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Remembered Today:

GSW = Gun shot wounds?


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Hi Pals,

I have been looking at the service record for Walter Elsby who was discharged in 1917 due to wounds. It seems he had a gun shot wound to his left hip.

gswcopy.jpg

In this letter from his file, Walter says he received the wound on the 8th Feb 1916.

Letter-1.jpg

This extract from the war diary for 19th Manchester Regiment for 8th Feb 1916 states as far as I can read "Finished fatigues 3 companies ?bached? or posted 1 casualty wounded".

19-Manchester-feb-16-3.gif

If the regiment where doing fatigues i presume this means they are away from the front line? Therefore the wound would be less likely to have been from a German gun. Any thoughts?

TIA

Garry

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Garry,

It would say in his documents if it was Self inflicted, I have several wounded, one KIA and one DOW, when someone (a member of the same company) threw a bomb in the cookhouse whilst they were out of the line.

Regards Charles

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Charles,

Thanks for the prompt reply. There is no mention of "Self inflicted" though the thought did cross my mind.

Regards,

Garry

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GSW is a bit of a catchall that will include shrapnel wounds.

The battalion history has little to say about the period between mid Janaury and the end of Feb, noting that they alternated between billets at Bray and the trenches at carnoy but specifcially mentions "There was intermittent shelling during most of this period".

John

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John,

Is his B103 (Casualty form Active Service) in the documents that will say what date he was wounded who reported the wound and were he was sent..

Regards Charles

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Thanks John.

I knew the diaries I requested from you would be a help and your prediction, via PM, regarding when the wound was inflicted was spot on.

Cheers,

Garry

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"Finished fatigues 3 companies ?bached?

That reads: "Furnished fatigues. 3 Companies bathed"

i.e. working parties were provided and 3 companies had use of the (divisional?) baths.

Ken

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When in the front line there was a rotation with about a third in the front trench, one third in the support trench and the last third just behind the line but available to advance to provide support. All would be in danger from long range shelling and from sniper fire if they exposed themselves. I've read accounts of men going to the baths in relatively quiet periods. The baths might be up to 3 miles further back and out of range of most enemy guns. Quite a trek for a sluice.

Even when up in the front line there were still fatigues - Keeping the trench clean. emptying the latrines, filling sandbags etc etc.

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Keep in mind that the term 'fatigues' covered a multitude of tasks, including carrying suplies (rations, ammunition, water, etc) up to the front line. It was a hazardous duty, and more than one soldier was decorated for gallantry while engaged in fatigues.

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