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Help with service record please


nhclark
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post-16913-1210417513.gifCould I get some help with the attached service record please?

I understand some of it, and I know that this sort of record has been discussed before. However...

Taking the third and fourth entries, Egmont 3. Do these mean that he was actually in Malta attached to Egmont 3, which I understand to have been an accounting base at Malta, but dealing with the accounts of the Kite Balloon Section and then the Royal Naval Division, both at Port Said? Or was he in Port Said but on the books at Egmont 3?

And similarly for the remaining entries. Was he in Aden, or if not where was he?

Also see the reference to "Coder." I saw this discussed on a previous occasion, but it does seem that he was a coder of some description. The dates correspond to his involvement with (or in) Aden. What might he have been coding?

Any help much appreciated.

Thank you,

Noel

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Noel,

He would be in Port Said and Aden he was only attatched to Egmont III as a supernumerarie for administration his actual service would follow or be in brackets.

He was Writer and also employed as a Coder and Decoder of Wireless Telegraphy Messages, getting 2d a day extra pay.

Regards Charles

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He was initially with one of the Kite Balloon Sections, there are various files for them in the Air 1 records. See thread in War in the Air.

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Thank you gentlemen.

Supplementary question. Where might I find some sort of description of the activities/establishment, etc. at Port Said and Aden during WW1? I've Googled away merrily, but can't seem to find anything of much substance.

Thank you,

Noel

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I couldnt say about anything on the internet, his job would almost certainly be classified so you may need to dig deeper. Port Said generally was a transit port for the Balkans etc. Aden is tactically important and was normally garrisoned.

Regards Charles

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Port Said was used by the Egypt and East Indies Squadron. Wasn't there a network of wireless stations across the British Empire for repeating messages and listening in to traffic; part of the system eventually evolving into GCHQ. Aden was a coaling station and would need wireless, signals and writing staff.

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Per Ardua, many thanks for your reply.

Do you have any further information on these various "Stations"/"Squadrons"/"Fleets"? I've Googled away for hours, but cannot find anything really substantial that pertains to the First World War period.

It seems that Aden was a depot/base on the East Indies Station, but I don't really understand the difference between the "East Indies Station" and the "Egypt and East Indies Station."

I have stumbled across a couple of references to the network of wireless stations that you mention, but again nothing substantial.

I have gleaned bits and pieces about Port Said. It, too, was a coaling station, and also a major convoy assembly port, hospital centre, transit port for troop movements to Egypt and Palestine, was home to the East Indies and Egypt Seaplane Squadron from January 1916, and was a kite balloon base for convoy escorts.

If anyone can provide any further insights I'd be extremely grateful.

Thank you,

Noel

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Have you tried the Official History - Naval Operations? Some details on both are in Jane's Fighting Ships 1919

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Just to confuse us the Navy used station both for an individual localtion (for which I'll use lower case) and a wider grouping (which I'll capitalise). I don't know a definitive answer, but I'll give it a go: stations were where ships were stationed! Because of the global nature of Britain's maritime empire there were outposts dotted all over and the world was divided up into areas of command. Stations were a bit like garrisons; an individual station was a base, while a Station was a collection of bases and a geographical area over which a senior officer was responsible. So when trouble blew up local ships could respond and everyone knew who took charge. I'm surprised that someone hasn't reeled off the list of stations for you; they'll probably leap in to correct my attempt.

Squadrons were a collection of ships under the command of a senior officer; fleets were larger collections of ships. I have never seen a precise definition for one or the other as to when a large squadron became a fleet. Squadrons can be detached form a fleet to operate seperately.

In all this don't forget the importance of the Suez Canal! Port Said was added to the responsibility of the East Indies Station for the duration, becomming the seat of the Comander-in-Chief East Indies (that would boost the need for coders) as the Mediterranian commander's focus was elsewhere, to ensure it was defended. The Canal was a vital link to India and the transport of Indian troops and their use in Mespot and the Middle East was an important requirement for the East Indies Station. There have been some threads on Sinai and the Egyptian campaign on the forum.

Edited by per ardua per mare per terram
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I haven't studied wireless at this time as a seperate topic, just picked up stray facts when looking at other things. It was very much high tech of the time and range was an issue, hence the need for repeater stations. The hunt for Graf Spee's squadron gives an indication of the spread of wireless, allbeit in the Pacific.

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