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Help with identification please


kaisersoffensive
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Hello

I should be most grateful for any help in identification of the following item.

Hopefully photo attachments have been added.

I believe it to be an Egg grenade body of WW1 vintage with an aluminium screw top plug.

It has the lettering I.H.B. on the bottom and G.B. in raised lettering on the aluminium screw plug.

Can anyone tell me who manufactured these,what were they filled with and did they have a percusion fuse fitted?

Thanking you in anticipation,

Regards,

Bob Norman.

post-7238-1210947846.jpg

post-7238-1210947865.jpg

post-7238-1210947881.jpg

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Guest albrown

German WW1 eihandgranate mod 1917 with transit plug. The 1917 egg grenade existed in 2 types. Both were made of cast iron.

The first model was completely smooth, the second type had a fragmented ring over the side of the body.

Grenades were transported with a plug in the top and had the fuzes packed seperately in the crate. Several types of fuzes were used on these grenades, pull-friction and a pull-percussion fuze.I have just got one of these and the base and plug are both marked R F

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German WW1 eihandgranate mod 1917 with transit plug. The 1917 egg grenade existed in 2 types. Both were made of cast iron.

The first model was completely smooth, the second type had a fragmented ring over the side of the body.

Grenades were transported with a plug in the top and had the fuzes packed seperately in the crate. Several types of fuzes were used on these grenades, pull-friction and a pull-percussion fuze.I have just got one of these and the base and plug are both marked R F

Many thanks for this information.

Regards,

Bob Norman

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I think Al has given a pretty comprehensive answer, but I'd say there were three types of body. The smooth first type, the second type, which is the one illustrated in post 1# where the top of the frag ring is angled out, and a third type where the frag ring is less prominent. Most found are the 3rd type. I've got about 6 of these but have not got either of the first two types. The drawings in Patrice Delhomme's book show the differences between the last two types.

Of interest is the wide variety of fuzes. Most were 5 second burn, with pull wires but some had plungers. Always interesting and nice little collectables.

Gunner Bailey

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Hi Bob,

i believe they were filled with 'black' powder, a form of gunpowder, not the explosive found in British grenades which worked quite well but was subject to moisture in a big way. If it got at all damp it simply did not go off or only did so partially. However i am no expert on this and perhaps those that are can correct me if i am wrong.

Andy A

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Hi Bob,

i believe they were filled with 'black' powder, a form of gunpowder, not the explosive found in British grenades which worked quite well but was subject to moisture in a big way. If it got at all damp it simply did not go off or only did so partially. However i am no expert on this and perhaps those that are can correct me if i am wrong.

Andy A

Many thanks Andy and to the others who have so kindly supplied information.

Regards,

Bob Norman

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Guest albrown

after a it more seaching around i have found another two practice versions one looks the same as the live grenade but uses a dummy fuze the other shown in the attatched picture,uses a altered fuze with a small black powder charge ,this is easily identified by three holes in the base of the grenade which emit smoke/flash(this photo copied with permission from owner),I also found this reference to the fillings used in the live version "30 gr. black powder, aluminium and baryte nitrate. "

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Heres a nice cutaway to show wall thickness.

Mick

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While I'm at it, heres a French F1 Grenade with percussion fuze.

Mick

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Just to add a bit to the above. The ring was not really a fragmentation ring but added to aid grip. The early smooth bodies are quite scarce and often at French fairs you may find ground down second models masquerading as the first... Charge was 32g of black powder (ie common or garden gunpowder) or HE.

Most common is the 5 sek pull fuze of the same type fitted to Kugels, then the screw capped type with chain or string similar (in principle) to a Stielhandgranate fuze and lastly the plunger type - very rare. A common error is to find the bronze or brass type wire pull fuze that was never used with these grenades.

The British of course copied the Eierhandgranate with their own No.34 Egg although Saunders notes that it was more effective in fragmentation than the German egg which owed more to blast effect.

Pics here of various models and (top right in main pic) is that dodgy fuze that you sometimes see fitted - IIRC it was actually an artillery piece igniter (maybe even Second war and used as a boobytrap ie - instantaneous)?

grenadefusesetc.jpg

egf1.jpg

egf2.jpg

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