Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Yet another uniform ID please


tenlas
 Share

Recommended Posts

Hi there,

Close up badge looks like Royal Artillery.

If it helps.

Regards

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could we have a closer look at the divisional/unit cloth patch on his upper right arm? Long shot, but it might be 18th (Eastern) Division, WW2 pattern, in which case the poor so-and-so is bound for Singapore and ending up as a guest of His Imperial Majesty. Do we know who he is?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Could we have a closer look at the divisional/unit cloth patch on his upper right arm? Long shot, but it might be 18th (Eastern) Division, WW2 pattern, in which case the poor so-and-so is bound for Singapore and ending up as a guest of His Imperial Majesty. Do we know who he is?

Not very good close up I'm afraid

post-32783-1235306026.jpg

I have no idea who he is at the moment, I found it in one of my parents albums. We are Ipswich Suffolk so eastern would be more likely.

Regards

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Certainly Royal Artillery and much later than you think as he appears to be wearing the 1937 pattern web belt, as already spotted by a member. It has two brass sliders either side of the male/female buckle to help with adjustment.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think it may very well be the 18th Division badge: a black stylised windmill on a yellow square. I think the division were still in SD (as opposed to BD) quite late on, judging by other photos I've seen.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Steven,

What does SD and BD refer to?

Where were they before they went to Singapore? This picture was his wedding photo I hope the wedding was just before embarkation to Singapore.

I will have to see if anyone can recognise the photo.

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

What does SD and BD refer to?

Keith

SD = Service Dress (The WWI cut full length jacket with lower pockets)

BD = Battle Dress (the WWII short jacket, known in the US as an "ike" jacket)

Link to comment
Share on other sites

18th Division did indeed go to Singapore and among the infantry units of the Division were the 9th Bn, Royal Northumberland Fusiliers who were captured there. Had I my Divisional Order of Battle here I could have given you the artillery units that were there, who were also captured.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

While I can't say that he isn't wearing a Patt. '37 belt, it is by no means certain that he is wearing one. Private purchase belts in this style were available well before 1937. The pic below is from a 1919 Mills catalog.

post-8322-1235327640.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

135 (Hertfordshire Yeomanry) Field Regt, RA; 118 Fd Regt, RA; 148 Fd Regt, RA; 125 Anti Tank Regt, RA.

I guess 135's provenance is obvious, but the others I don't know.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Hi All,

I hope you all realised my mistake in my last post. Obviously I meant "... I hope the wedding was NOT just before embarkation ..."

I am slightly confused with the last few posts. I do know understand what SD & BD is, thanks. When do we think the photo was taken? I thought we were talking about an Eastern Division Hereford is possible but Northumberland?

Can you please spell it all out for me. :wacko:

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I'd put the picture (if it is 18th Division) as 1940-41, as the divisional patch is being worn, but BD hasn't been issued to this formation (which was a territorial division).

The infantry units were all Eastern - Suffolk, Norfolk, Cambridgeshire, Bedfordshire & Hertfordshire; the artillery was also local (HerTfordshire, not HerEfordshire Yeomanry).

The 9th Northumberland Fusiliers were the Support Battalion. Inter-war, the NF, together with the Manchesters, Cheshires and Middlesex, were converted into battalions providing mortar and machine gun units for divisions, so pretty well every infantry division would have had a battalion from one or other of those regiments, I believe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another random thing to zoom in on is his glasses. Whilst horn rim glasses were popular in the round 'windsor' style between approx 1900-1930, nosepads weren't invented til the 1920s.

Allie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I would go along with the 1940s. Looking at the albums this picture is a lot clearer sharper and the people look different than the earlier photos. Not very scientific but I know what I mean!! :blush:

Sorry I did mean Hertfordshire.

I suppose now I really need to find his name to find out which regiment he was in so I can see what he got up to. Do the collar badges signify anything as to which regiment. The cap says royal artillery, the shoulder the division what does the collar say?

I haven't looked but is there anything like "The Long Trail" to tell us where they went etc in WW2.

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Mid to late 1930s would be my guess (due to style of headwear and dress). Possibly as late as 1940ish, maybe. But I'd say more likely late 30s. However, she could be wearing someone else's old dress. Hair style more 30s than 40s as well.

Edit Hard to tell with the glasses frames, sorry.

Allie

Link to comment
Share on other sites

If it IS the 18th Division, then the picture has to be wartime, as the division wasn't reformed until after the outbreak of war. It was the second line of the 54th (East Anglian) Division. Bearing in mind wartime wasn't a great time for a la mode fashionistas!

The collar dogs are Royal Artillery.

Might be worth shifting this quest to a WW2 Forum, where there will be people who know. I'm all out of ideas, I'm afraid, and I guess, strictly speaking, this should have been closed by the Mods anyway, as it's off-topic for the GWF. Not sure about WW2 Forums (Fora?), but I believe there is at least one good one, which I believe is called ww2talk, or some such.

Good luck.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With what is evident on the photo, it has to date from post-September 1940.

dave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Well I have now found out who they are and can tell you the picture is deffinately taken before June '43 as his wife was killed by a bomb. His history is a bit vague at the moment he was not there when the bomb hit their house, but he suffered with ill health which could mean on his return from the far east.

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

With what is evident on the photo, it has to date from post-September 1940.

dave.

Why September 1940 specifically?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Another random thing to zoom in on is his glasses. Whilst horn rim glasses were popular in the round 'windsor' style between approx 1900-1930, nosepads weren't invented til the 1920s.

Allie

That can't be true I'm afraid - I myself have a pair of gold pince nez that I'm certain pre-date this with cork-lined nosepads. Also, Arthur Conan Doyle wrote in 1905 "The Adventure of the Golden Pince Nez", set in 1894, and part of Holmes analyis of the glasses that are the key to solving the case focuses on the nose-pads (although calling them clips).

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...