Warden is the man. The following is from an interview in London with Captain Wallingford NZEF:

A GALLANT SCOUT.

One of the finest of all the fine men who passed through the dangerous apprenticeship of the machine-guns was the scout Warden. A native of New South Wales, Warden was in Fiji when the war broke out, and although on the reserve of officers of Australia he went to Samoa, as a private in the New Zealand contingent, and afterwards joined the main body in New Zealand, A splendid figure physically, he did not know what fear was, and he proved to be the finest scout imaginable. He it was who was told to guide the British battalions to their position on our left on the morning of the great landing at Suvla Bay, and in spite of anything said to the contrary he did guide them there, and pointed out their ground before he rejoined Captain Wallingford's section. That was a desperate day for the machine-guns. No sooner had the Wellingtons, under their fearless Colonel Malone, crowned the ridge, where they could plainly be seen against the skyline in the breaking dawn, than the four best gun teams were rushed forward to their assistance. Only two got there, and they were not complete, so the two guns were put together and worked as one. What happened to the others no one knew. Later in the day they were reinforced. It was a deadly corner, enfiladed and battered from all sides, and one after another the guns were knocked out and the crews killed or injured. The bravest of all were the Maori team, all of whom were laid out.

A HERO'S DEATH.

It was in that day's fighting that Warden met his death, and for some time it was impossible to recover the body or to bury it. Finally, on a half starlight night, the gallant Father Dore, whose name is in every mouth, with Captain Wallingford and some volunteers from the gun team nearest, crept out and furtively dug a grave, and with the simplest service the finest of scouts was laid to rest. Seven guns in all were sent to the top of Chunuk Bair, where the Wellingtons had more than held their own against odds. After 36 hours in the new trenches they were relieved and a British battalion, the Loyal North Lancs., it is believed, took their place. Seven New Zealand machine guns remained with them in garrison. During the day following it became known that the whole post had been wiped out. It simply disappeared mysteriously, something like 40 of the Lancashires getting back to the main body.

(Poverty Bay Herald 20 Nov 1915 p9).

warden_smh_2sep1915p5.jpg

PRIVATE C. A. WARDEN

Private Colin Alrlie Warden (killed in action) was 25 years of age, and the second son of the late Mr. A. A. Warden and of Mrs. Warden, of Lindsay-street, Neutral Bay. He was an engineer by profession, and was for some years in the employ of the C.S.R. Co.

He afterwards went to Fiji to follow his profession, and on ths outbreak of war volunteered from there, and went to Samoa. He was one of the ten men who hauled down the Imperial German Standard from the Government House at Apia. Private Warden was a native of Largs, in the Maitland district, and was educated at the Maitland High School. (Sydney Morning Herald 3 Sep 1915 p10).

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