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Remembered Today:

What are you doing?


Skipman
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I am researching the men, commemorated on the Aberfeldy Memorial. It's a very good way of learning about the Great War, and I have much to learn. I often wonder, when I see a post why do you want to know that?

Who or what are you researching, and why?

Cheers Mike

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Mike,

Connaught Rangers - all of them!! Why? I'm addicted!! Found my Great Grandfathers MIC and some service records last year and started from there. For now I am trying to stick to 2nd Bn from 14/08/1914 to when they were absorbed by 1st Bn in November 1914. But finding it impossible not to go off on all sorts of tangents :D

Love every minute though!

John

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I'm sort of between projects/ideas at present.

I've got an idea for research but I'm not sure what I'd do with the information once I'd got it. I might just do it for "interest", rather than with an outcome planned. If it comes together, it'd be taking me off more into the social history of the time, rather than military history.

But I think I'm going to do a local history thing before anything else. I know what I'd want to do there - and it'd hardly mention the war (except for the war memorial and a couple of mentions of blokes). So I may be taking a bit of a break from the GWF.

John

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Primarily researching concert parties, but I am also trying to complete a local history book called By the Way to Kingsthorpe.

I suppose it is a little bit of the war I can call mine.

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I rushed getting my first book finished, so as to be out before my school closed.

I have now just about finished researching the men whose names appear on my local Maghull War memorial. The research is the fun bit, whilst the writing and getting published is less so.

So now I am researching the names of the men on Liverpool University War Memorial. The last two were under 40 in number, whereas this is over 200 and will take a lot longer. Already I have found a member of the Antiguan Light Horse, a Padre buried in the Transvaal, a French soldier, and that two of "my" men were shot down by Richthofen. By their nature, many more of them were officers, which produce all sorts of different challenges and opportunities. Many more of them were RAMC (since the University started as a medical institution), and a few were vets too.

I suppose as one gets bitten by the bug, you get to enquire into all sorts of strange areas. Mespot....East Africa.....the role of the surgeon on HMS Monmouth (sunk at Coronel)......an ongoing fascination, and the more you learn, the more you come to realise that there is to know.....a constant quest.

Love it!

Bruce

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Excellent, it's amazing what floats our individual boat. Very interesting. I think because I am starting right at the bottom of the learning curve, it will take me a lot longer to finish my project, but like you, am loving every minute of it. school was never so much fun.

Cheers Mike

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I am researching the 28 men on the Bromborough War Memorial on behalf of our local history society. hopefully it will be published eventually. There will be a piece on each man, where he lived in the village and what happened to him. There will also be a little on any men I can find who lived in Bromborough and died but are not on our memorial but are on another memorial such as Port Sunlight. Also I will mention any men I can find who went and came home safely. There will also be something on what was happening at home such as fund raising activities and also details of the Red Cross Hospital opened in the local golf club. So not much work really! I am really enjoying it as I have never studied the war before so I am learning all the time as well as finding out more about the village.

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I'm working on a large set of letters and photographs of a US volunteer ambulance driver who became a USAS pilot. Intention is to publish in book form. During the research I uncovered another set of unpublished letters from a [decorated] US ambulance volunteer who lived very close to where I do now...local enough to warrant a small booklet perhaps.

Online working on compiling as much information as possible on the 1/4th Gordons - with a long-term thought of a Bn History.

For fun - working on an guide to interpreting Great War Photos with much assistance from members of the forum. Available here. Currently working on a guide to identifying infantry rifles to add to it.

Chris

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Trying to build up a history of the tank tours of the USA for a half completed book. At least four US presidents past, present and future were involved and cities right across America (and Canada) were visited. Some big holes to fill. Kind people keeps sending information (although often despite the fact that is duplicates stuff I've alread said I've got - one shouldn't be ungrateful) and every so often I dig up another snippet, but its a slow business.

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I am working on the 80 men listed on the Greengates War Memorial in Bradford. Its a bit of a trek from Hampshire to plough through the local newspapers. I have 77 positively identified, the last three are proving to be quite a challenge. if I ever finish this, then there are a couple of other local memorials to follow.

Keith

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Researching the Wilkie brothers, the Royal Naval Division, and the 5th Black Watch, as I have a letter from Maj David Wilkie concerning the death of his younger brother, Lt George Wilkie, in 1915. Maj Wilkie was himself killed in 1917 with the RND at Gavrelles.

I am researching the men, commemorated on the Aberfeldy Memorial. It's a very good way of learning about the Great War, and I have much to learn. I often wonder, when I see a post why do you want to know that?

Who or what are you researching, and why?

Cheers Mike

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Working on Regent Square Memorial (see sig below) sometimes very frustrating, other times very rewarding but always interesting. I am on holiday this week and spent a couple of hours at the Manchester Regiment Museum. Today found one of the Regent Square men who had been born at Mark Addy's (local hero) Boathouse and whos father had saved "close upon twenty lives" during his 23 years as Boatman for the Nemisis Rowing Club. Love titbits like this, along with the soldiers stories I am dscovering more about my local history.

Best wishes to you all on your own projects.

Regards,

Garry

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Researching (as my signature says) the Chaps who worked at the Great Western Railways at Swindon, downed tools to go and fight for the King and never returned.

I served my apprentiship in the same workshops that they left and would often come across a small tablet tucked away in a corner, honouring the men from that workshop payed for by their workmates.

Some of these tablets have been saved and are now in the Steam museum and the Outlet shopping mall - both of which are in former GWR workshops - but many were lost when BR closed Swindon down.

Up to the 500 mark at the moment. My main problen is that men traveled many miles to work at Swindon, when they went to join up, many returned to their home towns and have left me with just an initial and a surname to track down

Grant

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Hello Mike,

I'm humbled by reading about the projects of other Forum members. Afraid I'm not doing anything so grand myself. I continue to work on gathering information about the soldiers whose uniforms I have collected over the past 40 years, both German and British. Right now I'm researching Capt. Hector King Morrison, RE, possibly with an RFC connection. I am putting together an illustrated catalogue of my collection. The idea languished between other projects but all the while I had been amassing quite a bit of information about those who kit I have collected, fotos of them and their comrades as well as historical background. I've finally gotten around to mixing that with fotos of the uniforms themselves. Probably never get beyond a very limited (and amatuerish) vanity press edition for friends and family, but it seems the thing to do.

Cheers, Bill

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After completing the 9th Bn Sherwood Foresters history, I decided that was it (4 years of research!)

Then I decided to join the letters from Norman Butcher and his Battalion, 1st SF diaries together in a history of that Battalion :rolleyes:

Steve M

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I'm trying to research Shropshire related casualties, men on memorials, war graves, plane crashes, deaths in Shropshire, etc.

My database has over 11,000 casualties from 1400 to 2008.

Neil

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I am currently researching the French involvement on the 1st July 1916 on the Somme. Thanks to the French Government making their war diaries available on line and the kind co-operation of the staff at the Historial, Peronne, I am a long way into it. I have also joined the French Pages 14-18 forum where my very bad French is greeted with offers of all sorts of help. Trench maps a couple of weeks ago, yesterday loads of technical data on the Mortar 58 and today offers of unseen photographs of French and German artillery as well as help with detailed information on the French artillery from a French Army General no less! Another recently serving French Army officer has offered to review material in case of major errors. What a helpful, friendly (and polite) bunch they all are.

Hopefully for a new book late next year.

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i am a very small fish in this huge ocean of addiction of learning about the "great war". currently i am trying to find any information on my grandfathers unit, 6th royal dublin fusiliers. and also because of the forementioned interest on the 6th dubs, i was given a war diary[2] of one lieut frank simon who began the war with the dublin fusiliers , but who transferred to his fellow countrymen 2nd otago regt and was unfortunatly kia in jan `18. the diaries are very compelling reading indeed and give a very vivid account of those terrible days. i`d love to be able to hand them on to any surviving relative if they excist.

mike

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I have no fixed agenda but a couple of areas of special interest to me. I enjoy reading the classic works on the war. The ones which were written by contemporaries and keep cropping up in footnotes and bibliographies. I am interested in the politics leading to and during the war. This of course blends into strategy. I have a close interest in the earlier battles up to Loos. I have collected and enjoy reading German and French accounts of these areas. I have a small collection of books on Haig, modern and contemporary.

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I'm having a crack at writing a book. I'm researching and trying to put some context around a large collection of family letters. I've just about identified all soldiers and airmen mentioned and have uncovered a few interesting stories. The ultimate goal is to record it for my family honestly- the truth is just as interesting as the myths.

Have to say that I'm coming to understand why returned soldiers witheld details of their experiences from family. A lot of what I have researched is quite sobering.

Also collecting photo postcards as I like researching them. Have even provided a descendant with a copy of a photo of a soldier killed in action which was a good thing to do.

That's why I ask a few questions.

Scott.

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Researching the 10th London Regiment. Primarily the 1/10th as my Great Grandad served with them and was KIA 19/4/17.

James

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I got into all this whilst researching my own family's history - I've now broadened out to researching everybody with the surname Swarbrick who served in the War. My database currently stands at about 250 men, I've not started to try and find the women yet.

Dave Swarbrick

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